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Saudia Albayraq - Launch New FBO to FBO Business Jet Service

by Joe McDermott 29. February 2016 15:41
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Co-author & photographer Michael Kelly.


Will other operators team up with FBOs?
Is this a new FBO business model?

Saudia Private Aviation Jeddah FBO

A new exclusive scheduled domestic all business class service is to be launched in March by Saudi Arabian Airlines (Saudia) owned subsidiary Saudia Albayraq. Saudia Albayraq will fly between King Abdulaziz International Airport, Jeddah/OEJN and King Khaled International Airport, Riyadh/OERK and will use the privacy and convenience of the Saudia Private Aviation (SPA) Fixed Base Operator (FBO) VIP terminals at each airport. The SPA is an FBO (with 28 stations across the kingdom), aircraft management and private aircraft charter specialist and their FBO facilities offer world class private lounges and fast track security screening.

Saudia Albayraq will employ three Airbus 319-112 aircraft on the route in an all business class configuration of 48 seats aimed to rival even the comfort of private jet aircraft.

The new operator, using two of the aircraft will offer six daily scheduled flights between Riyadh and Jeddah each way, starting at 6am until 9 pm, providing a flight every 3 hours to each city. The third aircraft will be rotated into the schedule as the maintenance program requires. Every flight will have a corporate chef onboard to provide a unique dining experience.

The FBO involvement means the business or VIP passenger gets the full “corporate jet experience” while the onboard chef offers something very new for in-flight catering!

Fares are expected to be higher than business class on Saudia flights but come with the premium onboard service and the comfort, efficiency and privacy of the SPA VIP facilities and a dedicated Saudia Albayraq client support centre.

SPA Jeddah reception

Saudia Private Aviation was founded in Jeddah in 2009 by Saudia Arabian Airlines and became a separate entity in 2012. Future developments at SPA include a planned new MRO facility in the next five to seven years.

A real eye catcher at Saudia Private Aviations’ FBOs is their use of Porsche 911 Pininfarinas or other high performance cars for ramp transfers where required! At Jeddah, SPA has their own airside hotel at the FBO for engineering crews who may arrive with no visa to work on AOG aircraft. SPA handles all flights for the Saudi Arabian Royal Flight.

The company owns a fleet of ten aircraft, four Dassault 7X and six Hawker 400XP. SPA has an experienced OCC team of flight dispatchers located in Jeddah in support of client and their own operations.

Saudia Albayraqs’ format is an interesting evolution of existing services provided by British Airways (London City – New York with A319 aircraft), KLM (Amsterdam – Houston operated by PrivatAir, B738) & Lufthansa (Frankfurt – Dammam, also operated by PrivatAir, B738).

Scheduled FBO to FBO service

The real stand out differences offered by Saudia Albayraq being the use of an FBO facility at each airport and it is pushing its culinary limits, bringing in onboard chefs to create a high-flying in-flight dining experience. The in-flight chefs will create and plate meals to the standards of a fine-dining experience. With a chef on board, passengers will also enjoy greater flexibility in terms of their meal preference and service. All the in-flight chefs are fully qualified and have a minimum of five years of experience in noted restaurants and hotels from around the world.

And it is with PrivatAir Saudia the Saudia Albayraq have chosen to work closely with in launching the new service.

PrivatAir SA is a leading international business aviation group with headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and operating bases in Frankfurt (PrivatAir GmbH) Germany), Geneva (Switzerland) and Brazzaville (Congo). From its beginnings as the corporate aviation division of global conglomerate The Latsis Group, PrivatAir has matured today into an independent, world-renowned, full service commercial operator, with a track record of growth and safety spanning 36 years.

PrivatAir is a comprehensive aviation group with three divisions delivering service excellence both in the air and on the ground: Scheduled Services, Business Aviation (Aircraft Management, Aircraft Charter, Aircraft Sales, PrivatJetFuel / Fuel Management, Ground Services) and PrivatTraining.

The company’s wide range of clients includes royalty, heads of state, public officials, celebrities from the arts, sports and entertainment industries, captains of industry and private aircraft owners.

PrivatAir aims to take the best practices of the commercial airline industry and to add the flexibility of business aviation, as well as its exceptional standards of service.

The company has experience in operating the full range of business jet types from the Cessna Citation, Bombardier Learjets, Gulfstream and Dassault Falcon jets, to bizliners like the Airbus A319 and Boeings BBJ, BBJ2 , 757 and 767.

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Fixed Based Operators (FBO) | Flight Department | Flying | Airports | Joe McDermott | News

Get In on ADS-B Out!

by GlobalAir.com 26. February 2016 15:00
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By Conrad Theisen – Director of Avionics Sales
Elliott Aviation

ADS-B, or Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast, is an upcoming mandate put in place by the FAA to make the skies safer for everyone. Using GPS technology, which is far more reliable than radar, ADS-B will allow air traffic control to safely reduce separation minimums. By January 1, 2020, all aircraft will be required to transmit ADS-B to ground stations.

This mandate affects 30,000 turbine powered aircraft and 140,000 piston aircraft. Less than 10 percent of turbine aircraft have currently been modified, which is likely to lead to a highly congested rush the closer we get to the 2020 deadline. Make sure when you are looking to meet the ADS-B Out mandate that you consider taking advantage of ADS-B In.

For many airframes, there are either current solutions or solutions in work that will allow you to not only meet the mandate, but give you all of the benefits of ADS-B In. This will give you graphical traffic and weather through a Bluetooth connected mobile device.

We are currently working on standalone Garmin ADS-B solutions to include ADS-B In for Hawker, Premier and Beechjet 400A/Hawker 400XP. Remember, airframes and avionics can vary widely, so check with your service center to see what options are available for your aircraft.

Conrad Theisen has been with Elliott Aviation since 1996. He started his career as an Avionics Installer and was promoted to Avionics Manager in 2001. In 2009, he led the Customer Service and Project Management teams for all in-house aircraft. He joined the Avionics Sales team in 2012.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

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Aircraft instruments, IFR, IMC, safety | Aviation Safety | News

Globalair.com & Global FBO Consult Team Up

by GlobalAir.com 25. February 2016 09:47
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Louisville, Kentucky based aircraft sales and aviation services specialist Globalair.com and Irelands’ Global FBO Consult have teamed up to offer FBOs, ground handling services and airports unique information on marketing, media and public relations, competitor traffic analysis, strategic partnership negotiations, business intelligence and all other related topics via targeted articles to be written by Global FBO Consult and broadcast by Globalair.com.

Neosha Miller, Director of Sales for West Coast & International markets at Globalair.com stated “We are delighted to share Global FBO Consult’s fresh ideas and experiences with FBOs and airports as they have a real understanding of what difficulties and trends affect the industry”

Senior Consultant at Global FBO Consult, Joe McDermott added “We are very pleased to have this opportunity to offer our services via Globalair.com. By sharing the information in the articles the FBO & business airport industry will benefit the most, and I believe it will strengthen the profile of both our organizations”

With over 150,000 unique visitors each month and over 20 years of experience, GlobalAir.com continues to connect and support the aviation industry worldwide. From the Aircraft Exchange listing thousands of aircraft for sale or lease, the Airport Resource Center (ARC) that displays U.S. airport data and fuel prices on over 3200 FBOs, to the Aviation Directory’s thousands of aviation service companies and Aviation Events around the world, GlobalAir.com offers clients and online visitors one of the largest aviation resources in the world. Last year, GlobalAIr.com in an effort to support the future of aviation, launched the Calvin L. Carrithers Aviation Scholarship program to support selected student’s tuition funding when enrolling in an accredited University aviation program.

For more information regarding GlobalAir.com, visit www.globalair.com

Global FBO Consult is a consultancy service for FBOs, Ground Handlers & Business Airports

Global FBO Consult can provide you with cost effective solutions that will assist your company grow efficiently & deal with the competition head on, allowing you to attract new customers, keep existing customers & generate maximum revenue.

Staffed by a panel of experienced BizAv professionals who work in Business Development, Sales & Marketing, Ground Operations Training, Trip Support & Aviation Media, Global FBO Consult offers a unique, power-by-the-hour, one-stop-shop consultancy approach for any start-up or existing Fixed Based Operator, Ground Handler or airport looking to attract additional BizAv traffic.

 

It is not unusual for start-up FBOs to fail in less than 3 years or for established FBOs to find themselves next to a well funded start-up that drains their resources while forcing a price race to the bottom.

The Global FBO Consult team have experienced all forms of competition on the ramp & have over the years developed strategies to tackle head on the most aggressive opponents.

 

We have ongoing projects in: Europe, Eur-Asia, North Africa, North America, West Africa, & UAE

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That Frigid FICON NOTAM

by Sarina Houston 16. February 2016 08:56
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I don’t know about you, but we’ve had a few snow and ice storms this winter in our neck of the woods. As a flight instructor, bad weather offers the opportunity to teach students about runway condition and braking action, among other things, and it’s a good time to reinforce the importance of checking NOTAMs before heading to the airport.

During a recent winter storm, we were snowed in for three days. We were all getting antsy, wanting to get out of the house and fly. So after the clouds cleared, a student and I scheduled a flight for the first VFR day after the snowstorm. The weather looked fantastic - clear below 12,000, light winds and sunshine. Everything looked great… except for just this one thing:

!TTA 01/015 TTA RWY 03/21 FICON ICE BA POOR OBSERVED AT 1601241330. 1602241405-1602241900.

What does all that mean? In short, it means that there was still ice on the runway, and braking action was poor. This is a NOTAM(D) for runway condition, and yet another good reason to always check NOTAMs! While the weather outside was great VFR flying weather, we were still stuck on the ground. Here’s a breakdown of this NOTAM:



A NOTAM for field condition - what we call FICON - can be issued for any of the following runway conditions:

  • Snow
  • Ice
  • Snow and Ice
  • Slush
  • Water
  • Drifting or drifted snow
  • Plowed/Swept
  • Sanded/De-iced
  • Snow banks
  • Mud
  • Frost
  • Frost Heave
  • Cracks, Ruts, Soft Edges

Here are two more examples:

!MIV MIV RWY 10/28 FICON 1/4 IN LSR WEF 1112201200

NOTAM for Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), runway 10/28 is covered in ¼ inch loose snow, observed December 20, 2011 at 1200 UTC.

!ENA 5HO RWY 16/34 FICON THN PSR WEF 1109131520

NOTAM issued by Kenai for Hope Airport (5HO), thin layer of packed snow on runway 16/34, observed at 1520 UTC on September 13, 2011.

But what does that really mean? Can you - or should you - land under these conditions? For pilots, there are a few things to consider when taking off or landing on runways with any type of contamination. FICON NOTAMs will often include braking action reports, given as GOOD, FAIR, POOR or NIL, like in the example above. These values are often reported by pilots as they land.

Sometimes, braking action is reported as a MU value. MU is the mathematical term for the coefficient of friction, and its value is determined by a friction measuring device at airports. A value of 40 or above would mean braking action is good. A value of below 40 MU can mean a significant reduction in braking action.

Landing on any runway with less than GOOD braking action can be hazardous. It’s always best to avoid landing on runways covered in snow and ice. Even water can decrease braking action significantly. If you must land on an icy or snowy runway, use extreme caution, make a normal, stabilized approach use aerodynamic braking as much as possible before touching down. Try to keep the nose wheel straight during the landing rollout to prevent skidding. And remember that the taxiways are often in worse condition than the runways - even if the runway has been cleared, there’s a good chance the parking area hasn’t been.

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Aviation Safety | Flying | Sarina Houston

What You Should Know About the New Student Pilot Certificate

by Sarina Houston 2. February 2016 00:33
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New changes to FAA student pilot certificates are coming our way, and although there was an initial display of panic from some members of the flight training community, the new student pilot certificate rule might just be a good thing. Here’s what you need to know about the new rule, which begins April 1st, 2016:

The Details
First, don’t panic. Although students could have a delay in getting their student pilot certificates, it’s not all bad news. Here’s the scoop:

  • Students won’t have to go to the FSDO to get a student pilot certificate. FAA certified flight instructors, designated pilot examiners, Part 141 programs, and the FSDO will be all able to accept and submit applications for student pilot certificates. The student pilot applicant will have to show up in person and bring a photo ID to verify identity.
  • The new student pilot certificate will not expire, which brings it in line with the other certifications.
  • Instructors will no longer have to endorse both the student’s logbook and the student pilot certificate. Only one endorsement will be necessary from now on, which simplifies the process.
  • The student pilot applications will go through some kind of TSA approval process, which, whether we like it or not, should add a layer of security to flight training that we don’t currently have.
  • Student pilots who already have a paper student pilot certificate may continue to use it until it expires, or may choose to obtain a new plastic student pilot certificate from the FAA.

What could possibly go wrong?
Okay, so we know that it won’t be a perfect process, and as with any new process, there are sure to be frustrations involved. The biggest frustration that people foresee is that there will be a delay in the processing of student pilot applications. The FAA says it will process the applications as quickly as possible, but that it could take weeks or even months before the student receives the new plastic pilot certificate in the mail.

This delay in processing will potentially make it impossible for student pilots to solo right when they’re ready to. Some students, especially those in fast-paced flight training programs, will get to the potential solo flight in a matter of days or weeks, and will be left waiting on a student pilot certificate to arrive in the mail. This can be a source of frustration, to be sure.

Finally, should a student pilot applicant be denied a student pilot certificate based on information gleaned from the TSA check, the student will be faced with an appeals process that, as we all know, could take an extended amount of time. This, perhaps, will be the greatest source of frustration for those who may be “flagged” in the system for some reason, but who are otherwise eligible for a student pilot certificate. And perhaps, sadly, we’ll lose a few potential student pilots to yet another lengthy appeals process.

What do you think about the new student pilot application rules? A good thing or bad?

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Flying | Sarina Houston



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