Welcome to GlobalAir.com | 888-236-4309    Please Register or Login
Aviation Articles
Home Aircraft For Sale  | Aviation Directory  |  Airport Resource  |   Blog  | My Flight Department
Aviation Articles

EAA Airventure Oshkosh 2010 Photos

by GlobalAir.com 30. July 2010 17:58
Share on Facebook

 

 

 

Tags: , , ,

GlobalAir.com | News

Understanding The FAA's New Aircraft Re-Registration And Renewal Requirements

by Greg Reigel 30. July 2010 15:09
Share on Facebook



On July 20, 2010 the FAA published a Final Rule amending the FAA's regulations regarding aircraft registration. As a result, if you own an aircraft that is registered with the FAA's Aircraft Registry (the "Registry") you are going to have to renew the registration for your aircraft.

Background

The Registry is responsible for developing and maintaining the system of registration for United States civil aircraft. One of the Registry's primary responsibilities is to maintain an electronic database for all U.S. registered aircraft. The database identifies each registered aircraft by its registration number (N- number), its complete description, and the name and address of its registered owner.

According to the FAA, "approximately one-third of the 357,000 registered aircraft records it maintains are inaccurate and that many aircraft associated with those records are likely ineligible for United States registration." Although the current regulations require aircraft owners to report the sale of an aircraft, the scrapping or destruction of an aircraft, or a change in the aircraft owner's mailing address, apparently many aircraft owners have not complied with these requirements. As a result, the FAA has implemented its Final Rule to improve the currency and accuracy of the Registry's database.

The Final Rule requires re-registration of all U.S. civil aircraft over a 3 year period in order to update the Registry's database and to enable the Registry to cancel the registrations of those aircraft that are not re-registered. Thereafter, aircraft owners will need to renew their aircraft registrations every 3 years.

The Re-Registration/Renewal Process

Under the Final Rule, aircraft registrations will now be limited to a 3-year period. At the end of each 3-year interval, an aircraft's registration will expire and the aircraft will need to be re-registered. This rule establishes the expiration of registration for all aircraft registered before October 1, 2010, and provides for the re- registration of all aircraft over a 3-year period according a schedule contained in the rule.

For aircraft registered on or after October 1, 2010, the aircraft registration's expiration date will be printed on the registration certificate and will be 3 years from the last day of the month in which registration or re-registration occurred. Once renewed, an aircraft's registration will expire 3 years from the previous expiration date. Replacement registration certificates issued on or after October 1, 2010, will display the same expiration date that was shown on the replaced registration certificate. If the replaced registration certificate did not display an expiration date, the replacement certificate will display an expiration date from the above-schedule based on the month of issue of the replaced registration certificate.

The FAA will issue replacement certificates after an address update, an N-number change, or when a certificate is reported as lost or mutilated. However, it is important to note that a replacement registration certificate will not constitute re-registration or renewal. Similarly, the replacement certificate will not change the registration expiration date applicable to the aircraft at the time the replacement registration certificate is issued.

When an aircraft's registration is approaching expiration, the Registry will send an aircraft owner two reminder notices. The first reminder notice will be sent 180 days before an aircraft's registration is scheduled to expire. This notice will identify the aircraft, its expiration date, and the 3-month filing window during which a registration or renewal application should be submitted. It will also provide instructions for completing the registration or renewal process.

In order to receive a new registration certificate before the old certificate expires, an aircraft owner will need to file the re-registration or renewal application within the assigned window. However, once an aircraft has completed re-registration and is approaching a required renewal, the aircraft owner may submit the required renewal information as soon as the first reminder notice is received.

The Registry will send a second reminder notice at the end of the 3-month filing window if the aircraft owner has not yet re-registered or renewed the aircraft's registration. The 3- month filing window will close 2 months prior to the scheduled expiration date for the aircraft's registration to allow the Registry sufficient time to process the application and mail the new certificate. If an aircraft owner files an applications after the filing window has closed, the application will still be processed; however, the new certificate may not arrive until after the current certificate has expired.

To avoid confusion between the normal registration process and the re-registration process, the Aircraft Registration Application, AC Form 8050-1, will not be used for re-registration. The Registry has created a separate application form that will be available online, here. Aircraft owners should be aware that the re-registration/renewal application does not grant any temporary authority for operation of an aircraft, unlike that provided by retaining the pink copy of Form 8050-1. As a result, if a re-registration/renewal application is filed late and a new registration certificate is not received by the time the current registration certificate expires, the aircraft owner would not be able to operate the aircraft between the time when the current certificate expires and when the new certificate is received.

The Final Rule provides for both online re-registration and renewal when no changes are required. However, if changes to the registration are required (e.g. address change, etc.), then the re-registration/renewal application may not be submitted online and must be mailed to the Registry. According to the Final Rule, the Registry will post information on its website identifying aircraft as they move through the various stages of re-registration and renewal so aircraft owners and other interested parties can track the process.

Aircraft owners will need to pay $5.00 to re-register their aircraft and then another $5.00 each time the aircraft's registration is renewed. (Although this doesn't seem like a lot of money, unfortunately the registration and administrative fees may increase over time, depending upon whether the latest version of the FAA reauthorization bill passes. Under that bill, the FAA would be required to increase fees to $130 for initial registration and $45 for renewals.)

Consequences For Failure To Re-Register/Renew

If an aircraft owner fails to re-register or renew an aircraft's registration, the registration will not end immediately. Rather, the Registry will wait 30 days to ensure that any late filed requests from the aircraft owner have been processed. In the absence of such requests, and assuming the Registry has a good address on file for the aircraft owner, the Registry will then send a letter to the aircraft owner providing notice of the pending cancellation of the aircraft's registration. The aircraft owner will then have 60 days within which to reserve the N-number or register the aircraft. If the Registry does not receive a reply within 60 days, the aircraft's registration will then be cancelled. If the Registry does not have a good address for the aircraft owner, cancellation of the aircraft's registration will be scheduled for no sooner than 90 days from the date of expiration. Once an aircraft's registration is cancelled, the N-number will be unavailable for assignment for a period of 5 years.

Conclusion

The Final Rule is effective October 1, 2010. Thus, all aircraft owners will need to comply. How can you minimize the hassle associated with the Final Rule? First, since the re-registration notice will be sent to the address on file with the Registry, verify now that your address in the Registry is correct. If you need to update the information, you can do that directly with the Registry or through an aviation attorney. Second, submit your application as early as possible once you receive your first reminder notice to allow the Registry time to process and mail your new registration.

If you follow these steps, hopefully the re-registration/renewal process will be nothing more than a minor inconvenience. And, as always, if you have problems contact an aviation attorney for help.

NASCAR's Roush involved in crash landing at Airventure Oshkosh

by GlobalAir.com 27. July 2010 22:50
Share on Facebook


A Beechcraft Premier shortly before crash landing at Airventure.

 


Dust and wreckage following impact.

A Beechcraft Premier Jet broke apart after landing hard Tuesday evening at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisc.

The incident, which occurred around 6 p.m. Central Time, took place during the annual EAA Airventure event that draws tens of thousands daily to the airport each summer.

During the festival where pilots travel to daily and air shows highlight the afternoons, the field’s aircraft control tower is considered the busiest in the world.

Witnesses said the Premier Jet appeared to overextend the runway centerline while turning base on its final approach. It then appeared to overcorrect and apparently spun out of control before breaking in two, several witnesses said.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the official cause of the incident.

A statement from the EAA (Experimental Aircraft Association) said two occupants were on board, Jack Roush of Northville, Mich., and Brenda Strickland of Plymouth, Mich.

Roush is CEO and co-owner NASCAR’s Roush Fenway Racing. A Beechcraft Premier registered to the company is located in the FAA aircraft database.

Rescue crews transported both occupants to local hospitals, an EAA statement said, with Roush reportedly being in serious-but-stable condition Tuesday night and Strickland suffering non-life-threatening injuries.

Tags: , , , , ,

GlobalAir.com | News

Aircraft Technical Analysis Tips

by David Wyndham 25. July 2010 13:31
Share on Facebook

When evaluating aircraft, we tend to focus in on the things we know best. Once we get a feel for those, we then hope the other information we turn up is OK as well. When I’m working with a financial type, she’s interested not in how fast the aircraft flies, but in the costs, how we account for major maintenance, what we show for the acquisition price, etc. With the pilots, we focus in on the specs and performance, the technical analysis.
 
With the pilot, we focus in on size, features, range, and performance. The mission drives these requirements. Many of the aircraft acquisition plans we do focus on requirements such as passenger seating, cabin size and range. The general way we approach this is to:
 
* Determine the most (likely) demanding payload, range, cabin size and/or passenger seating requirement as defined by your key mission.
 
* Compare those mandatory requirements against the capabilities of a range of aircraft from the sources of information you have gathered.
 
* Eliminate all those that do not meet the requirements.
 
* Eliminate those aircraft that are vastly more capable than required. The cost of acquisition and ownership does up dramatically as size, range and speed increase.
 
Here is where it can get tough. Just how are the numbers derived? I’ve had pilots distrust our data initially until we’ve discussed the ground rules used.
 
If you need a range of 1,450 nautical miles (NM) with four passengers, what exactly do you mean? For the range, do you mean VFR range? IFR range? IFR range with what sort of alternate airport? 100 NM alternate, 200 NM alternate, something else? In general, literature on turboprops and very light and light jets refer to ranges with a 100 NM alternate that follows the NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve format. Somewhere in the light jet category, the 200 NM alternate becomes “standard.”  Our numbers for an aircraft such as the PC 12 are with a 200 NM NBAA IFR Fuel Reserves. Very different than IFR 45-minutes that an owner-pilot may be thinking about.
 
Passengers are passengers, right? No. Most published data assumes each passenger (with bags) weights 200 lbs. But some data may refer to 170 lb passengers, while the FAA and airline data suggest the average American airline passenger with bags runs well over 200 lbs. So when we discuss how far with how many passengers, I like to make sure that we are talking about 800 lbs instead of four passengers.
 
The same passenger weight comment applies to the Basic Operating Weight (BOW) of the aircraft as well. BOW includes crew. Is your aircraft to be flown single pilot or with two pilots? That 200 lb difference in weight can, when carrying near full loads, mean 200 lbs plus or minus on the fuel load, or almost 30 gallons. If your aircraft burns 120 gallons/hour at 240 knots, 30 gallons is 20 minutes or 80 NM. That may be enough to move the aircraft from acceptable to not acceptable due to its range.
 
The last area where things can be confusing is that much of the published data on aircraft are “maximums” and may not be achievable under most conditions. As an example, the Certified Ceiling is the maximum ceiling the aircraft is certified to be able to operate safety. That does not mean that the aircraft can climb that high on an everyday basis. Just because the aircraft has a Service Ceiling of 51,000 feet does not mean that the aircraft routinely flies there.
 
We look at Service Ceiling at max take-off weight. How high can the aircraft initially climb? The 51,000 certified jet may initially climb to 43,000 feet, where it sits until it can step climb the FL450, then FL470. That initial figure is a good basis for comparison, one I favor over an absolute maximum.
 
When evaluating aircraft performance and technical specifications, you need to understand the assumptions that went into the number. Especially as they relate to your aircraft requirements. When comparing data for different aircraft, you need to have the data based on the same assumptions – the old “apples-to-apples” comparison.

Tags: , , , , ,

David Wyndham

EAA Airventure Oshkosh Preview and Schedule

by Josh 23. July 2010 16:40
Share on Facebook

The curtain is now prepared to open for EAA Airventure in Oshkosh, Wisc., next week, albeit on what has been a soggy airfield. Nearly a foot of rain has fallen in the area this month. The rain clouds appear ready to depart eastern Wisconsin next week, despite floodwaters forcing Milwaukee’s General Mitchell International Airport (MKE) to close Friday and more rain was expected in the area into early Saturday.

Sunny weather, however, is expected to prevail in the Oshkosh area during Airventure, with pleasant highs near 80 each day and no more than a 40 percent chance of a storm on any given day, primarily mid-week. Hopefully, it stays perfect for the daily air shows.

With mostly blue skies ahead, we can begin planning for what should be an exciting week. The images in this post are from last year’s show. We here at GlobalAir.com anticipate even more fun this year. Stop by and visit us at Hangar D, Booth 4028. Once you get there, here are a few highlights for the week ahead.

This Weekend
Mass arrivals of aircraft will land in the area throughout the next three days. The Piper Cherokees arrived this afternoon, with Beechcraft Bonanzas, Cessnas and Mooneys to land tomorrow. Stinsons and Comanches arrive along with the Airventure Cup racers on Sunday.


Monday, July 26
Opening Day includes an evening performance by classic-rock band Chicago, but if you are in the mood for some tunes earlier in the day, check out Ravi “The Raviator,” a member of the Flying Musicians. The first performance is 11 a.m. at the Senheiser tent, outside of Hangar A. Repeat shows take place at noon Thursday and Friday.

Ford Motor Co. will sponsor its Wings Vs. Wheels challenge at 3:15 p.m., as a Roush 540RH and Shelby GT350 go head to head against the Red Bull Edge 540 and Castrol Aviator’s Extra 330SC. Ford, as posted on our blog recently, will auction off a Mustang during Airventure that is modeled after the SR-71.

Tuesday, July 27
The theme for the 2010 event is “A Salute to Veterans,” a prominent message displayed in ceremonies and displays throughout the week. Each morning features a nostalgic look at the history of wartime aviation with “Warbirds in Review.”  Tuesday’s edition features two sessions, the early installment with a pair of Old Crow P-51s and an afternoon event highlighted by D-Day paratroopers Col. Ed Shames and 1st Lt. Fred Bahlau with the C-47 Tico Belle.

Later in the afternoon, the "Max Effort" Air Show will feature a DC-3/C-47 formation. Among other events, Daher-Socata holds a news conference in AeroShell Square at 9:30 a.m. with Nicolas Chabbert, President of SOCATA North America, speaking.

 


 

Wednesday, June 28
Cessna Aircraft will host a Tweet-Up and doughnut breakfast at 9 a.m. Flightglobal senior tech artist Joe Picarella will sign free copies of the Citation Mustang edition of his cutaway aircraft illustrations.

Embraer will have a Phenom 100 and Phenom 300 on display throughout the week.  Luis Carlos Affonso, executive vice president of executive jets for the company, speaks at the Embraer booth at 2 p.m.

Continuing with the Salute to Veterans theme, U.S. Army Capt. Brian Brennan, recipient of a Bronze Star and Purple Heart, speaks at 1 p.m. at the B&S Aircraft booth. He was injured by an IED in Afghanistan, losing both his legs and remaining unresponsive for 23 days until Gen. David Petraeus visited him in the hospital and said the word “Currahee,” the motto of Brennan’s unit, the 101st Airborne. The phrase means, “stands alone.” Hearing those words, Brennan tried to sit up to attention. He is on hand at the booth each morning to share his story.

 

 

Thursday, July 29
An "Old Glory Honor Flight" to Washington, D.C. departs 8 a.m., and an afternoon air show features classic warbird jets.

EAA Young Eagles Co-Chairmen Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and Jeff Skiles, his first officer on US Airways flight 1549, the “Miracle on the Hudson,” appear together at Forum Pavilion 7 to talk about their experiences since that fateful water landing.


Friday, July 30

A "Parade of Veterans" at 2 p.m. concludes with a photo of all veterans gathered. A "Missing Man" formation also takes place. Actor and veterans advocate Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band perform Friday evening.

 

The world premiere of "Pearl" plays at the Fly-In Theater. It tells the story of story of Pearl Carter Scott, a Chickasaw aviatrix who was the youngest licensed pilot in the United States.

 

Saturday, July 31

A big weekend finale includes a rare nighttime air show, featuring a "Wall of Fire" and fireworks display.

 

The Spirit of Aviation Auction features aircraft for sale. Another afternoon air show is loaded with pyrotechnics and pays homage to warbirds. Nine-time Grammy winner Asleep at the Wheel performs at 6:30 p.m.


Sunday, Aug. 1
Closing day is Family Day, as those between six and 18 years of age enjoy free admission. As there also is on Saturday, an early morning mass balloon launch commences.

 

An early warbird air show includes the Japanese Nakajima A6M2 Model 21 Zero. The afternoon show is entitled “Warbird Aerobatics.”

 

For a complete rundown of daily events and maps, visit this page and this page on the Airventure web site. Additional workshops and activities can be found here.

Tags: , , , , ,

GlobalAir.com | News



Archive



GlobalAir.com on Twitter