Welcome to GlobalAir.com | 888-236-4309 |    | Please Register or Login
Aviation Articles
Home Aircraft For Sale  | Aviation Directory  |  Airport Resource  |   Blog  | My Flight Department  | MaxTrax
Aviation Articles

What You Should Know About the New Student Pilot Certificate

by Sarina Houston 2. February 2016 00:33
Share on Facebook

New changes to FAA student pilot certificates are coming our way, and although there was an initial display of panic from some members of the flight training community, the new student pilot certificate rule might just be a good thing. Here’s what you need to know about the new rule, which begins April 1st, 2016:

The Details
First, don’t panic. Although students could have a delay in getting their student pilot certificates, it’s not all bad news. Here’s the scoop:

  • Students won’t have to go to the FSDO to get a student pilot certificate. FAA certified flight instructors, designated pilot examiners, Part 141 programs, and the FSDO will be all able to accept and submit applications for student pilot certificates. The student pilot applicant will have to show up in person and bring a photo ID to verify identity.
  • The new student pilot certificate will not expire, which brings it in line with the other certifications.
  • Instructors will no longer have to endorse both the student’s logbook and the student pilot certificate. Only one endorsement will be necessary from now on, which simplifies the process.
  • The student pilot applications will go through some kind of TSA approval process, which, whether we like it or not, should add a layer of security to flight training that we don’t currently have.
  • Student pilots who already have a paper student pilot certificate may continue to use it until it expires, or may choose to obtain a new plastic student pilot certificate from the FAA.

What could possibly go wrong?
Okay, so we know that it won’t be a perfect process, and as with any new process, there are sure to be frustrations involved. The biggest frustration that people foresee is that there will be a delay in the processing of student pilot applications. The FAA says it will process the applications as quickly as possible, but that it could take weeks or even months before the student receives the new plastic pilot certificate in the mail.

This delay in processing will potentially make it impossible for student pilots to solo right when they’re ready to. Some students, especially those in fast-paced flight training programs, will get to the potential solo flight in a matter of days or weeks, and will be left waiting on a student pilot certificate to arrive in the mail. This can be a source of frustration, to be sure.

Finally, should a student pilot applicant be denied a student pilot certificate based on information gleaned from the TSA check, the student will be faced with an appeals process that, as we all know, could take an extended amount of time. This, perhaps, will be the greatest source of frustration for those who may be “flagged” in the system for some reason, but who are otherwise eligible for a student pilot certificate. And perhaps, sadly, we’ll lose a few potential student pilots to yet another lengthy appeals process.

What do you think about the new student pilot application rules? A good thing or bad?

Tags: , ,

Flying | Sarina Houston

Does your aircraft make "cents"?

by David Wyndham 1. February 2016 12:14
Share on Facebook

It used to be that the choice of what business aircraft to acquire was a decision made by the CEO and the Chief Pilot. The boss said "I want this aircraft" and the pilot either got it or tried to dissuade the boss for reasons of speed, cabin or range. Today, opportunities to use business aircraft are sufficient only if the numbers make sense, and make "cents."

Some years ago I did a study for a manufacturer who was expanding from the Americas into Asia, particularly China.  They already had a larger-cabin business jet, but the senior leaders were considering a much larger airplane with global range to better meet their expanded travel needs. The CEO and Senior VP were clear on what they needed—the  ability to go global.

The CFO was just as clear on what he needed—financial justification. There was no way would he stand for a what he called "A Royal Barge."  In other words,  the aircraft had to earn its keep, or he would recommend the board veto it. This is exactly why you hire a CFO. It is their job to make sure every dollar gets spent wisely.  Our goal then was to recommend an aircraft upgrade that could handle the global travel of the CFO and SVP, both as flying-office and as restful-space, so that these rainmakers could do business right after landing. But since, the the CFO and board were not going to write a blank check, we needed the financial justification for the global jet.

Going from the corporate headquarters to to Asia was two-stops with the aircraft available at the time. One-stop to Asia was technically feasible but only if the weather was perfect and the headwinds were light. Our analyses identified two sets of aircraft.  A 4,100 NM range aircraft  could get them to or from Asia with one-stop 95% of the time. A 6,000 NM range gave them the desirable non-stop capability. Aircraft in these categories all have comfortable cabins with the latest navigation and communication systems. The seats could fully recline allowing for the executive to rest, if necessary. The galley could prepare the meals needed to fuel people for a 10 to 14-hour trip.  The financial differences that had to be addressed were:

 

  • Any new aircraft would cost more to acquire than the sunk investment in their current, smaller business jet.
  • Operating costs would go up with a bigger jet. However, given the newer aircraft's more fuel efficient engines and advanced systems, the cost jump was minimal.
  • Acquisition had to make sense financially.

 

We were able to show the added days in the office and the business jet’s more productive travel environment en-route were valuable to the company. The reduced travel time and more restful experience en route was seen as significant by the CFO. The saved travel days, the productive work environment on the business jet, and the secure work environment were good financial reasons for the new aircraft. Still, the question remained— do they obtain the 4,100 NM jet or the 6,000 NM jet? 

Looking at the Asia trips, we compared the added costs to acquire and operate the larger jet with its 6,100nm range with the cost of the fuel stops and added travel time of the 4,100 NM jet. We looked at the difference in the ownership costs - acquisition and residual value after 10 years in this case.  Based on the trip frequency, we arrived at a cost savings of about $600,000 per year by accepting the one-hour fuel stop needed with the 4,100 NM jet on Asian trips. The CFO was not sold on the 6,100 NM aircraft as adding that much more value. The flight department, CEO and Senior VP were satisfied with the 4,100 NM jet, which is the aircraft they purchased.

Given the frequency of their Asia trips, the 6,000 NM jet was not financially justifiable.  Operationally, the flight department favored the shorter stage lengths with a break, even with the added crew member.  For this company, the numbers made send for the 4,100 NM jet. For another company with higher trip frequencies or greater passenger loads, the 6,000 NM jet would make better sense. In all cases, you have to look at the costs and the benefits to do what makes "cents" financially within the parameters of the mission requirements. 

 

Tags:

Aviation Technology | David Wyndham

Nine Great Aviation Events you Don't Want to Miss

by Tori Williams 1. February 2016 07:00
Share on Facebook

There are hundreds of exciting annual aviation events for seasoned pilots and aviation enthusiasts alike to visit this year. These events will bring a lot of new networking opportunities, as well as chances to just have fun. With the pilot shortage quickly approaching, there is no better time than now to get your foot in the door with the company you’ve always dreamed of being with. Networking with them at an upcoming aviation event could be your chance to shine.

Even if you are not looking to get into a job in the industry, visiting air shows and conventions can be the highlight of your year. Many companies unveil new products and aircraft at these events, so I encourage everyone to attend as many as possible and enjoy the unique culture and friendliness in the world of aviation.

I have personally visited or know of someone who has gone to each of these events, so I can vouch for their outstanding quality. I included one for almost every month, as to give a good overview of when these major events are happening. I hope that you are able to attend at least one of these events this year, and that you have a great time!

Soaring Society of America Convention
February 18-20
Greenville, South Carolina
This three-day conference is the perfect getaway for those of us who prefer to take the to skies without an engine. The Soaring Society of America was formed in 1932 and currently has upwards of 12,000 members. According to their website, SAA members and soaring fans from all over the United States and Canada gather to learn the latest soaring technology developments, attend lectures, and meet with friends.


photo by Andrew Zaback—Attendees of the 2014 WAI Conference hear Eileen Collins speak at the Luncheon on Friday before being dismissed to enjoy seminars and interact with exhibitors.

Women in Aviation International Conference
March 10-12
Nashville, Tennessee
I was lucky enough to attend the 2014 Women in Aviation International conference at Walt Disney World in Florida. I was truly blown away by how much thought and preparation was put into every aspect of the weekend. This year should be no different, as the lineup of workshops and speakers listed online look incredibly interesting. They also have a variety of companies that come and conduct face-to-face interviews with job seekers that attend the conference. Participating companies include Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, United Airlines, Delta Airlines, NetJets, FedEx, and several more.

Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-in Expo
April 5th-10th
Lakeland, Florida
There is no better way to kick off your year of fly-ins and air shows by paying a visit to the beautiful Lakeland, Florida for Sun ‘n Fun Something that is unique about Sun ‘n Fun is how the majority of its profits sponsor the Aerospace Center for Excellence that helps shape the future of aviation by providing educational programs for youth interested in aviation. Who knew having so much fun could have such a great impact!

AOPA Fly-In
May 20-21
Beaufort, North Carolina
There are several AOPA Fly-Ins around America during the year, and this event in May is the perfect weekend trip for pilots with all levels of experience. All attendees are invited to the Barnstorming Party on Friday and encouraged to enjoy the fly-in sights and sounds on Saturday. AOPA offers several educational seminars during the weekend, including the Rusty Pilot seminar to help get you back on track if you have taken a few years off flying.

Ladies Love Taildraggers Fly-in
June 3-5
Sulphur Springs, Texas
Tragically, last year’s LLT Fly-in was canceled four days before the event due to a tornado hitting the airport. This year the ladies are as excited as ever to host taildragger enthusiasts from all over as they rebound from last year. Attendees are welcome to camp by their aircraft, or spend the night at the Sulphur Springs Best Western. During the weekend they have a poker run to benefit their scholarship fund, amongst other fun activities.

 

Photo showing around 10% of the attractions at Oshkosh.

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh
July 25-31
Oshkosh, Wisconsin
I have been lucky enough to attend AirVenture the last three years, actually flying in with my fiancé the last two. I am uncertain if I will be able to make it this year as our wedding is the very next weekend, but AirVenture has been the best week of my summer every year I’ve gone. The sheer size of the event alone is worth visiting just to see. There is never a dull moment at Oshkosh, and I encourage every pilot who has never gotten the chance to experience it to do their best to stop by this year!

Lee Bottom Fly-in
September 16-18
Madison, Indiana
This privately owned grass strip in Indiana holds a special place in my heart, as during one of my first ever flight lessons my instructor took me to their beautiful field on the Ohio river and we did our first exhilarating grass landing. I have flown up and attended their annual fly-in twice before, and the relaxed atmosphere with incredibly friendly hosts makes this a must-do for any pilot.

Finale of the Red Bull Air Race
October 15-16
Las Vegas, Nevada
Few things mix the world of extreme sports and aviation better than the Red Bull Air Races. Even watching the event on television gets my heart pumping, and I will hopefully be attending their previous stop in Indianapolis. This is a big year for the air race because they have their first ever female competitor, Melanie Astles.

NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention
November 1-2
Orlando, Florida
This event is truly the holy grail of business aviation. All different aspects of the business aviation world are represented at this conference, and most are there to get deals made. If you want to network with other business professionals then this is the one event that you cannot miss. It also gives you a pretty good idea of what the next biggest trends in aviation will be.

I hope that this gives you at least an idea of the variety of events that are offered this year! To view more events, or to list your own, please visit our GlobalAir.com Aviation Events Calendar!

Tags: , , ,

Flying | Tori Williams

How to Get Rid of Check Ride Anxiety

by Sarina Houston 18. January 2016 23:37
Share on Facebook

Okay, so maybe there’s no getting rid of check ride anxiety altogether. In fact, a certain level of anxiety is helpful. It keeps you alert and ‘on your toes.’ But no matter how many check rides you take, it never seems to get any easier. Got a case of the check ride jitters? Here are a few ways to minimize your anxiety and maximize your chances of performing well on your check ride.

Take a mock check ride.
A successful mock check ride can be a great tool to help ease check ride anxiety. It’s often done with a more experienced instructor or a chief pilot at the flight school, preferably with someone who has been around for a while and has a successful pass rate of his own. You’ll probably find that the instructor evaluating you on your mock check ride will offer some constructive feedback, but in the end will tell you that you’re more than ready.

Get the gouge.
The actual content of check rides can vary wildly based on location and the check pilots themselves are different, as well. Don’t go in blind, without knowing anything about the examiner! Talk to other students and instructors in the local area before choosing an examiner, and you’ll often find that they charge different rates, have different philosophies and focus on different areas of the PTS. Asking students who have recently completed a check ride for tips is helpful, but always be prepared for anything!

Read through the PTS.
We can often ease anxiety by knowing what to expect, and failing to read through the FAA Practical Test Standards is a common mistake among students. The PTS provides information on how the check ride will be conducted, the examiner’s responsibilities, and the exact standards that you’ll be held to. If you know exactly what to expect, many of your fears may be alleviated.

Follow a checklist for what to bring to your check ride.
Your stress level will increase if you leave for your check ride without something important like, say, your logbook. Or your photo ID. Make a checklist and organize your materials beforehand, and then double-check and triple-check to make sure you have all of the required documents and materials.

Remind yourself that the worst that can happen isn’t really that bad.
So what if you fail? You’ll have to go up with an instructor and obtain a bit more instruction on the maneuver or maneuvers that you didn’t perform to standards during your check ride. Then, you’ll take a re-test and you’ll pass. I once heard an instructor say that your private pilot license just says “Private Pilot” and not “Private-Pilot-Who-Failed-His-First-Check-Ride.”

Remind yourself that the examiner actually wants you to do well.
He really does. Most examiners know that by the time you’ve been endorsed by your instructor for a check ride, you’ve put in the hard work. You’ve spent at least 40 hours, maybe 140 hours, practicing maneuvers, and many of those hours were by yourself. The examiner knows that you’re perfectly capable of flying safely. By the time you get to your check ride, it’s just another flight to the practice area.

Remind yourself that your instructor wouldn’t endorse you if you weren’t ready.
If you fail, it’s not just you that fails - it’s your instructor, too. Your flight instructor won’t send you for a check ride if you aren’t ready. It’s that simple.

Think safety.
Your examiner isn’t looking for perfection, just consistency and a safe outcome. Every examiner will have safety in mind. Can you complete the flight safely? By the time you are signed off to take a check ride, you’ve soloed at least 10 hours - probably more - and you’ve demonstrated that you can safely fly to another airport at least 50 miles away and back safely. While on your check ride, always err on the side of safety, and you’ll be just fine.

Prepare, prepare, prepare…
Study, chair fly and spend some time with your instructor going over anything that you don’t clearly understand.

Then prepare some more.
The more prepared you are, the less anxious you’ll be.

Then stop preparing and get some sleep.
Fatigue causes missteps and mistakes. A good night’s sleep is necessary to ensure that you’re at the top of your game. Showing up for a check ride after only a few hours of sleep is always a bad idea.

Bring a lunch.
On the day of your check ride, be sure to eat a healthy breakfast and bring a lunch or at least a few snacks. Things often take longer than you think, whether it’s last-minute calculations on your flight plan or waiting for the maintenance guy to show up to hand over the maintenance logs, you might find that the day moves along slower than you anticipated. And the last thing you want to do is get in the airplane with an empty stomach, depleted of energy after hours of running around on the ground.

Think positive!
It’s normal and healthy to be a bit nervous - it keeps us on top of things. But there’s something to be said for positive thinking, and for knowing that failure is often just part of the process. After you’ve spent countless hours preparing for your check ride, the only thing left to do is to think positively and hope for the best!

Add Value or Leave

by David Wyndham 5. January 2016 10:51
Share on Facebook

 

When you get down to the basics, we humans must cooperate with each other in order to survive and prosper. Each one of us takes up space and uses resources. If we don't add back more than we consume, we are draining or depleting resources needed by others. Read into that whatever resources you wish - food, money, relationships, etc. At work, we are the same. As employees we also are taking up the company's resources. We are provided space to work, heat/AC and light in that space, computers, telephones, etc. Periodically, we receive a paycheck. If we don't add back to the company at least what we consume, we may not be in that job very long. This holds true for janitors, engineers, and the CEO. This applies for all the assets of the company, like the business aircraft.

The corporate aircraft and flight department use resources. If they are not adding value to the corporation, they are not needed and should be gone. It is up to you to maximize the value of yourself and the business aircraft your operate.

Organizations and groups like NBAA, GAMA, AOPA, No Plane No Gain and others all provide us with great examples justifying and proving the worth of business aircraft. They start with the obvious, that use of an aircraft maximizes use of time. Most touch on the value of that time to the corporation. But as members of the aviation department, you need to take that generalization and make it apply to your corporation. 

Understand how the use of business aircraft adds value to your company. What are the unique benefits that your business aircraft adds to the accomplishment of your company's goals?  Yes, the aircraft allows for more usable time. But who's usable time is being increased and what does the aircraft enable them to do with that time?  Time is a nonrenewable resource. Employees are often called a company's most valued asset. The effective use of an aircraft allows valued employees to effectively use their limited time to drive the profitability of the company. 

Develop ways to measure and document how the aviation department adds value. There are many ways to accomplish this. They need too apply to your situation. If your business is EMS, the measures are different than for a corporate shuttle. If the company is using the aircraft to reach new clients,  can you document this and assign some value? Does your aircraft utilization strategy support the corporate goals and mission?

You need to also understand your costs. What are the costs to operate and own the aircraft? Are you able to minimize the market depreciation on the aircraft by keeping the aircraft updated and in a "ready to sell" condition? Use this to develop a Cost-Benefit Analysis for the aircraft and the aviation department. You may calculate the aviation department has an annual operating budget of $1.75 million. Can you calculate the value to the corporation? If the aircraft use was critical in winning a billion dollar contract, some of the value of that contract can be "awarded" to having the aircraft, no?

Things to consider trying to quantify regarding the contributions of the business aircraft:

- Adding to the company's market share

- Adding to the profitability of the company

- Enabling the (key) employees to maximize use of their time

- Increasing employee and customer satisfaction or loyalty

- Keeping senior leadership secure 

Whether it is business courses at the local university, online education, or the NBAA CAM program, find and use resources that help you to understand and communicate the "business" part of business aviation. Become a marketer of the aviation department both within the company and within the community. Develop your leadership skills and people skills. Add back more than you consume.

 

Tags:

David Wyndham | Flight Department





GlobalAir.com on Twitter