July 2013 - Page 2 Aviation Articles

Jetcraft Corporation Introduces HUD Vision Access™ – Based on Kollsman Technology – for Bombardier Challenger 604

FAA STC approval and US dealer network established – sales and installation now available through West Star Aviation

RALEIGH, NC, July 23, 2013 – Jetcraft Corporation and its subsidiary Jetcraft Avionics LLC, today announced that their HUD Vision Access™ system is now available for sale and installation on the Bombardier Challenger 604 (CL604).

Last month, Kollsman announced that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had awarded a “lower landing credit” approved supplemental type certificate (STC) for the Kollsman enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) for the CL604. As a major Kollsman EFVS distributor to the business aviation aftermarket, Jetcraft has commercialized this offering and branded it as HUD Vision Access.

Fully integrated with existing avionics, HUD Vision Access makes the CL604 a more flexible and valuable aircraft by allowing pilots to safely taxi, take-off and land in total darkness, fog, rain, snow, smog and other reduced visibility conditions. Under FAR 91.175, HUD Vision Access permits pilots to descend below decision height (DH/DA) at most airports, reducing the need for ground-based infrastructure. For owners and operators of CL604s, the principal benefits include additional operational credit at more than 4,000 runways across the country, during straight-in approaches with ILS or WAAS-LPV.

Implementation of the HUD Vision Access is a value-adding retrofit for CL604s in-line with the FAA’s new ‘NextGen’ initiative, which places increasing importance on cockpit-based (vs. ground-based) guidance systems.

West Star Aviation, a leading US provider of maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services with multiple authorized locations, has been selected by Jetcraft for system installations. West Star will sell and install HUD Vision Access as an integrated system, provisions or as separate components.

“Jetcraft’s HUD Vision Access system makes the CL604 a more valuable aircraft,” says Chad Anderson, President, Jetcraft Corporation. “Based on our extensive experience in the remarketing of previously-owned business aircraft and independent analysis, we estimate the resale value of HUD Vision Access to be approximately 70% of new. Additionally, HUD Vision Access is a significant differentiator at resale, compared to a similar aircraft without this upgrade. Previously, EFVS was only available on new aircraft sold directly by OEMs. With HUD Vision Access now STC approved on the CL604, we look forward to continuing to work with the Kollsman team to pursue EASA approval and comparable retrofits for aftermarket Bombardier Challenger 605 and CRJ conversion fleets. Working with West Star Aviation to access this game-changing technology enables clients to derive more value from their aircraft investments,” adds Mr. Anderson.

“We are pleased to be the leading installation facilities of Jetcraft’s HUD Vision Access system for CL604s,” continues Greg Byrnes, Senior Vice President, West Star Aviation. “We have considerable expertise with Challengers, specifically including avionics installations. The HUD Vision Access represents a major value-add for aircraft owners and operators. With recent FAA STC approval now established, we are ready to serve the more than 150 CL604 operators registered in the US,” concludes Mr. Byrnes.

About Jetcraft Corporation

Jetcraft Corporation is an international leader in new and pre-owned business aircraft sales, acquisitions and trades. Headquartered in Raleigh, NC, Jetcraft has sales offices/representation in five US cities; Basel and Zurich, Switzerland; Dubai, UAE, Moscow, Russia and Hong Kong, China. The company’s 50-year-plus track record in aircraft transactions has earned it a world class customer base and one of the strongest global networks in the industry. Jetcraft Avionics LLC, a subsidiary of Jetcraft Corporation, provides distribution of enhanced flight vision systems (EFVS) for aftermarket business aircraft using Kollsman’s state-of-the-art EVS-II and AT-HUD. For more information, please visit www.jetcraft.com.

About West Star Aviation

West Star Aviation, Inc. specializes in airframe repair and maintenance, engine repair and maintenance, major modifications, avionics installation and repair, interior refurbishment, paint, parts, surplus avionics sales, window repair, landing gear overhauls and accessory services. The company also provides complete FBO services for transient aircraft at its East Alton, Illinois and Grand Junction, Colorado facilities. For more information, please visit www.weststaraviation.com.

FBO of the Week – Yellowstone Jet Center (BZN)

When you think of the popular attractions in the Northwest,Yellowstone National Park will probably appear near the top of your "must see" list. And if you’re a pilot, one of the best places to start is Yellowstone Jet Center in Belgrade, Montana.

Yellowstone Jet Center, since 2000, has been a destination for travelers seeking Grand Teton and Glacier national parks as well, as well as the Club at Spanish Peaks and the resorts in Big Sky. Named a top 40 FBO by AIN for many years, it’s also a great outlet for golfers, skiers, hunters and fisherman alike to begin their trek.

The Next Generation MD-10 ORBIS Flying Eye Hospital

According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are visually impaired. Of that number 80% of these impairments can be avoided or cured – however, 90% of those afflicted live in developing countries where receiving that care is difficult or almost impossible.

This is where ORBIS International comes in.

ORBIS International is a nonprofit organization that works in developing countries to save sight. ORBIS prevents and treats blindness through hands-on training, public health education, improved access to quality eye care, advocacy and partnerships with local health care organizations. In 1982, its unique aircraft, the Flying Eye Hospital, took to the skies. For the first time ever, a fully-equipped, state-of-the-art teaching hospital had been installed inside an airplane.

Since then, the Flying Eye Hospital has carried out hospital based programs in 92 countries, and has established a long-term presence in the following countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Nepal, Vietnam, Cameroon, Ethiopia, South Africa, Zambia, Peru and Haiti. ORBIS has also used the Flying Eye Hospital and local hospital partners to train 325,000 ophthalmologists, nurses, biomedical engineers and other health care workers to carry out their work, plus has developed an active pool of over 400 doctors, nurses and other eye care specialists from around the world who volunteer to teach during one- to two-week sight-saving programs.

ORBIS medical faculty also train local doctors in oculoplastic surgery, which includes repair of the eye socket (orbit), eyelids, and tear production and drainage. Oculoplastic surgery may be performed to preserve sight as well as to enhance appearance.

Conditions that commonly require oculoplastic surgery in developing countries include:

* Drooping upper eyelid (ptosis)

* Scarring of the upper eyelid, caused by (trachoma, age or trauma, which prevents the lid from covering the entire eye

* Blocked tear ducts

* Trauma causing a fracture to the bones surrounding the eye (socket/orbit)

* Tumors within the orbit, eye or tear gland or pressing against the eye (orbital tumor)

Oculoplastic surgery includes placement of an artificial eye (prosthesis) when eye removal is necessary. Oculoplastic surgical skills are in extremely short supply in developing countries.

ORBIS FEH Comparison – DC-10 vs. MD-10

Recently, FedEx has donated an MD-10 cargo aircraft which will replace the DC-10 that has been serving them well (and still will during the transition). The MD-10 will be converted into the next generation, state of the art Flying Eye Hospital. With the MD-10, ORBIS will only need two pilots as opposed to the current three, as the need for a flight engineer is eliminated. Transitioning to the MD-10 also increases the availability of FedEx pilots to fly FEH programs. The MD-10 has better range, expending from 4,000 to 6,000 miles before a need to refuel. Finally, because they are converting a freighter to a hospital, they will be able to configure the hospital using modules as opposed to building it into the airframe – much more cost-effective and requiring less certification to operate as a flying hospital.

To learn more about ORBIS, including how to donate your time or resources to the cause, please visit www.ORBIS.org. And you can learn more about McDonnell Douglas commercial aircraft on the market at GlobalAir.com as well.

 

 

 

Multi-Agency Effort to Glean Facts on Asiana 777

Today at 2:30 EST, Debbie Hersman, Chairperson of the NTSB conducted an update of the Asiana 777 flight crash at San Francisco International Airport (SFO). The crash of the Boeing 777 resulted in two deaths 181 injured people. Forty-nine patients are at area hospitals after surviving the crash. Some of the important points that she made:

• The investigating parties along with the NTSB will be the FAA, Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, the Korean Aviation & Rail Association, and Asiana Airlines. Their focus will be on the operations of the aircraft, as well as human performance. The FBI has already provided GPS-based documentation and aerial photos to assist.

• All four pilots on board will be questioned; the Captain that was flying (training to receive his 777 rating), the Training Captain, and the relief Captain and First Officer (standard procedure for long international flights)

• There is no evidence of distress calls or problem reports prior to impact. The flight was vectored in to a 17 mile approach, cleared for both visual approach and landing.

• The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) is a mixture of both English and Korean. It’s important to note that, despite the reports from some news agencies, there was no call for permission for a go-around – it was mentioned on the CVR only.

• The crash site has lower portions of the aircraft in the sea wall, with a significant portion of the tail in the water, and debris is visible at low tide. Seawall debris has been found several yards up the runway as well.

• Despite initial reports of one the fatalities being caused by an emergency vehicle, the coroner has not rendered an official cause of death.

• The airspeed required for landing is 137 kts, and Flight Data Recorder shows that the aircraft had already dropped to 118 kts by 200 ft (about 16 seconds from impact). At 125 ft (8 seconds to impact), the throttles were moving forward. At 3 seconds to impact, the engines were back up to 50% power, with an airspeed of 103 kts. At impact, the airspeed has only climbed to 106 kts.

FBO of the Week – Metro Aviation Service (OLV)

One of the fastest growing areas in the United States is the East Memphis area of Tennessee; and at the forefront of that growth is Metro Aviation Service in Olive Branch, Mississippi. Pilots venture there for the quick turnaround and convenience offered for those either passing through, or travelling to see the FedEx St. Jude Classic in June.

Metro Aviation General Manager David Taylor is most proud of his FBO’s fuel prices, which he keeps more than competitive with the largest airports in the area. "We keep it reasonable and honest, and there’s no reason to look elsewhere!"

Think your FBO has what it takes to be featured? Give your GlobalAir.com representative a call today at 502-336-4909.

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