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Fuller To Step Down As AOPA President And CEO

by GlobalAir.com 28. February 2013 15:43
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Fuller To Step Down As AOPA President And CEO
Board of Trustees to Conduct National Search for Successor

Frederick, MD -Craig L. Fuller, president and chief executive officer of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the world's largest aviation association, has notified AOPA's Board of Trustees of his intent to step down from his position and from the Board. He plans to remain in his current role until a successor is ready to assume the position. The Board will conduct a national search for his successor. Following the decision to leave AOPA, the succession process was developed by working together, said William C. Trimble III, Chairman of the Board.

Fuller, who took office January 1, 2009 and is only the fourth president of AOPA since the association's founding nearly 75 years ago, will assist with the search for a new president and the transition to a new administration.

In conveying his decision to the Board of Trustees, Fuller, 62, noted that he made a five-year commitment to AOPA when he was appointed president. As he approaches the fulfillment of that commitment, he said he is looking forward to taking on new challenges and opportunities. "I have flown since age 17, and flying has been part of my life ever since. I will always be grateful to the AOPA Board of Trustees for having given me the opportunity to serve the general aviation community and AOPA's 385,000 members in a leadership position," said Fuller. "It has been a privilege to work with my colleagues on a strong set of initiatives that have built on the decades of hard work by AOPA Trustees and members of the management team. With the end of my five-year commitment approaching, this is an appropriate time for me to consider new opportunities and allow the Board time to recruit a successor.

"The process of finding a new leader can now go forward as all of us at AOPA roll up our sleeves to fight the day to day battles that seem to keep coming our way," said Fuller. "The team will not miss a beat this year as we lay the groundwork for the future."

"During his more than four years as president of AOPA, Craig served nobly and professionally. He has advocated strongly on behalf of the general aviation community in Washington, built bridges with the other aviation associations, improved member communications and generated promising ideas for tomorrow," said Trimble. "We recognize the importance of finding a leader who can continue to inspire all of us in these challenging times. We are focused on finding a leader who shares our vision and convictions as well as the talent and capabilities necessary to achieve our goals."

Trimble, who has chaired the AOPA Board of Trustees since 2005, said the Board will form a search committee shortly and retain an executive search firm to begin looking for AOPA's new leader.

Since 1939, AOPA has protected the freedom to fly for thousands of aviators and aircraft owners. From its headquarters in Frederick Md., offices in Washington, D.C. and seven regions of the U.S., its representatives interact with local, state and federal elected officials and government representatives to ensure the safe and steady growth of general aviation. AOPA offers members a variety services, including flight planning products, safety seminars and studies and publications, as well as insurance, legal, aircraft financing and title services.

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Contact:

Katie Pribyl

301-695-2150
katie.pribyl@aopa.org

FMI: www.avweb.com
Visit: www.aopa.org

FAA Publishes Clarification Regarding Fuel Reimbursement Exemption For Charitable Medical Flights

by Greg Reigel 28. February 2013 10:05
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On February 22, 2013, the FAA published a Policy Clarification on Charitable Medical Flights addressing the reimbursement of fuel expenses for pilot's flying charitable medical flights. As you may recall, 14 C.F.R. 61.113 prohibits a private pilot from acting as pilot in command of an aircraft that is carrying passengers or property for compensation or hire and, for any other flight carrying passengers, a private pilot may not pay less than his or her pro rata share of the operating expenses (fuel oil, airport expenditures, or rental fees). In order to pay less than his or her pro rata share the pilot would have to hold a commercial pilot certificate. As a result, up until recently private pilots operating charitable medical flights could not receive reimbursement for their fuel etc. without complying with Section 61.113, which defeated the purpose of a "charitable" medical flight.

However, Section 821 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 addressed the situation and now requires that the FAA allow an aircraft owner or operator to accept reimbursement from a volunteer pilot organization (such as Angel Flight, Wings of Mercy etc.) for the fuel costs associated with a flight operation to provide transportation for an individual or organ for medical purposes. In order to take advantage of this law, volunteer pilot organizations have petitioned the FAA for exemptions from the requirements of Section 61.113(c) so that their pilots can be reimbursed for some or all of the expenses they incur while flying these flights, since reimbursement for the flights would otherwise be prohibited by Section 61.113(c).

The FAA will issue these exemptions if the applying volunteer pilot organization complies with the following conditions and limitations by:

  1. Developing of a pilot qualification and training program;

  2. Authenticating pilots' FAA certification;

  3. Requiring flight release documentation;

  4. Imposing minimum pilot qualifications (flight hours, recency of experience, etc.);

  5. Requiring a 2nd class FAA medical certificate;

  6. Requiring the filing of an instrument flight plan for each flight;

  7. Restricting pilots to flight and duty time limitations;

  8. Requiring mandatory briefings for passengers;

  9. Imposing higher aircraft airworthiness requirements; and

  10. Requiring higher instrument flight rules (IFR) minimums.

Although these are the current restrictions, the various volunteer pilot organizations and the Air Car Alliance are continuing to work with the FAA to reduce these burdens that are placed on volunteer pilots and organizations who reimburse fuel. Fortunately, the FAA has indicated that it "will continuously update these conditions and limitations as necessary to best ensure these operations meet this equivalent level of safety." Hopefully those discussions will be productive and meaningful. But for now, fuel reimbursement should be available if the conditions for an exemption are met.

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Greg Reigel

GlobalAir.com Announced to Board of KIAE

by GlobalAir.com 21. February 2013 15:44
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GlobalAir.com is pleased to announce Jeffrey Carrithers, president and CEO to the board of the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education (KIAE).

Louisville, Kentucky. (Feb. 21, 2013) – GlobalAir.com, a leading web-based aviation information website, is pleased to announce Jeffrey Carrithers, president and CEO of Globalair.com has been appointed to the board of the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education (KIAE). The KIAE program caters to high school students who wish to pursue careers in the aviation industry. The KIAE mission is to improve student learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and create career pathways in aerospace throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

As the program continues to grow, the KIAE requires a strong board of members to help drive students to success in multiple fields of aviation knowledge. Flight department heads, UPS pilots, aviation mechanics, and flight instructors are among the board as well. Similar to any other field of knowledge, aviation offers a large variety of potential, as well as positions and career employment opportunities. At the beginning of each calendar year, the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education’s board is assessed and made stronger; this year’s additions were no different. Mr. Carrithers was brought onto the board for his extended knowledge in aviation business, including advertising, web development, web design, marketing, public relations, etc. The director of the KIAE, Tim Smith has said “Jeff brings aviation business careers to the institute; this is something that is relatively new this year. Jeff offers an expanded wealth of knowledge regarding the “suit and tie” side of aviation.“

Carrithers notes, “The KIAE program is one of the most unique curriculums I have seen in any education system, much less in an aviation environment. One of the hardest jobs our teachers have is discovering how to engage their students”. He continues, “Engaging our youth in mathematics and physics is difficult. KIAE shows students these principles through aviation and how they work in everyday life applications. From preliminary reports we have seen thus far, this program is really working”. The KIAE program caters to high school students from twenty different high schools throughout Kentucky and southern Indiana; thus making up for twenty-five percent of the high school aerospace participants nationwide. KIAE is working hard to motivate young adults as they achieve their aerospace career goals.

About the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education
Tim Smith founded KIAE in 2010 while he was searching to find a method of teaching that would allow students to engage in fun, yet educational activities; both inside as well as outside of the classroom. What Tim found was a self-produced program commonly referred to as STEM learning. The STEM program was developed to reach out to students providing hands-on training in various aviation career fields. Tim would however, be sure to include science, technology, engineering and mathematics; thus making up the four letters of “STEM.” Due primarily to the STEM learning system, the KIAE was built, incorporating airworthy/part 91 certified aircraft that students worked to build for themselves. Educators hope to use the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education hand in hand with the STEM program to change state testing scores as well as motivate students to get excited about aviation. Aviation is an attainable goal; especially for high school students who have been offered this opportunity to jump start their careers. Not only are they given guidance from real life aviation professionals, but they are granted a scholarship and inevitably a chance to change their lives. For more information regarding the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education please visit kiae.org.

About GlobalAir.com
Based in Louisville, Kentucky, GlobalAir.com serves the general aviation, business aircraft, and regional airline communities by offering clients and online visitors a wide range of premium aircraft and aviation-related data and services. Services offered by GlobalAir.com include Aircraft Exchange (www.globalair.com/aircraft_for_sale) which lists aircraft for sale or lease, Airport Resource Center (ARC) (www.globalair.com/airport) that displays U.S. airport data, as well as the flight path planning application Max-Trax (www.airportfuelprices.com). Each of GlobalAir.com’s websites receives more than 300,000 visitors per month and helps connect the aviation industry. For more information regarding GlobalAir.com, visit www.globalair.com, e-mail webmaster@globalair.com, or call 888-236-4309.

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Contact for Further Information

Jeffrey Carrithers

Globalair.com
888-236-4309
Jeffrey@ganmail.com
www.Globalair.com

Tim Smith
Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education
502-320-9490
tim@kiae.org
www.kiae.org

So You Think You Want To Be A Pilot: The Commercial Cargo Pilot

by keely 4. February 2013 15:46
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    Pi•lot
  • One who operates or is licensed to operate an aircraft in flight.
  • One who guides or directs a course of action for others.
  • Serving or leading as guide.
     Pilots are people too, right? They’re people who happen to venture high in the sky in search of adrenaline, speed and worldly travels. The strange part is, less than 0.1 percent of people in the world will actually take the necessary steps of action to learn to fly an aircraft; an even smaller percentage of people will become professional pilots.

    No matter how you see it, each pilot's journey is bound to begin in generally the same way, via a single piston engine aircraft. “We must walk before we can run.”

     For young Gary Katz, one flight was all it took and he was sold. Gary was young and certainly impressionable on the day of his very first flight; nonetheless, in the back seat of that dusty old Cessna aircraft, his life was changed for the better. It was because of Gary’s father that he initially became engaged in flight and it was by his father’s suggestion that he eventually enrolled into The Civil Air Patrol.
     With years came wisdom, and as Gary grew, so did his passion for flight. After college, Gary went to work for a small, locally owned airport outside of Cincinnati, Ohio. This is where he learned to fly. Once Gary completed his pilot training, he accepted a job as a flight instructor and continued logging hours and experience while he shared his newfound talent with young, ambitious pilots that came his way. A few years later Gary Katz took on a new type of piloting job where he flew cancelled checks in twin engine Cessna airplanes for a company that provided international express mail services. This was a rather enjoyable job indeed, however, the maintenance of the aircraft was subpar and that made him feel somewhat uneasy about taking long trips. Eventually Gary continued forward with his career and began flying for an airline headquartered in Orlando, Florida. Finally, in 1989 Gary hooked the fish that sank the boat and was hired to fly cargo for UPS out of Louisville, Kentucky. This time, Gary flies primarily domestic cargo in DC-8 aircraft that are all maintained superbly and very well kept. Also, due to the UPS scheduling system, Gary receives a fairly negotiable schedule that keeps him at home with his family as much as possible.
     The more I learned about the life of a commercial cargo pilot, the more excited I became. Clearly this would be a rather lofty goal, but as far as a “dream career” goes, I would venture to say the cargo pilot has a seemingly pleasurable day at work. Unfortunately, Gary is “on the road” quite frequently, and his working hours are set up quite differently than your typical 9-5 office position. Nonetheless, Gary says that he thoroughly enjoys his work; and from a student pilot’s perspective, that is very nice to hear. According to Gary, the most difficult part about his job working as a cargo pilot is the time that he must spend apart from his family, as well as the late night shifts that throw off the natural human circadian rhythm. “If that’s the most difficult thing about being a cargo pilot, then I’m in!”

     Also, of course there are certainly perks included in the life of a professional pilot. In Gary’s spare time he has taught his son to fly, passing the talent right down his family line. On weekends he takes trips with his friends and family via his personal Cessna 182. Gary has also successfully developed a volunteer organization known as The Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators. I’m far from the end on my road to discovering the inside scoop on the life of a professional pilot; but this was a fantastic start and I am feeling more inspired than ever! I can’t wait to meet and speak with my next professional pilot. Do you have a good story? I would love to hear from you! Just send me a quick email to keely@globalair.com and tell me all about it! 

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GlobalAir.com

Is A Safety Pilot Acting As A Second In Command? Not Necessarily.

by Greg Reigel 1. February 2013 10:16
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If you are an instrument rated pilot, you know that you have to be "current" in order to legally exercise the privileges of the instrument rating as pilot in command. Specifically, in order to act as pilot in command of an instrument flight FAR § 61.57(c) requires that the airman must have performed and logged (1) six instrument approaches; (2) holding procedures and tasks; and (3) intercepting and tracking courses through the use of navigational electronic systems, all within the preceding 6 calendar months. Although these task may be performed in instrument conditions, they may also be performed in visual conditions by "simulating" instrument conditions.

As you might expect, in order to operate an aircraft in simulated instrument conditions, certain requirements must be met. FAR § 91.109(b) allows this type of operation in an aircraft equipped with fully functioning dual controls as long as ("1) the other control seat is occupied by a safety pilot who possesses at least a private pilot certificate with category and class ratings appropriate to the aircraft being flown; and (2) The safety pilot has adequate vision forward and to each side of the aircraft, or a competent observer in the aircraft adequately supplements the vision of the safety pilot."

Unfortunately, some airman can be confused about the role of the safety pilot during a simulated instrument flight. It isn't uncommon for airmen to refer to their safety pilot as being "second in command." However, unless the aircraft being used is type certificated for operation by more than one pilot or the operation conducted by the pilots requires a designated second in command (e.g. an operation conducted under FAR § 135.101 which requires a second in command for IFR operations), the designation of a safety pilot as an acting second in command crewmember is not accurate.

Now, you might be wondering how a safety pilot may "log" his or her flight time while acting as a safety pilot in that situation. Well, you need to keep in mind that "acting" as a second in command during a flight is different than "logging time" for acting as a safety pilot. Under the regulations, an airman may log second in command time for the portion of the flight during which he or she was acting as safety pilot because the safety pilot was a required flight crewmember for that portion of the flight under FAR § 91.109(b). In that situation the airman is only acting as a safety pilot, not as second in command for the flight.

The distinction between "acting" as second in command, or pilot in command for that matter, versus "logging" second in command or pilot in command time is an important one. Depending upon the circumstances, an airman may be able to both "act" as second in command or pilot in command and "log time" as second in command or pilot in command. In other situations, he or she may only be able to do one or the other.

Although it can be tricky, airmen need to make sure they understand the distinction to ensure that they are logging their time accurately and in compliance with the regulations.

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Greg Reigel



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