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FBOs – Putting Ramp Skills to Good Use

by Joe McDermott 25. July 2016 15:43
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High quality FBO staff training can lead to a secondary purpose, especially if your ground staff is truly dedicated, enthusiastic and proud of the skills and experience they have developed.

There are a few volunteer groups of aircraft marshallers who, in their spare time, take these skills and put them to work in a variety of ways.

In the USA there is the Commemorative Air Force – Marshallers Detachment which supports Commemorative Air Force air shows and other events across the country. The Marshallers Detachment members are mainly drawn from former military personnel or in many cases family members have served in the military. The Lone Star Flight Museum, based in Galveston, Texas, has a similar group of dedicated marshallers. Indeed, the CAF Marshallers Detachment and Lone Star teams work closely together at some air shows, most notably at Wings over Houston, a CAF annual show held at Ellington Field, Houston. Incidentally, the Lone Star Museum is in the process of moving to Ellington Field to avoid a repeat of the devastation suffered during Hurricane Ike.

In the United Kingdom the North Weald Marshallers group are based at the former Royal Air Force station of the same name. They support several very large general aviation events each year, including the Light Aviation Associations annual get together at Sywell where they can have 1000+ movements over the four day event.

In Ireland we have Follow Me - Aircraft Marshallers (FM-AM), a small group (just ten members) of professional aircraft marshallers drawn from FBOs, retired FBO or airline staff (Landmark Aviation, Signature Flight Support, Universal Aviation, Weston Aviation, Aer Lingus) , who provide Aircraft Marshalling and Oversight of Airside Operations Areas for special aviation events, Fly-Ins, Air Shows and Open Days. More used as Ground Handling Agents to marshalling or towing Hawkers, Falcons, Gulfstreams, Boeing Business Jets and helicopters of every size, into tight spaces in all weather conditions, they have developed procedures and training to cover not only warbirds, but Class A light aircraft, micro lights and helicopter operations and are proficient at overseeing multiple ramps, e.g. Display Ramp, Visitors Ramp, Rotary Ramp, Refuelling Ramp, Disabled Pilots Ramp or Special Requirements Ramp.

It's Safety First Every Time! Follow Me-Aircraft Marshallers have been trained to international standards at their base FBOs, under the NATA Safety 1st - Professional Line Service Training (PLST) program operated by the National Air Transport Association or other approved safety training systems which are compliant with Irish Aviation Authority Ramp Training Regulations. Apart from aircraft marshalling PLST training covers aircraft ground servicing, fuel servicing, towing procedures, fuel farm management, fire safety, emergency procedures and aviation security with bi-annual recurrent training in place. A small number of members with no ramp training have been inducted since 2015 and they have been put through a mentored based training program. The first two trainees are expected to be signed off when the 2016 Winter Training and Recurrent Training Program is completed.

International Co-Operation: In 2011 Follow Me-Aircraft Marshallers received an invitation to join the CAF Marshallers Detachment at three of their events, TRARON (Training Squadron One) at Odessa Schlemeyer Field, CAF Air Show at Midland and Wings over Houston Air Show, all in Texas. Two senior members from the Irish group attended, underwent some integration training and were “patched”, signed off, the first non-USA marshallers to receive this honour!

Each year since, FM-AM have attended Wings Over Houston and worked the warbirds ramp alongside both CAF and Lone Star marshallers in what surely must be a unique trans Atlantic volunteer exchange of professional co-operation.

FM-AM has also been honoured by North Weald Marshallers with a number of invitations to cross the narrower Irish Sea to attend events in the UK.

I have no doubt there are other such volunteer groups across the globe and would be delighted to hear from them.

What’s in it for an FBO Manager or owner? Well, such coming together of like minded people can only result in the promotion of safety and professionalism within the FBO community. Ramp Ops staff who feel part of an extended professional group will bring a heightened sense of pride to their colleagues at your facility. So, if your staff show an interest in lending their free time and skills to support an aviation event in your region it could have a positive spin off benefit for your company.


Lone Star, CAF & FM-AM at Wings over Houston morning briefing.


FM-AM guide in B-29 Fifi.


Two FM-AM on the Tora, Tora, Tora Ramp


FM-AM team


North Weald crew


FM-AM were entrusted with Heli-Ops oversight for the Dalai Lama visit to Ireland


FM-AM Heli-Ops support

Hello, My Name is GA

by Lydia Wiff 15. July 2016 08:00
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Summer is in full swing and in east central Wisconsin, an otherwise quiet General Aviation (GA) airport becomes one of the busiest airports in the country in late July.  Oshkosh, a.k.a Wittman Regional Airport, becomes home to aviation enthusiasts and pilots alike.  Yes, you’ve probably guessed it’s because of Experimental Aviation Association (EAA) AirVenture Oshkosh.  Really, if I were to describe GA in one word, it would be: Oshkosh.

What Began As A Club…

AirVenture (the tradeshow and airshow) has its roots in EAA – an organization that was dedicated to supporting builders and restorers of experimental aircraft.  In 1953, this organization started out on the small side with just 150 people registered at the fly-in in September of that year.  While it originally started out as focused on experimental aircraft, EAA is now involved in almost every aspect of recreational aviation and aeronautics.

From 1953 and beyond, the show became too large for its original location in Milwaukee, WI and moved to Rockford, IL.  By 1970, again the airshow was too big and that’s when it made its final move to its present location in Oshkosh, WI.   It wasn’t always called EAA AirVenture, as for many years it was referred to as “The EAA Annual Convention and Fly-In”.   However, attendees have many different names for it such as The Oshkosh Airshow or simply just Oshkosh. 

Became The Busiest Airport For a Week…

What started as a fly-in has evolved into so much more than that.  EAA AirVenture is home to displays of every aircraft type imaginable from every era of aviation. 

While those aircraft on display are the main attraction, the air shows that happen every day draw people from around the state, the country, and the world.  In addition, Oshkosh also doubles as a trade show for not only aircraft manufacturers, but includes hangar builders, avionics engineering companies, and so much more. 

It also serves as a venue for learning as workshops are hosted by many organizations in the aviation industry such as EAA, Aircraft Owners and Pilot’s Association (AOPA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and much more.  EAA is also hosting forums, demonstrations, and interactive seminars in partnership with many well-known companies.  Companies such as Globalair.com will have their booths in various buildings around the airport for potential and current customers to visit (f.y.i., we’re going to be at Booth 3015 at Hangar C!) and do business with.

And Home to Memories for All Ages…

I get somewhat nostalgic when I think of AirVenture.  I’ve had the privilege of going a few times over the last several years.

The first time I attended, I was hosting a group of international young adults through the International Air Cadet Exchange (IACE) through the Civil Air Patrol (CAP).   I had the privilege of being their Public Affairs Officer and was fortunate enough to get the “backstage pass” to wander around and explore while taking pictures, of course.

The second time I attended, my sister and I ended up taking a bus with many others through the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) from the South Saint Paul Airport for the day.  I remember dragging myself and my sister to the airport before the crack of dawn to sit in a bus for several hours, explore AirVenture in one day as much as is possible with only six hours at my disposal.  Still, we made many memories together and she got to see why I’m so passsionate about aviation.

The third time I attended was nearly three years ago now with friends that I had known since my first job at a little flight school at Flying Cloud Airport.  They would attend the weekly safety seminars as a couple when they were dating, and we quickly became friends.  I eventually attended their wedding in the coming years and we ended up driving down together for the long weekend and camped next to their car in tents.  What fun!  I can’t tell you how amazing it is to wake up to the sound of airplanes, get ready for the day, and spend hours walking around seeing every facet of general and business aviation. 

Now, in just a few weeks, I’ll be returning to Oskhosh for the fourth time, this time I’m working at a booth!  Globalair.com is going to be located in Hanagar C, Booth 3015 and we’d love to have you come visit us! 

I’m looking forward to telling folks about our scholarship program as well as the company itself.  However, I’m there for some exciting and interesting stories to share with you all.  I think it’s going to be my favorite year yet!

So, What’s Your Story???

Got a favorite Oshkosh story? Have you flown to Oshkosh?  Did you meet your special someone there? 

Leave a comment below with your Oshkosh story – we want to hear from you!

Don’t forget to visit us at Oshkosh 2016 at Hangar C, Booth 3015! 

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What Are You Allowed To Do Inside Your Aircraft Hangar At An AIP Airport?

by Greg Reigel 6. July 2016 13:05
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What can you do inside of your aircraft hangar?  The lawyerly answer is “it depends.”  More specifically, it may depend in large part upon whether your hangar is on an airport that receives funds from the FAA through the Airport Improvement Program (“AIP”).  If your hangar is on an airport that does not receive AIP funds, then any restrictions or limitations on use of your hangar would likely be dictated within your lease with the airport owner or operator.

However, many airports receive AIP grant funds from the FAA for use in runway and taxiway construction/repair as well as various other airport improvement projects.  In exchange for its receipt of AIP grant funds, an airport sponsor agrees to certain grant assurances.  These grant assurances are contractual obligations that require the airport sponsor or owner to operate the airport in a certain way.

One of these AIP grant assurances requires the airport sponsor to make the airport property available for aviation or aeronautical uses.  Conversely, the airport sponsor also agrees that it will not allow airport property to be used for non-aeronautical uses unless it receives permission from the FAA.

One of the most common, and obvious, uses is aircraft hangar construction.  But, once an aircraft storage hangar is built on an AIP airport, how can the hangar be used?  If you were thinking “aircraft storage”, of course you are right.  But typically an aircraft doesn’t completely fill all of the space within a hangar.  So, what about storage of other items such as tools, equipment, automobiles, snowmobiles, etc.?  And can you build-out an office or personal living space inside the hangar?

In the past, the FAA has taken a very restrictive view regarding permitted hangar use.  However, the FAA recently issued a notice of final policy that clarifies what you can and cannot do within an aircraft storage hangar located on an AIP airport.

According to the FAA, permitted aeronautical uses for hangars include:

1.          Storage of active aircraft;

2.          Final assembly of aircraft under construction;

3.          Non-commercial construction of amateur-built or kit-built aircraft.  In expanding its policy to include all amateur/kit-built construction rather than just final assembly, the FAA recognized that “[i]t may be more difficult for those constructing amateur-built or kit-built aircraft to find alternative space for construction or a means to ultimately transport completed large aircraft components to the airport for final assembly, and ultimately for access to taxiways for operation”’

4.          Maintenance, repair, or refurbishment of aircraft, but not the indefinite storage of non-operational aircraft.  The FAA does not establish an arbitrary time period beyond which an aircraft is no longer considered operational. Rather, the FAA leaves it to the airport sponsor to decide whether a particular aircraft is likely to become operational in a reasonable time; and

5.          Storage of aircraft handling equipment (e.g. towbars, glider tow equipment, workbenches, and tools and materials used in the servicing, maintenance, repair or outfitting of aircraft).

Non-aeronautical use within a hangar that is used primarily for aeronautical purposes, may still be permitted provided that use does not interfere with the aeronautical use of the hangar.  What does that mean?  The FAA will consider certain uses to be interfering with the aeronautical use if they:

1.          Impede the movement of the aircraft in and out of the hangar or impede access to aircraft or other aeronautical contents of the hangar;

2.          Displace the aeronautical contents of the hangar.  The hangar owner may park a vehicle inside the hangar while he or she is using the aircraft and the FAA will not consider that to be displacing the aircraft;

3.          Impede access to aircraft or other aeronautical contents of the hangar; or

4.          Are stored in violation of the airport sponsor’s rules and regulations, lease provisions, building codes or local ordinances.

But what about that “pilot lounge” or “man/woman cave” within the hangar?  Is that a permitted use?  Unfortunately, the FAA’s policy does not provide a “bright line” answer.  According to the policy, the FAA “differentiates between a typical pilot resting facility or aircrew quarters versus a hangar residence or hangar home. The former are designed to be used for overnight and/or resting periods for aircrew, and not as a permanent or even temporary residence.”

Although the FAA then goes on to state that a hangar may not be used as a residence, it does not explain what that means.  As a result, in the absence of a clear definition, it is likely that this type of determination would be made on a case-by-case basis.  So, while some form of pilot lounge or office is likely permitted, at what point that area within the hangar becomes an unpermitted, non-aeronautical use will likely be decided based upon the facts of each case.

Keep in mind that the FAA’s policy on aeronautical use of hangars applies regardless of whether you lease the hangar from the airport sponsor or if you constructed the hangar at your own expense where you hold a ground lease with the airport sponsor for the hangar pad.  Once the airport sponsor receives AIP grants and airport land designated for aeronautical use is made available for construction of hangars, the hangars built on the land are subject to the airport sponsor's obligation to use the land for aeronautical purposes.

But at least now we have a little more guidance with respect to use of an aircraft hangar at an AIP airport.  Construction of an amateur-built or kit-built aircraft is allowed.  Residing in the hangar is not allowed.  Other uses may be allowed if they do not interfere with the aeronautical use.  And although some gray areas remain, the current policy does at least provide some additional clarification and guidance for aircraft hangar use.

 

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Greg Reigel

What does it cost, really?

by David Wyndham 5. July 2016 10:24
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I had a call from a customer who's flight department flies a popular mid-size business jet. He was looking at the variable cost we publish and comparing it with his own. After adjusting for fuel cost, his variable cost was almost double what we publish. He called me to try and figure out the cause of the diffrence.

My company specializes in understanding and explaining the costs associated with owning and operating an aircraft. One of our published databases calculates an average hourly operating cost. Many in our industry and in Government use these numbers as benchmarks or as should-cost figures. We do publish an explanation of terms defining the ground rules we use, and I've spent many a phone call like the one above  discussing and explaining what we did it that way, or how to adjust them for your situation. 

My call that day led to a fruitful discussion that identified the discrepancy in costs as the maintenance costs. After a couple questions, we figured it out. His aircraft has predominantly calendar based inspections. Much of the scheduled maintenance inspections were based on the number of days since last accomplished and not the hours flown. For our costs, we were showing about 380 flight hours per year. His utilization was about 130 to 175 hours per year - less than half of our assumption. A quick bit of math showed his maintenance cost average per flight hour were more than double what we published. He was also on a parts by the hour program that also had hourly billing minimums. Knowing how much he flew and the fact the jet's maintenance was calendar based  led us to understand that there can be significant variability is the cost to operate that aircraft.

When did you last ask the question, “How much does our aircraft cost to operate?” The answer will vary in relation to where you are between scheduled inspection and maintenance work. Sometimes significantly.

Required maintenance schedules vary, but a typical one might look like this:

- Routine airframe & engine checks every 500 hours or 12 months.

- More complicated airframe checks every 1,500 hours or three years. 

- Engine mid-life inspection every 2,500 hours. 

- Airframe heavy maintenance every eight years. Often, while undergoing heavy maintenance, the aircraft gets paint and interior refurbishment, maybe some new avionics and cabin upgrades. Costs can be $500,000 to $1.5 million depending on the “extras” added.

- Engine overhaul at 5,000 hours. Cost could be $500,000 per engine unless engines are on a guaranteed maintenance program.

- Aging aircraft inspections once the aircraft reached 12 years of age or older.

If you fly the above aircraft under 500 annual hours, much of your scheduled inspections will be determined by the calendar. Fly 500 or more annual hours and the hours flown drive the maintenance.  Where the aircraft is in age and hours will also impact its costs.  What if at age eight the aircraft just had a major maintenance inspection, avionics upgrades, and refurbished paint and interior adding to the cost of an additional $1.0 million? Due to the downtime to accomplish all that, the hours flown that year might have been only 250 hours. That cost for this one year will have just consequently ballooned to $2.25 million, or $9,000 per hour! If the CFO were doing a cursory review of your aviation costs with an eye to reduces expenses, you'd better be prepared to explain all this!

Answering To answer the question "How much does the aircraft cost" really depends on who you ask and when you ask. Give someone a very broad question and you will get a wide range of answers depending on the individual's perspective and timeframe.  You need to track these costs at a level of detail that leads to understanding. You need to be able to communicate these costs, in plain words, to the management or financial executive.

None of the answers are "wrong" or "right," only they are merely different. Knowing this, when you are talking about aviation costs with various professionals, you should keep in mind who you're talking with (and their unique perspective) so that you can understand their needs when they ask "What does the aircraft cost to operate?"


 

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David Wyndham | Flight Department | Maintenance

10 Comments Pilots are Tired of Hearing

by Tori Williams 2. July 2016 01:02
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Anyone who has been flying for any amount of time has been exposed to his or her fair share of public opinion. Whether it comes from genuine curiosity, ignorance, or just an urge to make conversation, people typically ask the same things over and over. I discussed the topic a few of my pilot friends and compiled a list of quotes that we are just tired of hearing.

1. “But you don’t actually FLY do you?”

This is the most common question I am asked when it comes up that I am in flight training. It is hard to answer this without sounding a little condescending. Yes, when you are training to become a professional pilot you actually get inside of an airplane and fly it around in the air. I am not sure what they think it means to be in flight training. I find this is a great opportunity to broaden their worldview and explain how the pathway to becoming a commercial pilot starts in much smaller airplanes than a jumbo-jet, which you have to fly several days a week.

2. “Will you fly me to Florida?”

This is typically the follow up question from the causal non-pilot acquaintance. Will you fly them somewhere really far away? This question can get awkward when the asker is serious and persistent. In most cases I explain how it will cost hundreds, if not thousands more to rent a small airplane and make the trip than to just fly on a commercial airline. Don’t be “that guy” to your pilot friends.

3. “You must be so rich!”

This assumption always rubs me the wrong way. It is no lie that aviation is an extremely expensive career or hobby, but I have worked hard to earn every flight hour I have accumulated. The majority of my flight training has been financed through scholarships awarded to me by the Ninety-Nines and I am so proud to be part of an organization that helps passionate students that are not able to afford flight training. Somehow people seem to forget they are talking about a sometimes-sensitive subject because they assume you are rolling in money. I can assure you that the majority of student pilots are not.

4. “So it’s not like you’re actually in college.”

I have gotten this response more than once when I tell someone I am in the flight program at my university. Yes, aviation students are in college. We have to take general education classes like everyone else. In a lot of ways our schedules are way more challenging than that of a regular college student, because a flight lab (which includes an average of 6 flight hours a week) only counts as 1 credit hour. Not to mention the time we spend preparing for flights and driving to and from the airport. Being in an aviation program is no walk in the park!

5. “I don’t trust [insert plane type] you won’t see me flying those.”

This was a major pet peeve of my friend who occasionally flies a Cirrus aircraft for flight instruction. He said that other pilots are terrified of the plane because of the horror stories they had heard about the parachute that they are equipped with malfunctioning. He said that they don't parachute into the airport every time, and they are really quite safe aircraft.

6. “You aren’t a real pilot until you fly tailwheel.”

This one gets thrown around a lot between nose gear and tailwheel pilots. Often coupled with, “a tricycle gear lands itself,” or “true stick and rudder skills come from tailwheel.” While I do appreciate the respect given to tailwheel pilots, I think it can sound unnecessarily degrading. All pilots are trained to be as good as they can be, and they should all be recognized for their unique skills, no matter the airplane they use.

7. “So do I really have to turn my cellphone off in an airplane?”

Nowadays I just give a simple “yes,” to this common question. It is one thing for me to have my cellphone with me on a training flight in perfect weather, it is another thing entirely for 150+ people to have their phones simultaneously transmitting while the pilot tries to land in extremely limited visibility. When your whole life depends on your instruments being accurate, there is no room for messing around. Just turn your phone off, you won’t have signal anyway!

8. “Who is the better pilot?”

My fiancé Daniel and I get asked this all of the time. We have a good laugh about it and say that it is the other one. Some pilots are very competitive and a question like this can spark some tension. In general it’s probably best to not compare two pilots with similar skills and qualifications, unless you are evaluating them for employment.

9. “I didn’t know women could fly!”

Despite huge advancements in the last several decades, aviation is still a male-dominated and sexist world. I became aware of this the first time that I went to take my private pilot written exam and the test administrator scoffed and said, “You don’t LOOK like a pilot.” People tend to picture either an old man or Tom Cruise when they imagine a pilot or aviator. I hope to see the normalization of the word aviatrix in the next few years. Women pilots are growing in numbers and there is no room for sexism in this industry.

10. “I could never do what you do. Flying is SO unsafe.”

The people that say these things typically have it in their mind that pilots are some daredevil risk takers that thrive off of the adrenaline of putting their lives on the line every day. Flying is not nearly as dangerous as the media makes it out to be, and I have always felt much safer while flying than I ever did while driving my car. I can only jokingly respond, “there’s a lot less things to hit when you’re flying!” so many times.

I hope that you enjoyed this article of 10 things pilots are tired of hearing. Do you agree that these are overused? Are there any phrases that drive you crazy? Let me know in the comments below!

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Tori Williams



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