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Top 5 Most Common Mistakes Among Pilot In Training

by GlobalAir.com 27. September 2016 15:06
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I want to first off begin this post by saying that I highly encourage everyone to go see the movie Sully now playing in theaters. In fact, this past weekend I went with the Sooner Aviation Club to see the movie at the Warren Movie Theater in Moore, Oklahoma. Here’s a group picture that we took right before we went and saw the movie.

Now onto more important things. With the semester in full swing and everyone trying to survive there first major exams and essay, I’ve also noticed that a lot of private pilots are taking a major step in their aviation career by soloing for the first time. I will never forget the first time I soloed back of October 13th 2015, and it’s a day that sticks with you for the rest of your life. As these students begin to work on the cross county portion of their private pilot’s license, I want to share my top 5 most common mistakes that students, and even myself, have made and continuously make.

#1- Forgetting the Checklist- By now I’m sure everyone has heard their flight instructor repeat this phrase multiple times “Are you forgetting to do something?” and 99% of the time they are referring to a checklist. Believe me I’ve heard this multiple times when it comes to flying and it’s definitely something that is easy to forget; however, it’s there for a reason and that is for the safety of yourself, your passengers, and the aircraft so if you are constantly forgetting a checklist this is a habit you need to break ASAP especially when it comes to a check ride.

#2- Landing too fast or to slow- When it comes to landing on final it’s all about your airspeed and making sure you are keeping it constant which means you absolutely need to be working the throttle constantly; however, never add too much power or pull it out when you are on final. This can lead to floating down the runway for a long time, or in the case of taking too much power out, you risk the chance of stalling the aircraft. In any case you feel like it’s going to be a bad landing it’s okay to call a go around, in fact it’s the best option. Remember you aren’t forced to land the aircraft on your first try if it looks like it’s going to be an unsafe landing.

#3- not flaring or over flaring- Along with the speed of the aircraft, a lot of people forget to flare the aircraft before hitting the runway which can lead to a hard landing, bouncing down the runway and even possible damage to the aircraft. Believe me if you don’t flare you could possibly damage the front of the aircraft or worse the propeller, so make sure you add that flare once you are over the runway to ensure not damaging the front. Equally as important is not to over flare since it could lead to a tail strike damaging the back of the aircraft and damaging the landing gear. The biggest thing I’ve noted when it comes to flaring is to just add small amounts of back pressure as I get closer to the ground preventing me from damaging the front or the back of the aircraft.

#4- wind corrections- So this is by far the biggest thing I always get harped on, not going to lie. Remember as pilot in command you are responsible for adding any wind correction because at any time a sudden burst of wind can hit your aircraft and possibly cause for you to flip over. It’s also important you add wind correction during takeoff and landing for the exact same reason, you don’t want to end up upside down like this aircraft.

#5- Situational Awareness- When it comes to flying it’s very easy to get fixated on your instrument especially during a maneuver. For example, when I use to do steep turns I would always focus on my turn coordinator to make sure I rolled on the proper heading. Next thing I knew the nose of the airplane was facing down and I was losing 500ft per minute and it took me a while to break that habit. While your instruments are a great resource, guess what? Your eyes are a better resource and you should always be aware of what’s going on around you. For all you know there could be another aircraft in your area, you could have a bird strike, or in my case you could be losing altitude so always be looking out outside to make sure you are aware of your surroundings.

 

By Cameron Morgan

Where Are They Now?

by Lydia Wiff 15. September 2016 08:00
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Ever wondered what happens to students after they graduate?  Ever notice how their news on lives suddenly tapers off in our modern-day world where social media this time of year used to be filled with this class and that class, hockey games, football games, etc.?  Well, this summer I had the chance to catch up with a recent University of North Dakota (UND) graduate, Tony Batson, at the 2016 AirVenture in Oshkosh and learn about how he started at UND and what he’s up to these days.  

That Chicago Kid…

Tony grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, IL and not surprisingly, had exposure to aviation from a young age.  His father was a big part of his interest in aviation as he was told stories about aviation in World War II as a young kid.  Tony was also into model aircraft building as well as Remote Controlled Aircraft (RCA).  His interest for aviation piqued in high school when he had his first Discovery Flight at Chicagoland Aviation and soon he was working for the company as an aircraft detailer and in their office at the Lewis University Airport (KLOT).

Tony began his search for an aviation university in high school and looked at schools such as Purdue University, and others.  One of his managers was actually a UND alumni which greatly factored in his decision as he heard of how professors at UND would go above and beyond for their students. On a “freezing, cold October day”, Tony made the trip to the upper Midwest and the rest was history.

Being at UND…

Like most students, Tony’s first year was a bit of a culture shock – especially coming to the Midwest after living in the suburbs of a major U.S. city.  His roommate, a local to Grand Forks, took him under his wing.  Tony remembers when they first met his roommate offering his cars and spare keys for whenever he needed to use it.

Flying didn’t always come naturally for Tony and sometimes lessons were challenging, but Tony “hit the ground running”.   He wasn’t just involved in flying – he was also involved in different student groups on campus.

There were many groups that focused on aviation at UND, but Tony remembers Alpha Eta Roe as the “one club I really stuck with”.   As soon as he joined, he had a position – he worked his way through different leadership positions and ended up as the President of the aviation fraternity.  He remembers it as a way to network with leaders of other student groups on campus and what a benefit it was.

After UND…

College wasn’t always about Alpha Eta Ro as he remembers advisers and professors alike as being a positive influence on his time at UND.  However, the fraternity proved to be more than just a spare time activity as his work with the president of Piper Aircraft on a recent visit to UND landed him a job as a graduate intern in the Marketing Department.

He enjoys working with Piper Aircraft as it is something new every day.  Some days he could be working on developing checklists, or he’s working with Sales and matching sales leads with regional dealers or making that first contact.  Recently, he’s been working on marketing the new fleet of Piper aircraft being built to replace the aircraft at UND (and doing a great job, by the way).

Some Words for Students…

I often wonder what graduates would say to students at UND, almost at UND, or fellow graduates.  Tony advises prospective students to get involved and get to know people while his advice to current students is to work hard because it’s a great time for pilots right now.  Grads have some special advice that he tries to embody on a day-today basis:  pay it forward and help the people behind you.

Where Are They Going?

After catching up with Tony, I couldn’t help but be excited about his aviation journey which is just beginning.  I also ruminated on how his current job and experiences were because of UND and the groups he was involved in while a student there – UND is truly a great place to be.

Are you a UND alumni?  Feel free to comment with your memories as a student there or any other school you attended!

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GlobalAir.com | Lydia Wiff | Piper | UND

The Speedtwin and Upset Prevention & Recovery Training (UPRT)

by Joe McDermott 8. September 2016 16:58
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No matter which sector of the aviation industry you work or play in, you will know the feeling upon seeing an aircraft type you just cannot put a name too. Well, I grew up assembling plastic Airfix kits, studying each new addition of The Observers Aircraft Guide, reading every new issue of Air Pictorial, Aviation News and countless other magazines to keep up with the latest developments. As I got a bit older regular visits to the big aviation show cases at Farnborough (UK) and Paris (France) helped keep me up to date with developments across the industry.

Nowadays it’s easier, it’s all on the internet, just Google or Wikipedia it or search YouTube. Except it isn’t, not always.

I was recently invited to oversee ramp operations at an air show support airfield. On looking at the list of acts I noted something new to me, a Speedtwin. Just what the hell is a Speedtwin? This led to much head scratching!

Further investigation via the web turned up a very limited amount on Wikipedia, and nothing on YouTube.

At the show I meet the demonstrator pilot and Managing Director of Speedtwin Developments Ltd., Malcom Ducker and fired off a barrage of questions about this unusual twin to which he gladly responded in detail.

The Speedtwin is a British designed and built light, twin-engine, 2 seat, tandem configuration aircraft that has superior performance, strength and flexibility when compared to other similar aircraft. Its superior maneuverability and twin-engine layout make it uniquely suitable for the soon to be introduced EASA and FAA requirement for all airline pilots to undergo Upset Prevention and Recovery Training (UPRT), as loss of control in-flight has become the No.1 single cause of air transport accidents.

The Speedtwin is the only fully aerobatic, civil, multi-engine aircraft around and is stressed to +6G and -3G, meaning it is tough and highly manuverable aircraft making it ideal for the UPRT role.

The Speedtwin’s short, rough field performance, twin engine configuration and economy make it highly suited for many other roles including maritime surveillance, border patrol and protection of remote industrial sites such as oil and gas installations.

It is specifically designed to operate from short, grass or desert strips hence the tail-wheel configuration, giving the operator great flexibility as it can be based anywhere there is 100 metres of dirt!

Visibility from the cockpit is superb and is an outstanding feature of this aeroplane. It is probably the best performing and safest aircraft in its class.

The example I examined is a prototype, made of aluminium with 2 x 205 hp engines and fixed pitch propellers, which is a bit like driving a car stuck in 3rd gear. Even so it has a good single engine performance, which means it is suitable for any over-water or other hostile terrain flying duties such as maritime surveillance, fisheries protection and other coastguard type duties. The production version will have constant speed props, which will enhance the aircraft’s performance significantly. It will be able to loiter on one engine while in the search area giving an endurance of more than 8 hours. The 400 litre fuel tanks give the aircraft a range of over 1000 miles or 1700km.

The aircraft has received UK CAA Permit certification and continues to be used for development and demonstration flying. Further investment is now required in order to achieve full EASA certification, which once received will enable the Speedtwin aircraft to enter commercial production.

Due to the relatively low cost of manufacture, (it is of all aluminum construction), the Speedtwin aircraft can be both competitively priced and highly profitable. It is estimated that the aeroplane can be manufactured for US$240,000, and sold for US$480,000.

Interest in putting the Speedtwin into serial production is mostly coming from China and the Middle East.

Malcolm Ducker flew Hawker Hunters in the Royal Air Force and was a training captain with Cathay Pacific Airways, flying Lockheed Tristars and Boeing 747-400s before seeking new challenges in aviation by taking on Speedtwin Developments Ltd

Malcolm says that the Speedtwin is a delight to fly and he enjoys flying it even more than the big Boeing and even the supersonic Hunter! No surprise for me there, as I walked up to him following one spirited demo flight I could not help but notice that he was grinning from ear to ear like a Cheshire cat!

The manoeuvres Malcolm make during his display included ½ Cubans, loops, barrel rolls, aileron rolls, Derry turns, wingovers and steep turns.

Photographs: courtesy of Frank Grealish, WorldAirPics.com

When to replace an aircraft is more than just simple math

by David Wyndham 2. September 2016 11:22
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Our company co-founder, Bill de Decker, and I recently finished a major aircraft review for a government entity. They had several missions and several types of aircraft that were necessary for the mission. We looked at the missions and their current aircraft. We identified shortfalls in capability and desired utilization. We looked at the current costs, the reliability, and projected out future costs. We identified future mission changes as best we could. We did look at whether it was cost effective for the government or a contractor to own and or operate the aircraft. At the end was a series of business cases for each aircraft and an overall acquisition plan for their aviation operation. None of the missions were simple passenger-carrying missions and, given their requirement to look out 20 years, a lot of long term assumptions had to be inferred. What they now have is a plan with dates and actions that are needed, along with mission and financial justification. All this work was fun and the folks we worked with were a joy. It all came down to this:

There are two major reasons to replace your current aircraft. One reason is the mission has changed and the current aircraft is no longer capable of effectively supporting that mission. The second reason is the economics of owning and operating the aircraft render it too costly as compared to the alternatives. Both can combine to demonstrate and support the value of a business aircraft. 

Both reasons are simple but involve a lot of complexities. 

With respect to missions of a business aircraft, changes tend to fall into sub sets

1. Passenger loads change requiring a different aircraft. If you need nine seats, six won't do. Or perhaps decreasing passenger loads make the idea of a smaller aircraft appealing.

2. Trips change requiring either longer range aircraft or aircraft with different capabilities such as operations from shorter runways or flights into and out of high altitude airports.

3. Utilization also factors into the equation. Either the need for more hours or simultaneous aircraft can drive the decision to add additional aircraft.

Upsizing in capability tends to have an upsizing in budget. What needs to be considered is the added value the aircraft change will bring. Will more passengers enable greater benefits to the company? Does avoiding that fuel stop, and the time avoided, add enough value to make the acquisition and operational costs of the larger aircraft worthwhile? 

I did one analysis that showed Jet B with greater range than the current Jet A. To meet the non-stop range Jet B had to fly at long range cruise. Allowing an hour for a fuel stop, Jet A can fly the two legs at high speed cruise and still arrive within 20 minutes of Jet B. We looked for another option as the value of replacing Jet A with Jet B didn't deliver enough value. 

When looking at costs, make sure to look at all the costs: acquisition, operating costs, fixed costs, taxes, and depreciation (tax and market). Balance that against the mission for a "best value." 

Age is a factor, too. As aircraft age, their maintenance requirements, and costs tend to increase. With that comes decreased availability as the aircraft spend more days in maintenance. What makes this difficult to analyze is the cyclical nature of maintenance can hide this long term increase. 

Many operators when they do a major event like an engine overhaul or heavy airframe maintenance do paint, interior and even avionics upgrades. The costs are significant and not seen again for many years. One decision point here is whether to sell the aircraft a few years before those costs occur, or incur those costs and operate the aircraft for a few more years. This is because most buyers prefer not to have significant costs for the first few years when the acquire a pre-owned aircraft. But if you do the overhaul, etc. the market is not likely to award you with 100% of the cost in an increased value. See, not so easy to decide?

Having a plan in place makes the process easier. Then every year, review the plan, and when appropriate, update it. When to replace is not a simple equation, and it can involve qualitative and quantitative measures. Be proactive and work with the owners/stakeholders in the aircraft to be ready with the justification well in advance of any issues arising. 

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Aircraft Sales | David Wyndham

Beginners’ Guide to Public-Use Airport Classification

by Tori Williams 1. September 2016 20:00
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One of the best college courses I have ever taken is Airport Management. It is truly fascinating to learn about the breakdown of just how exactly airports are classified, owned, funded, and managed. Pilots would not fly without airports, and airports would not be necessary without pilots, so I believe that any good pilot should have a working knowledge of the different types of airports and how they are categorized.

I could make a whole series of articles just based on who owns what type of airport, the types of regulations they have to follow, and the different ways airports are managed. However, today I would simply like to introduce the rules behind how airports are generally classified in the US.

The FAA has been recognizing public-use airports that are eligible for federal funding since 1970. They created the National Airport Systems Plan (NASP) which included approximately 3,200 such airports that were shown to be serving public needs. In 1982, with the passage of the Airport and Airway Act, the FAA was asked to prepare a new version of the NASP, to be called the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS). This updated version included a total of 3,411 airports in 2008.

With the new NPIAS system came a new way of classifying airports for federal funding. Here are the basic parts and a quick definition for each.

1. Primary Airports

These are categorized in the NPIAS as those public-use airports enplaning at least 10,000 passengers annually. This accounts for less than 3 percent of the nation’s total airports, with only 383 airports falling into this category in 2008.

2. Commercial Service Airports

This is any airport that accommodates scheduled air carrier service by a certified airline. Of the 770 million passengers that flew domestically or internationally in the United States in 2009, practically all of them went by way of a commercial service airport. The FAA recognized 522 of these such airports in 2008.

3. General Aviation Airports

Airports with fewer than 2,500 annual enplaned passengers are covered by this classification, as well as airports that are used exclusively by private business aircraft not providing commercial passenger air carrier service. This category gets a little more tricky, as there are over 13,000 airports that technically fit the description. However, not all of these are included in the NPIAS. There is usually at least one GA airport in the NPIAS per county, and any airport with more than 10 aircraft based there and more than 20 miles away from the next nearest NPIAS is also included. In 2008, a total of 2,564 airports held this classification in the NPIAS.

4. Reliever Airports

Perhaps the most unique of the classifications, relieved airports are specifically designated as “general aviation airports that provide relief to congested major airports.” In order to qualify as a reliever airport, the airport must have at least 100 airplanes based at the field or handle 25,000 itinerate operations.

Primary Airports also have a special subsection to include the different sizes of primary airport operations. It is important to note that the NPIAS definition of a hub is different than that in the airline industry, and they are simply referring to the number of annual enplaned passengers that use the airport. These are as follows:

1. Large hubs

These airports account for at least 1 percent of the total annual passenger enplanements. Of the 30 large hub airports that were classified in 2008, they handled 70 percent of all passenger enplanements in the US.

2. Medium hubs

These airports handle between .25 and 1 percent of the annual enplanements. There were 37 airports that held this designation in 2008.

3. Small hubs

These airports handle between 0.05 and 0.25 percent of annual passenger enplanements. The NPIAS reported 72 of these in 2008.

4. Nonhubs

These airports handle more than 10,000 annual enplanements, but less than 0.05 of the annual total enplanements.

I hope that I have helped to break down a little more just how airports are classified by the FAA. I would recommend looking up your favorite airports to see what type of hub they fall under, and if they are considered primary or just commercial service.

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Airlines | Tori Williams



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