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Boeing Delivers First BBJ 747-8 with Aeroloft System

by GlobalAir.com 31. August 2012 12:18
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Article by: Chad Trautvetter
FMI: www.ainonline.com

Yesterday Boeing delivered a Boeing Business Jet 747-8 with the first Greenpoint Technologies Aeroloft system, which provides an extra 393 sq ft of cabin space (for a total of 5,179 sq ft) via the addition of a loft area above the main cabin between the upper deck and tail. It was installed by Boeing Global Transport & Executive Systems in Wichita.


The Aeroloft features eight private sleeping berths and a changing room. According to BBJ president Steve Taylor, “The Aeroloft is one of the more innovative and exciting projects on which we’ve collaborated with Greenpoint. We’re certain all the BBJ 747-8 customers receiving the Aeroloft will be thrilled with [it].” Two more BBJ 747-8s with the Aeroloft system are scheduled to be delivered by year-end.

After a ceremony in Wichita with the airplane’s undisclosed customer, Taylor and BBJ chief pilot Rene Gonzales flew the BBJ 747-8 to Lufthansa Technik in Hamburg, Germany, for completion of its interior. The quad-jet arrived today in Hamburg, and Lufthansa Technik has already started completions work. The BBJ is scheduled to enter service in mid-2014.

To date, said Boeing Business Jets, nine BBJ 747-8s have been sold to head-of-state customers.

(Image Credit: www.ainonline.com)

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Pilot To Fly Cessna On Fuel From Melted Plastic

by GlobalAir.com 30. August 2012 11:52
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Article by Glenn Pew, Contributing Editor, Video Editor
Brought to you by: www.avweb.com

British pilot Jeremy Roswell hopes this November to fly 10,000 miles from Sydney to London in a diesel Cessna 182 burning petroleum fuel processed from waste plastics. The fuel has been developed by Cynar Plc, an Irish company that uses a process called pyrolysis to melt down plastic trash into a petroleum distillate. That product can be separated into various fuels, including a viable aviation fuel, according to the company, which says it has already tested its fuel in cars. Roswell's flight will require more than 1,000 gallons of the fuel to make his flight. And Cynar will require roughly five tons of plastic garbage to make Roswell's fuel. The company says its plastic waste diesel fuel is cleaner than conventional Jet A, its production process is cleaner, still, and it estimates a low cost per gallon in production. That said, it has expressed awareness of some potential limitations.

According to Cynar, its pyrolysis technique, which melts plastics in an anaerobic environment, creates no emissions, and a report published in November 2011 put the cost to produce one gallon of Cyn-Diesel at $1.50. As an aviation fuel, "It'll need testing and trials, but for a diesel engine not going beyond 8,000 feet, it should be fine," Cynar CEO Michael Murray told BusinessGreen.com. Roswell plans to cruise at 5,000 feet, flying roughly 13 hours each day. He will attempt to fit the 10,000-mile trip into a six-day adventure with stops at Darwin, Christmas Island, Sri Lanka, Jordan, and Malta. Roswell told the company his objective is to prove the viability of synthetic fuel made from plastic waste "and by doing so replace the need to use fossil fuels from conventional sources." According to Cynar, there are 26 million tons of plastics feeding U.S. landfills each year, backed by another 15 million tons headed each year to landfills in Europe. Says Murray, "I think [the fuel] can be a viable alternative if the industry adopts diesel-type engines." One plant that already exists in Ireland can process 20 tons of sorted plastics per year, producing 1.5 million gallons of fuel, according to the report titled, "Converting End of Life Plastic into Diesel The Cynar Experience" (PDF).

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Split Second Weightlessness; Nobody Panic!

by keely 30. August 2012 10:15
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What is a stall? When someone refers to something as “stalling” what do you typically think of?

         A stall is something that I have always thought of as one of those “uh-oh” moments in life. This is one of those oh so special split second decision moments where you suddenly realize that you have done something silly or careless. You immediately go into panic-apology mode and begin rationalizing possible ways to go about eradicating whatever mistake you have just made.

         Somewhere in between my discovery flight and lesson 4, power-off stalls were introduced to me. These are also known as approach to landing stalls; this is due to the location where they are most prevalent and most likely to happen. Now, I am certainly no professional by any stretch of the word, but any time I’m 5,000 feet above ground level and someone tells me they want to “power off” anything, I freak out a little bit. Call me queasy, but this was something new. After several failed attempts to get out of it, I realized that this was just going to be another one of those things in life that I had to do. Upon learning of its utter magnitude throughout my private pilot training and inevitability in the end, during my check ride I decided to give in. Being the colossal fan of Google.com that I am, my first approach was to “Google” this new topic. Thanks to Dictionary.com, this is what I found:

Stall:

  • To stop running as a result of mechanical failure

  • To halt the motion or progress of; bring to a standstill. To cause a motor (or motor vehicle) to accidentally to stop running.

  • To cause (an aircraft) to go into a stall.


  • In the wild world of aviation; a stall refers to “a condition in which an aircraft or airfoil experiences an interruption of airflow resulting in loss of lift and a tendency to drop.”

    “As the wing angle of attack (AOA) increases to or beyond the critical AOA (approximately 16-20°), smooth airflow over the wing is disrupted, resulting in great increase in drag and loss of lift: a stall”


             Great, this is just exactly what my instincts as well as my stomach (which, during the actual stall was floating somewhere in my throat) had told me about this situation.” I thought. In that actual moment, I thought for sure I was going to die. Why in the world would this ever be a good idea? Better question, why in the world is this happening to me prior to completing lesson 4 of my flight training?

             Well let me tell you why. Most aircraft accidents occur either during a takeoff or during a landing. Being aware of the hazards associated with these phases of flight and knowing how to get yourself out of a bad situation can only make your flights safer. Power-off stalls simulate what would happen if ever there was an occurrence where the pilot was flying too slowly during the landing phase of the flight. The primary objective of a stall during training is to enhance safety in the student right away by helping assure inadvertent stall avoidance and/or prompt stall recovery. In order to assure stall avoidance the student pilot is responsible for understanding any and all flight situations where an unintentional stall may occur. Also, it is necessary to grasp the relationship of various factors relative to stall speed (Vs), be able to properly recognize the first indications of a stall as well as the proper recovery technique.

             Other things to be aware of as the pilot in charge include the relevant aerodynamic factors, flight situations, recovery procedures, as well as the hazards of uncoordinated stalling. Select entry altitude allowing recovery above 1,500 feet above ground level. Carefully watch your approach or landing configuration with throttle reduced or set to idle, straight glide with 30o, +10o bank while continuing to maintain attitude (this will induce a full stall.) Promptly recover by decreasing AOA, leveling wings, and adjusting power as necessary to regain normal attitude, retract flaps as well as gear and reestablish a climb. Finally, avoid a secondary stall, excessive airspeed or altitude loss, spins, or flight below 1,500 feet above ground level. As a student pilot performing a power off stall your objective is to familiarize yourself with the conditions that may produce a stall. Develop knowledge and skill in recognizing imminent and full stalls, as well as the well known habit of taking prompt preventive or corrective action. Overall, the objective of a power-off stall is to understand what could happen if controls were improperly used during a turn from the base leg to the final approach or on the final approach.

             In conclusion, I remember my very first power-off stall vividly! It was tremendously terrifying and I thought with sincere certainty that it would be the first and last of my approach to landing stalls. Clearly, my instructor handled the situation better than I had expected and was able to operate the vehicle enough to maneuver us out of that stall. Since then I have learned how to maneuver myself out of these stalls and usually am asked to perform at least one each time I fly. Not to worry, they absolutely have held onto me with full intensity and each power-off stall that I perform leaved me singed with virtually the same streak of fear. My stomach hovers and I panic for a split second in time, for fear that I may not recover. For now, I take it with a grain of salt. I bite my tongue, hold my breath and thrust the yolk forward with all I’ve got; hoping the little airplane and my instructor will have my back. One day I will be asked to perform such a task without Mr. Frames by my side; until then, well wish me luck!

    This is me and this is my story about approach to landing stalls. But I’m curious; do other pilots have similar fears upon performing their very first power-off stalls? Do older, professional pilots even remember their first power-off stall? I would like to ask my viewers, what are your thoughts and insights regarding these terrifying first few hours of flight training?

     

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    Plane makes emergency landing on highway, no injuries

    by GlobalAir.com 29. August 2012 10:36
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    Article By: Scott Adkins

    SELLERSBURG, IN (WAVE) - A pilot and passenger walked away without injuries after making an emergency landing on Highway 60 in Sellersburg.

    The plane ran out of fuel, according to the passenger on board. It happened near Future Drive and Exit 7 on Interstate 65. The pilot clipped a truck as it touched down and caused minimal damage, according to Indiana State Police. Troopers said there are a few scrapes on the truck's hood, but that is the only visible damage.
     
    A police escort guided the pilot as he drove it to Clark County Regional Airport where an FAA investigation will continue.

    Copyright 2012 WAVE News. All rights reserved.

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    NTSB Says Trim Tab Separation Caused Reno Accident

    by GlobalAir.com 28. August 2012 10:52
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    Modifications To Galloping Ghost Weakened The Airplane Structurally
    Article by: www.aero-news.net
    FMI: Report Synopsis

    The NTSB determined at a meeting Monday in Washington, D.C. that deteriorated locknut inserts found in the highly modified North American P-51D airplane that crashed during the 2011 National Championship Air Races in Reno, Nevada, allowed the trim tab attachment screws to become loose, and even initiated fatigue cracking in one screw. This condition, which resulted in reduced stiffness in the elevator trim system, ultimately led to aerodynamic flutter at racing speed that broke the trim tab linkages, resulting in a loss of controllability and the eventual crash.


    On September 16, 2011, as the experimental single-seat P-51D airplane “The Galloping Ghost,” traveling about 445 knots, or 512 mph, in the third lap of the six-lap race, passed pylon 8, it experienced a left-roll upset and high-G pitch up. During the upset sequence, the airplane’s vertical acceleration peaked at 17.3 G, causing incapacitation of the pilot. Seconds later, a section of the left elevator trim tab separated in flight. The airplane descended and impacted the ramp in the spectator box seating area, killing the pilot and 10 spectators and injuring more than 60 others.

    “In Reno, the fine line between observing risk and being impacted by the consequences when something goes wrong was crossed,” said NTSB Chairman Deborah A. P. Hersman. “The pilots understood the risks they assumed; the spectators assumed their safety had been assessed and addressed.”

    Contributing to the accident were the undocumented and untested major modifications made to the airplane, as well as the pilot’s operation of the airplane in the unique air racing environment without adequate flight testing.

    The nearly 70-year-old airplane had undergone numerous undocumented modifications. The modifications, designed to increase speed, included shortening of the wings, installation of a boil-off cooling system for the engine, increasing the elevator counterweights, modification of the pitch trim system, and changing the incidence of the horizontal and vertical stabilizers.

    "If you want to go out and fly fast and try to win, that's one thing," said Board Member Robert Sumwalt. "If you're modifying an aircraft without fully understanding how the modifications can affect the aerodynamics, you're playing Russian roulette."

    Although the FAA required that a flight standards district office be notified in writing of any major changes made to The Galloping Ghost before it could be flown, investigators could find no records that such notifications were made except for the installation of the boil-off cooling system. The undocumented major modifications were identified through wreckage examinations, photographic evidence, and interviews with ground crewmembers.

    In April, while the investigation was ongoing and after the NTSB’s investigative hearing in January on air race and air show safety, the NTSB issued 10 safety recommendations to the Reno Air Racing Association, the National Air racing Group Unlimited Division, and the FAA. These recommendations addressed:

    •Requiring engineering evaluations for aircraft with major modifications.
    •Raising the level of safety for spectators and personnel near the race course.
    •Improving FAA guidance for air race and course design.
    •Providing race pilots with high-G training and evaluating the feasibility of G-suit requirements for race pilots.
    •Tracking the resolution of race aircraft discrepancies identified during prerace technical inspections.

    Although no additional safety recommendations were issued Monday, the Board reclassified nine existing recommendations. Most are considered closed by the board after "acceptable action" on the part of the parties named in those recommendations. Recommendations dealing with eligibility requirements for aircraft with major modifications (A 12 9 and A-12-13) are now classified “Open—Acceptable Response”. A tenth safety recommendation, issued to the FAA, which addressed air race and course design guidance was reclassified as “Open—Acceptable Response” on July 25, 2012.

    “It’s good news for the air races that so many of our recommendations have been addressed,” said Chairman Hersman. “We will continue to push for the full implementation of all of our safety recommendations.”

    (Video Credit: www.avweb.com)

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