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First in Africa - FBO Ramp Training, Small Investment, Large Results

by Joe McDermott 31. January 2017 09:34
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The news in last August that EAN Aviation, the Lagos based business aviation services company had become the first Safety 1st Qualified African location to be listed on the US National Air Transportation Association’s (NATA), Global FBO Map, has been greeted as a positive achievement across the industry and shows that such programs are not just for the multi station FBO chains. This is something all FBOs can achieve, be they in Canada’s Far North, Hollywood’s Van Nuys, squeezed between the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean at Tierra del Fuego, Russia’s Vladivostok or in Kilimanjaro, the gateway to Africa’s wildlife heritage, any location where people mix on a ramp with general/business aviation!

The story of how this came to pass is one many FBOs, ground handlers and others operating on the ramp (AOCs, AMOs, MROs etc.) will find of interest and may even inspire them to take the step forward that will allow them attain an international standard they may not have, no matter what size their operation is.

I had just started a consultancy contract with EAN at their FBO in Lagos, the very first Nigerian FBO in fact! The company had two out stations, Abuja and Port Harcourt, but Lagos was the jewel in the crown. My function there was as wide as it was varied; I covered strategic partnership planning and negotiation, business development, sales and marketing as well as oversight of the FBO operations, the AMO and MRO.

CEO Segun Demuren was very keen on bringing EAN up to the best possible international standard, in all departments, but safety and customer service really were his overriding concerns. Mr. Demuren is the son of one of the most respected Director Generals of the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) ever, Dr. Harold Demuren, an aeronautical engineer at heart, he holds a Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineering, is a man often credited by international bodies as having dragged Nigerian aviation safety standards up by their boot straps during his tenure (2005 – 2013)! So, it is no surprise that Segun Demuren was hot wired to move safety and customer service up a level when the opportunity presented itself.

Before starting my own business airport/FBO consultancy focused firm I had worked with Landmark Aviation and later with Universal Aviation. Both had a very strong safety and customer service ethos. At Landmark I was introduced to the online based Safety 1st Professional Line Service Training (PLST) with bi-annual recurrent training. Moving to Universal Aviation I was impressed to find that PLST was also required for all ramp and customer care staff.

EANs CEO was far from convinced that his team were being trained to the best possible standard. Early one morning I popped over to his office and gave him an impromptu briefing on Safety 1st PLST, what benefits it would bring to the company and our clients, how it could be implemented and how much it would cost. Less than twenty minutes later I walked out of his office as project manager.

Signing up for the program took just a few minutes. Next, each Ramp Ops, Dispatch and CRO shift was briefed on all aspect of PLST, with emphases on generating enthusiasm and a team spirit for the project.

Working with Quality Manager Josh Amara we got everyone off to a great start. Within days the Head of HR said with a smile “it’s great to see staff, heads down, quietly & enthusiastically working through the program as a team”. Even more pleasing was the fact that once away from the computers, they could be spotted in small groups discussing how best to work with new skills learned, procedures and insight.

We provided a couple of additional work stations in quiet areas where students not used to online training could concentrate and take notes as they worked through each theory module. Working with their supervisors, who were also taking the training, time was allocated throughout each shift so the crew could get uninterrupted sessions at the computers, but ground ops too would be unaffected.

Their enthusiasm was infectious. So much so that two engineers from the MRO/AMO offered to take small groups to the hangar for familiarization sessions on aspects of aircraft systems; flight controls, undercarriage, engines, avionics and fuel. This lead to one of our based Citation XLS captains giving sessions in the cockpit, where he happily took time to explain everything from theory of flight, weight and balance to fuel calculations. You might think all of this is going beyond what is necessary, but consider this, most of our operations crew had never been inside an aircraft before, let alone flown in one. We were in new territory and given a one off chance to build a new team, feed their enthusiasm and create a working environment where what they learned with the online training program would be carried with pride onto the ramp, into the hangar and throughout the entire customer service area.

Just three weeks after starting the program, I received a call from the Head of Ground Operations for very well known Europe based AOC operator who had a number of Challengers and a Global Express based with us. Their chief pilot had just returned from a flight to our facility and had made a point of reporting that a very noticeably upgrade in service quality had been noted both on the ramp and in our VIP facility. This was an early endorsement of the decision to invest in PLST and our people.

At this stage too I could clearly see a new and vibrant safety culture spread through our entire facility during towing, refuelling, marshalling and general servicing (potable water, toilet, baggage loading ect).

With the online modules complete it was time to undertake the practical tests. It was then that we saw how the online training, supported by mentoring from professionals in the industry, engineers and pilots, really came together. Gone were old unsafe habits. Now we could see a complete team take safety and pride in each and every task put before them. Everyone was taking time to think about what they had to do, checking out options, noting how other ramp users would be impacted by their decisions, consulting with team members.

In just under three months we had all the students complete the course and all passed.

First FBO in Africa to be NATA Safety 1st PLST accredited! All done for a modest financial investment and without disrupting daily operations.

Following my return to Europe, Tayo Aiyetan, Head of FBO Operations, took oversight of the program and oversaw the recurrent training after two years, moved the project onto the next stage, fulfilling the NATA requirements to put EAN on the Global FBO Map. EAN is now working towards IS-BAH status and CEO Demuren sees this as the company’s next progressive step forward. More importantly, the CEO is giving it his full backing, as always!

A Brief Word about PLST Modules
Safety 1st PLST offers a range of modules, covering Ground Servicing, Safety, Customer Relations, Marshalling, Fire Safety, Airport Security, Towing and Refuelling. I believe there is great value in offering staff as many modules as possible, even if they are not directly applicable to their role. For example, there is no harm in training your customer relations staff in the dangers of FOD, refuelling or towing. The more exposure everyone gets to all that impacts safety and customer service delivery the greater both is enhanced, the more your team integrate with other departments, the more the team as a whole operates in a safe and efficient manner.

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Fixed Based Operators (FBO) | Joe McDermott

Documenting Maintenance and Inspection Records

by Greg Reigel 30. January 2017 09:38
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The primary job of an aircraft mechanic is to service and repair aircraft and their components/systems. And once he or she has completed an inspection or item of maintenance, 14 C.F.R. §§ 43.9(a)(maintenance) and 43.11(a)(inspections) require the mechanic to “make an entry in the maintenance record of that equipment.” Typically, this means writing the information in the aircraft’s maintenance records (e.g. the aircraft’s log books).

But what happens if the aircraft owner or operator does not provide the mechanic with the aircraft’s log books? Sometimes the log books are not with the aircraft or the owner or operator simply forgot to bring them with the aircraft. In other cases, the aircraft owner or operator refuses to bring the aircraft’s log books to the mechanic, preferring to maintain possession of the aircraft’s log books. Can the mechanic require the aircraft owner or operator to deliver the aircraft’s log books before the mechanic will sign off on an inspection or maintenance?

The regulations do not require that the mechanic have physical custody of the aircraft’s log books or maintenance records. While the mechanic may make delivery of the aircraft’s log books a condition for performing the applicable inspection or maintenance, the implications of that business practice are beyond the scope of this article. So, if the mechanic does not have the aircraft’s log books, how is he or she supposed to make the required entry?

Well, according to a recent Legal Interpretation issued by the FAA’s Office of the Chief Counsel, the mechanic does not need to have the aircraft’s log books in order to make the required entry. Rather, a mechanic may simply make the required maintenance entry, even including an approval for return to service, on a piece of paper and provide it to the aircraft owner or operator for inclusion in the aircraft’s log books or maintenance records.

Remember, under 14 C.F.R. § 91.417 an aircraft owner, not the mechanic, is required to keep the aircraft’s maintenance record to document that required inspections and maintenance have been accomplished. However, since making an entry in an aircraft’s log books exposes a mechanic to the potential for both regulatory and civil liability, it is also a good practice for the mechanic to keep copies of all of the entries he or she has made in the maintenance records for customers’ aircraft.

And whether an entry is made in the aircraft's log books or simply written on a piece of paper and delivered to the aircraft owners or operators, it is also important for the mechanic to exercise the same care with what he or she writes, or does not write, in connection with aircraft service and repair as the mechanic does in actually performing the work. After all, by making that entry the mechanic will be responsible for that inspection or maintenance.

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Fixed Based Operators (FBO) | Greg Reigel | Maintenance

The Top 10 Business Jets

by Lydia Wiff 15. January 2017 08:00
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It’s hard to believe that just over 100 years ago, flying was just a pipe dream.  We’ve come a long way and now aviation has a part to play in many industries and has become its own segment of the aerospace industry.  “Business aviation” refers to any aircraft that are used in furtherance of a business.  According to the National Business Aviation Association, business aviation contributes approximately $150 billion to economic output and employs at least 1.2 million people (NBAA.org).  While only about 3% of the 15,000 registered business aircraft are flown by Fortune 500 companies, the rest belong to varying sizes of for-profit and not-for-profit companies all over the United States – this includes universities, local and federal government, and other businesses. 

Arguably, the future of aviation is business aviation and Globalair.com has their top ten picks for business aircraft backed up by several years of experience in aircraft sales. 

#10: Gulfstream 550 (G550)

If there is one company that evokes luxury in their aircraft, Gulfstream Aerospace has to be it.  The sleek frame of the G550 cuts through the air at 0.80 Mach using two Rolls-Royce BR710 engines with a max cruising altitude at 51,000 feet.  This luxury jet can be configured up to 19 passengers and sleeps 8 comfortably.  If you’re looking to escape the cares of everyday life easily, or reach your international group in England, the G550 has a range of almost 7,000 nautical miles (nm).

While it boasts a comfortable ride for passengers (a cabin over 40 feet long), pilots aren’t soon forgotten with the state of the art PlaneView™ flight deck featuring some of the most advanced avionics known in existence.  The flight deck features four liquid crystal displays for your flight crew with easy software upgrades making it compatible to your flight department, no matter how big or small.  Additionally, a Head-Up Display (HUD) is included in the G550 that projects flight data in the pilot’s forward-looking field of vision.  In times of reduced or obscured vision, such as inclement weather, the Enhanced Vision System (EVS) uses infrared technology to capture what the pilot cannot see – runway markings, taxiways, and other terrain are now visible in poor weather conditions.

According to the NBAA, the G550 has the reliability of 99.9% -- this means out of five years of service, you will only miss one trip (Gulfstream.com).  In a world where time equals money, this is a statistic to get behind.

#9: Gulfstream 200 (G200)

The little brother to the G550, the G200 had its first flight on Christmas Day in 1997 and was later released in 1999.  While Gulfstream no longer produces the G200, it doesn’t keep it from being a popular used aircraft.  It was originally named the “Astra Galaxy”.

Like most Gulfstream aircraft, the G200 boasts a large cabin size that can hold to 18 passengers, but typically configured for 8-10 passengers.  Unlike the Rolls-Royce engines, the G200 runs on two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306A turbofans producing a maximum cruise spend at 0.80 Mach, similar to the G550.  While it has approximately the same cruising speed, the G200 has almost half the range at 3,400 nm at 45,000 feet which makes it a perfect aircraft for domestic flights here in the U.S.

From this description, the G200 can be seen not only as a predecessor to the G550, but the smaller, less expensive version of the G550.  The G200 is an excellent aircraft for a business that does mostly domestic flights.

#8: Hawker 4000

Taking a break from the Gulfstream family, the Hawker 4000 hails from Beechcraft which is owned by Textron Aviation – the parent company to Cessna and others.  Produced from 2011 to 2013, the Hawker 4000 was quickly realized as the top jet product by Beechcraft.

A worthy competitor to the G200 as well as slightly newer, it can seat up to ten people (14 maximum) and has average of 6 feet of standing room in the interior cabin.  It cruises at 45,000 feet with a range of 3,445 nm and 870 km/hr.  A common identifier of the Hawker 4000 is the hawk profile painted in tan on the tail section.

If you’re currently in the G200 as an airframe, a newer and comparable version would be the Hawker 4000.

#7: Hawker 800XPi

A predecessor to the Hawker 400 is the Hawker 800 which was first produced in the early 1980s.  A later version of the Hawker 800 was the XP and XPi which was most notable by the addition of winglets.

Like the previously mentioned aircraft, the 800XPi is similar in size when it comes to passenger capacity and length.  The maximum speed in cruise is 745 km/hr while its range is the shortest out of the group at just under 2,000 nm and has a service ceiling at 41,000 feet.  However, it’s rate of climb is nothing to sneeze at – 1,948.8 feet/minute!

#6: Citation Sovereign

We now switch gears back to the Textron company to that of Cessna and the Citation Sovereign.  This particular aircraft is classified as a mid-size business jet and at the time of its introduction in 2004, the third largest in the Citation line (weight-wise).

A unique feature of the Sovereign is its ability to take off and land in short distances which is unusual in a business jet.  For corporations and private companies, this becomes a valuable feature for plants and factories situated in small towns with short runways.  Not only does the Sovereign get you there fast (848 km/hour), but it also is considered a transcontinental aircraft with a range of over 3,000 nm.

#5: Falcon 2000

In our plethora of business aircraft manufacturers, we come to Falcon (birds of prey do make good names).  Dassault Aviation is a French aircraft manufacturer that can be seen as a fairly healthy competitor to Textron’s companies as well as Gulfstream.  Probably the most notable of the Falcon line are the aircraft that have three engines, however, the 2000 is the one of the older models in the line with just two engines.

Like other aircraft in its class, the 2000 has comparable speed as well as range which is 3,000 nm.  The impressive thing about the 2000 is its ability to climb to 37,000 feet in just nineteen minutes – that’s just over 1,900 feet/minute!

#4: Challenger 605

We’ve finally come to our last brand name in jets (although not our last pick) which is that of Challenger.  It’s one of the few non-American manufactures and actually is produced by Canadair which you might recognize as the manufacturer of the Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ).  Coincidentally, Canadair is an independent company that is also a division of Bombardier Aerospace – famous for its Bombardier Business Jets, or BBJs, among others.

The Challenger 605 is the fourth aircraft in the 600 series which dates back to the late 1970s.  The 605 was introduced in 2006 as an upgrade to the 604.  Some new features included larger cabin windows, updated Rockwell Collins instrumentation and the capability of holding an “electronic flight bag”.   The most distinct visual feature is the rounded tailcone.

The 605 is comparable in size to the previously discussed aircraft, but is one of the fastest at 870 km/hour and a range close to 4,000 nm.

#3: Challenger 300

The Challenger 300, at first glance, can easily be confused with the Challenger 600 series which is not the case.  Unlike the 600 series, the 300 is recognized as a Bombardier (parent company of Canadair). 

It entered commercial service in early 2004 and is considered a super-mid-size jet.  This basically means it’s very comparable to all the other aircraft discussed, but has greater range capability.   The 300 has a range of approximately 5,700 km and caps out at 45,000 feet.  

#2: Gulfstream IV-SP (GIV-SP)

We’re back in the Gulfstream family (popular for a very good reason)! The GIV-SP is very comparable to other Gulfstream products, but represents the fine-tuning that the Savannah-based company did to improve their product line.

For instance, Honeywell advanced flight deck displays, electrical power generation, cabin temperature control and pressurization were added to this particular model.  Additionally, improved Automatic Power Unit (APU), flap system, redesigned landing gears, and other systems were improved in this particular model.

#1: Gulfstream 650 (G650)

Quite possibly my favorite Gulfstream is that of the G650.  Sleek, shiny, and the largest of the Gulfstream family, this aircraft has the ability to take you just about anywhere.  True to the company’s tagline for this aircraft, “Farther faster, first of its kind,” the G650 more than lives up to its standard.

It has done just that with a maximum range of 7,000 miles (you read that right), and an operating speed of 0.925 Mach.  It also has the heaviest takeoff weight at almost 100,000 pounds (that’s a lot of golf clubs, or fuel).

Besides the G650 being visually stunning, the wingspan is the most noticeable at approximately 100 feet which is nearly as long as the aircraft itself.  It also features the most advanced avionics developed by Gulfstream – the PlaneView™ II flight deck.  Like the G550, it has four displays with the EVS, HUD, Synthetic Vision as well as fly-by-wire technology which is computer-controlled and highly redundant – this is advanced as the technology gets.

A Clear Winner?

While Globair.com has their favorite picks which have proven to be popular among used aircraft owners, be sure to do your research when it comes picking the business jet that works for your company.  Remember to read our tips about purchasing an aircraft – while focused on single-engine aircraft, there are some excellent tips to consider.  However, you might want to consider going to a jet broker when it comes to your business needs.

Hopefully you now have a better idea of the common business aircraft on the market – just remember to save your pennies as these sleek, used aircraft run anywhere from $6.4 to $52.9 million!

 

Searching for your next private jet? Click here to visit Globalair.com’s listings. 

 

 

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Aircraft Sales | Aviation Technology | Flying | GlobalAir.com | Aircraft For Sale | Lydia Wiff | NBAA

VIP Terminal Extension at Belfast International Airport Granted

by Joe McDermott 9. January 2017 10:36
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Where safety, efficiency and outstanding customer service are the founding principles of the organisation!

7st January 2016, Belfast International Airport/EGAA, Northern Ireland

Barely 18 months after opening their full service FBO at Belfast International Airport, Global Trek Aviation has been granted permission by the airport to extend their FBO facility building by 100%!

Back in mid 2015 GTA may have been a new start up but with a team of highly experienced industry professionals who had worked for such companies as Landmark Aviation, Ocean Sky and RSS across the UK it quickly became a success!

At Belfast International they built a brand new facility which included a very spacious VIP lounge, crew centre, showers and Operations Control Centre next to the GA Ramp. The facility boasts excellent privacy with its own secure entrance and car park well away from the commercial terminal.

On the ramp an impressive GSE display includes two Jet A-1 trucks (43,000 Litre and 17,000 Litre), three diesel tugs, three Houchin 690-C GPU, 2 wide bodied air stairs, Lav truck, potable water truck, as well as their VIP ground transportation fleet.

Global Trek MD David McColm comments “Our facility has been getting busier by the month and we have taken the decision to plan for future growth at an early stage. Doubling the floor space will allow us to provide even greater comfort for our clients, put in additional amenities and expand our Operations Control Centre to keep up with customer demand”

Brian Carlin, Belfast International Airports Director of Commercial Development in welcoming the expansion plans said “Global Trek has shown the depth of their industry experience and commitment by hitting the ground running, delivering a first class experience to their clients and investing in infrastructure, GSE and personnel training from the very start”

Belfast International Airport Managing Director Graham Keddie added “Global Trek Aviation are proving that BFS is the ideal fuel stop location for corporate, ferry and medevac Transatlantic flights as well as a destination airport.

General Manager Gordon Bingham & Flight Supervisor Philip Armstrong from the The Global Trek Aviation team will be present at SDC2017, Booth 1928

Belfast International Airport, N. Ireland, EGAA/BFS

Belfast International Airport, just 11.5 NM north-west of Belfast City, is the ideal located for North Atlantic tech stops. The airport is CAT IIIB and operates 24H with no curfew restrictions. Multiple runways (9100’ +) ensure no congestion slot restrictions and short taxi times. Global Trek Aviation, with two Jet A-1 trucks dedicated to their clients offer both fast turnaround times and excellent competitive fuel prices.

The airport is owned by Airports Worldwide Inc., the same company which owns Stockholm Skavsta, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Daniel Oduber Quirós International Airport, Mariscal Sucre International Airport and Juan Santamaría International Airport.

OCC EGAA Tel: +0044 289 454546 (24H) OCC EGAA Email: BFS@globaltrekaviation.com Media Contact: David@GlobalTrekAviation.com www.GlobalTrekAviation.com

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Airports | Joe McDermott

What Happens To A Certificate When The FAA Suspends Or Revokes It?

by Greg Reigel 3. January 2017 10:06
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Pilot License

Is a certificate suspension or revocation the end of the story for a certificate holder? Not usually. A certificate holder (whether airman, mechanic, air carrier, medical etc.) has some additional responsibilities, as well as liability exposure if he or she fails to fulfill those obligations. However, before we talk about the aftermath of certificate suspension or revocation, we should briefly discuss how a certificate holder can find him or herself in that position.

Once the FAA has determined that legal enforcement action is appropriate, the FAA will either issue a Notice of Proposed Certificate Action (“NPCA”) to the certificate holder seeking to suspend or revoke a certificate for alleged violation of the FARs, or it will issue an emergency order suspending or revoking the certificate. The difference between the two is significant: the emergency order is effective immediately (e.g. the certificate is revoked as soon as the FAA issues it), while the NPCA is not.

Both an NPCA and an emergency order will provide a recitation of the facts supporting the FAA’s allegations. The NPCA also includes a list of options from which a certificate holder may choose how he or she wants to respond to the NPCA. Under the first option, the certificate holder may elect to simply admit or concede the FAA’s allegations and surrender the certificate to the FAA. The emergency order, on the other hand, requires the certificate holder to immediately surrender the certificate to the FAA.

Suspension or revocation of a certificate may also be imposed by an NTSB administrative law judge (“ALJ”) after the certificate holder has received a hearing on the merits of the allegations contained in the NPCA. In the case of suspension or revocation following a hearing, the ALJ will order that the certificate holder surrender the suspended or revoked certificate to the FAA. The FAA may also follow up with a letter to the certificate holder demanding surrender of the certificate. But, does the certificate holder really have to surrender the certificate? If the case is not appealed, the answer is “yes.”

If a certificate holder fails to surrender the certificate, the FAA can and oftentimes will try to assess a civil penalty against the certificate holder for failure to surrender the certificate as required by the order of suspension or revocation. Under 14 CFR 383.2, depending upon the type of operator (e.g. individual, small business, air carrier etc.), the civil penalties for failure to surrender a certificate can range from $1,414 for an individual (and in some cases a small business) up to $32,140 per day.

So, what do you need to know if you find yourself in this situation? First, if you receive a NPCA or emergency order you need to take action immediately (especially in the case of an emergency order where the time limits are very short) and, if you dispute the FAA’s allegations, you need to properly and timely appeal the order and request an evidentiary hearing. Second, if your appeal is unsuccessful and your certificate is suspended or revoked, you are required to physically surrender your certificate to the FAA. If you fail to do so, you risk being assessed a civil penalty that could potentially be very expensive. And, of course, if you receive an emergency order or NPCA and are unsure of your rights and responsibilities, contact an aviation attorney who can answer your questions and help you through the process.

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Flying | Greg Reigel



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