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AEA to Award $1,000 Toward an ADS-B Upgrade to Five Aircraft Owners at AirVenture

by GlobalAir.com 21. July 2014 16:52
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LEE'S SUMMIT, MISSOURI, July 21, 2014 - To help incentivize owners of general aviation aircraft to meet the Federal Aviation Administration's ADS-B Out mandate, the Aircraft Electronics Association will randomly award five aircraft owners with $1,000 toward an ADS-B compliant upgrade.

"The FAA recently made it clear to Congress that the Jan. 1, 2020, deadline for ADS-B Out compliance is not going to change," said Paula Derks, AEA president. "The avionics repair shops have less than six years to equip approximately 186,000 operational aircraft, which means the industry must upgrade more than 130 aircraft per workday between now and the deadline. Currently, the industry is barely upgrading 100 aircraft a month, or around five per workday. Obviously, there's a lot of catching up to do.

"While the avionics repair shops have the capacity to meet demand at the present time, this will not be the case beyond 2016 unless the installation pace picks up dramatically. Aircraft owners who wait to equip will face scheduling pressure and higher installation costs as we get closer to the deadline. By awarding $1,000 to five different aircraft owners to help them become compliant sooner rather than later, the AEA hopes to send a message to owners of general aviation aircraft that the time to act and upgrade is now."

Aircraft owners may enter to win one of the five $1,000 giveaways at the AEA's booth (No. 2035/36 in hangar B) during the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The AEA will announce one winner each day from July 29 through Aug. 2 through its social media outlets on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, and from its booth in Oshkosh.

Aircraft owners must be at least 18 years old to register to win. Each of the five winners must use an AEA-member avionics shop to complete the installation, and the installation must be scheduled by Aug. 1, 2015. One entry gives aircraft owners a chance to win each of the five daily drawings.

About the Aircraft Electronics Association - Founded in 1957, the Aircraft Electronics Association represents nearly 1,300 member companies in 43 countries, including government-certified international repair stations specializing in maintenance, repair and installation of avionics and electronic systems in general aviation aircraft. The AEA membership also includes manufacturers of avionics equipment, instrument repair facilities, instrument manufacturers, airframe manufacturers, test equipment manufacturers, major distributors, engineers and educational institutions. For more information, contact Geoff Hill, AEA director of communications, at 816-347-8400 or geoffh@aea.net.

10 Things to Do at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

by Sarina Houston 15. July 2014 17:18
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Headed to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh this year? Here's a rundown of some of the must-see aircraft and events!

  1. View the action on the Ultralight Runway. At the south end of the airport, you can sit back and relax while watching powered parachutes, powered gliders, light sport aircraft and other ultralights fly around each morning and night. You'll also see hot air balloons and home-built rotorcraft.
  2. Help build the One Week Wonder airplane and sign the logbook as a builder. The aircraft, a Zenith CH 750, is a kit plane that Oshkosh staff hopes will showcase how a plane can be built easily and affordably. The aircraft will be built over the course of seven days at EAA AirVenture 2014.
  3. Watch the Rockwell Collins Night Air Show and fireworks display. This one's a no-brainer. Who would want to miss performances from some of the best air show performers in the world, especially when pyrotechnics are involved? There's an impressive fireworks display at the end of each night air show.
  4. Take an EAA Selfie and post it to Twitter using the official AirVenture selfie hashtag, #EAASelfie. And don't forget to tag us @GlobalAir!
  5. Visit the Fly Market for the latest and greatest aviation accessories, gadgets and technology! This is a great place to pick up those flight supplies you've been wanting, grab some swag, and enter to win drawings at the booths of various aviation companies.
  6. Tip your hat to veterans after the Old Glory Honor Flight returns. After the air show on August 1st, a group of veterans will return from visiting memorials in Washington, D.C. on a Boeing 737. This is your chance to stand among thousands of others and salute them as they return "home" - a welcome home party they deserve!
  7. Dust off your flight bag at the "Rusty Pilot" seminar. Don't we all need a refresher? If you haven't flown in a while, chances are good that you'll be inspired to get back in the air while you're at Oshkosh. Naturally, one of your first stops should be the AOPA Rusty Pilot Seminar. It's the perfect way to brush up on your skills, including a rundown of what you've missed and what's changed within the past few years that you've been away. Bonus: Breakfast will be provided!
  8. Learn how to pass your checkride… or how to build an airplane…or how to buy an airplane…or how to build a hangar…or how to lean an engine….or how to take better pictures… you get the picture!
  9. Try your hand at "flying" the F-35 simulator/cockpit display. F-35 instructors will be on hand to demonstrate the abilities of the newest fighter jet with the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Cockpit Display.
  10. Stop by the Globalair.com booth! Have we met before? Stop by and meet your hard-working GlobalAir team! We'll be in Hangar D, Booth 4028.

What are you looking forward to most at Oshkosh this year? Let us know in the comments!

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Flying | Airports | News | Sarina Houston

Open House Held for Newly Built Landmark Aviation LFPB Facility

by GlobalAir.com 2. July 2014 15:26
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A first look at Landmark LFPB’s new facility, which includes a VIP lounge, bistro, pilot lounge, passenger lobby, flight planning center, prayer room, and two conference rooms. Photos courtesy Landmark Aviation.

(Houston, TX – July 2, 2014) An open house was held on June 26 to highlight the newly constructed 8,500 square-foot Landmark Aviation Aéroport de Paris le Bourget (LFPB) facility. Built on the existing property, the new facility is adjacent to Landmark’s hangar and is located at Avenue de l’Europe 93350 Le Bourget.

“We are very pleased to announce the completion of our new, state-of-the-art facility at Aéroport de Paris le Bourget,” Landmark Aviation President and CEO Dan Bucaro stated. “We appreciate the support provided by the airport authority throughout this process, and look forward to not only better serving our existing customers, but to increasing business at Le Bourget.”

The new terminal includes a VIP lounge, bistro, pilot lounge, passenger lobby, flight planning center, prayer room, and two conference rooms. The construction project has taken approximately one year. In addition to the terminal building, Landmark will add covered parking to the facility.

“Our new facility is much more spacious and offers additional amenities that will allow us to provide a better experience for our customers,” Landmark Aviation’s LFPB General Manager Denis Bourgois said.

About Landmark Aviation
Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Landmark Aviation operates a network of fixed base operations located throughout the U.S., Canada and Western Europe. The Company offers a wide range of services, including FBO, MRO, aircraft management & charter. Landmark is a portfolio company of the Carlyle Group. For more information, visit www.landmarkaviation.com.

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Aviation Fuel | Fixed Based Operators (FBO) | Airports | News | Press Release

No Better Time to be Connected

by GlobalAir.com 1. July 2014 16:59
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By Mark Wilken
Director of Avionics Sales at Elliott Aviation

www.elliottaviation.com

High-speed internet on your corporate aircraft can exponentially increase it’s value. Photo courtesy www.FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Business aircraft offers you and your company’s employees the opportunity to get to critical business meetings in a fraction of the time it takes to fly commercial. Historically, however, travel time has been counted as unproductive from both the perspective of the traveler and the CFO. Recent advancements in Wi-Fi connectivity in business aircraft have provided us the opportunity to bring our offices into the sky. Until recently, these options have been cost prohibitive to many aircraft owners and operators.

The Aircell ATG 2000 high-speed internet system is designed for business jets and turboprops to allow you to access the internet, check email and use your smartphone to call and text (using Gogo ® Text & Talk service) on a budget. From now until December 31, 2014, the ATG 2000 equipment package can be purchased at approximately $45,000 plus installation charges. This is $12,000 off of list price and will allow up to five users instead of the original plan of three users. Aircell’s industry-leading network allows you to access high-speed internet above 10,000 feet just about anywhere in the United States and many areas in Canada. Data service starts at $395 per month or is offered as a pay-as-you-go alternative. Voice plans start at just $134.95 per month.

Providing Wi-Fi in your aircraft not only offers an increase in employee productivity, but allows a better quality of life on the ground by allowing employees to effectively manage their workload during travel and not have to bring their work home. As the demand rises for the ATG 2000 system, there is no better time to take advantage of Aircell’s promotion.

Mark Wilken joined Elliott Aviation in 1989 as an Avionics Bench Technician. He was promoted to Avionics Manager in 1996 and joined the sales team in 2003. Mark has led many highly successful avionics programs such as the King Air Garmin G1000 avionics retrofit program. He recently led efforts for Wi-Fi solutions in Hawkers, King Airs and Phenom 300’s. Mark holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Aviation Management from Southern Illinois University and is a licensed Pilot.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

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Aviation Technology | Flying

How much information do you need to effectively manage your costs? Part 1

by David Wyndham 1. July 2014 14:23
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TLDR (1): If you don't have time to read the entire post, I'll summarize it for you: To manage your costs, you need all the cost information available. It needs to be organized and presented in a manner that has meaning for you.

 

Step one with the costs is to collect them. You have to pay the bills, so the collection is part of making sure the bills are valid.  Information is in the invoice, the credit card receipt, and in your email. But just having collected this information does not lead to effective management. You have to make some sense of it. 

Step two is to organize the costs into accounts, or categories: fuel, insurance, hotels, parking fees, catering, salaries, taxes, and so on. If you have more than one aircraft, then you should separate the costs by aircraft, even if they are the same model. If your maintenance costs for two jets are $1,000 per hour, are they $500 per hour per aircraft, our $300 per hour for one, and $700 per hour for the other? There is a difference. Once organized into categories then next step if to also organize by behavior.

To manage the costs collected, you also need to understand how they behave. In further organizing your costs, consider the behavior of the cost. How will costs change with changes in utilization? How does the cost behave with a change in activity? Two categories are variable and fixed costs.

A Variable Cost will vary in proportion to the level of activity. As activity increases, the total cost will increase but the cost per unit will remain constant. A good example of this is fuel. An increase in hours flown will have a corresponding increase in fuel consumed. However, the cost per gallon of fuel will not be affected. Hourly guaranteed maintenance programs will also vary in relation to the hours flown. If you use contract flight crew, that would also be considered as a variable cost.

A Fixed Cost as the name implies, remains essentially constant for a given period or level of activity. A pilot's annual salary is a fixed cost. Whether you fly a little or a lot, the pilot still is paid their same salary. The cost per unit will change with a change in activity. A pilot making $100,000 annually and flying 250 hours would be a cost of $400 per hour. If the pilot flies 300 annual hours, the salary as a per hour cost is $333.33. Your hangar cost, hull and liability insurance, cost of refresher training, and property taxes are all considered as fixed costs.  

Two other ways to differentiate the behavior of a cost is to look at how well you can connect the cost to a particular function. If the elimination of the function would also eliminate the cost, then that cost is directly associated with that function, and thus, is a Direct Cost. If the cost is not closely tied into that function, then it is an Indirect Cost. If the function is eliminated, the Indirect Cost won't go away. Depending on the function, or the levels within the organization, a cost can be classified as Direct and Indirect.

Consider the pilot salary from before. If that pilot flies a single aircraft, say a Hawker 800, then the pilot salary of $100,000 is a direct cost for the Hawker 800. If the pilot also flies a Bell 206, then the pilot salary is not directly associated with just the Hawker 800 as it is also associated with the Bell 206. If the Hawker is sold, but the pilot still is flying in the Bell 206, the pilot still gets paid. So with regard to the Hawker 800, the dual-rated pilot salary is an indirect cost. 

If the aviation department consists of the Hawker 800 and Bell 206, the $100,000 pilot salary is a direct cost. Close the aviation department and the pilot salary goes away. If your aviation department is just a single aircraft, then the direct versus indirect distinction can be ignored. But for operations of two or more aircraft, the distinction will be important as you track, allocate, and budget your costs.

Now that these costs are collected and organized by cost category and behavior, you are ready to start the process of managing these costs. It is necessary for creating a budget, for planning for future costs, and for understanding what changes in costs will have on your total cost of operations. Next month we'll continue the article.

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David Wyndham





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