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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Craigslist Aircraft Sales

by GlobalAir.com 12. February 2018 15:00
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One of the aircraft we considered listing for sale on Craigslist
One of the aircraft we considered listing for sale on Craigslist

Craigslist.com is a website for online classifieds where thousands of people post their items for sale, help wanted, or even go to search for a date. I have personally had success with the website by finding my current rental house advertised when I checked the site on a whim. However, there are hundreds of stories out there of people getting scammed and cheated by buyers and sellers on the site, including a story as recent as this week where a woman lost $1,550 in a Craigslist check fraud scheme. http://buffalonews.com/2018/01/20/woman-says-she-lost-1550-in-craigslist-check-fraud-scheme/

Hundreds of Aircraft For Sale On Craigslist

One might be surprised to learn that there are actually hundreds of aircraft advertised for sale on Craigslist as well. But is it really a good idea to search for such a valuable asset on a site that has had a fairly controversial history? I took a look into the world of buying an aircraft on Craigslist and I want to share the good, bad, and ugly of what I found. As always, common good aircraft buying practices should be followed, such as getting a pre-purchase inspection and a title search showing a clear title. If possible, purchasers should seek out a purchase agreement in order to protect both parties. Proceed with caution, but maybe don’t overlook Craigslist in your search for your dream airplane.

The Good

Unlike your regular aircraft for sale websites, Craigslist doesn’t have much of a filter for what aircraft related things people can post. Most searches lead to listings of aircraft parts, advertisements for flight schools, and even a few pilots looking to find others to start a “timeshare” type of deal with their existing planes. It should certainly be mentioned that these can be good opportunities, and you just might find a way to save money by sharing a great plane with other owners instead of buying one.

This is also one of the cheapest options for listing your plane, as it appears there are no listing fees for individual sellers. If you’re selling from a dealership you do incur some fees, but they’re only $5 per listing. You are able to reach a large audience with this website, because it has such a large following to begin with. https://www.craigslist.org/about/help/posting_fees

The Bad

One difficult thing about searching for an aircraft for sale on Craigslist is that the site is organized in a very specific way that does not encourage searching locations other than your own. Instead of simply searching “aircraft for sale” and seeing all aircraft listed on the site, you have to first drill into the Craigslist page for the area where you want to look. Most major cities and counties are included, but having to search through pages and pages of these just to find the aircraft in the first place is overwhelming. The idea behind Craigslist is that you’re buying from people in the local community, but a good deal on an aircraft that you’ve been looking for could very well be thousands of miles away. This isn’t a problem on other aircraft for sale sites, because they mostly list by aircraft category and rarely by location.

A big thing to keep in mind when buying or selling on Craigslist is that the website has no control over the transaction. They do not guarantee purchases, process payments, and there is certainly no Craigslist seller verification process. They have done a lot to cover their butts in case something goes wrong, so they will almost never be found liable for a purchase gone wrong.

The Ugly

During my research on the topic I did find a pretty hilarious article where someone was trying to sell their Cessna 172 H on Craigslist… Using a photograph of the plane lying upside-down on its back. Evidently the ’68 Cessna got flipped when a tornado went through town, but the owner was still asking for $16,500. It has since been flipped and sold, but I’m not sure I would purchase a 172 in that condition!

https://jalopnik.com/5941947/this-upside-down-airplane-is-for-sale-and-can-be-yours

Another notable “best of Craigslist” is the Corvette-Mooney hybrid that a man made in his backyard. By putting the fuselage of a 1963 Mooney on the frame of a 1984 Corvette, the seller has created the most hideous hybrid of car and airplane one could think of. Not even bothering to match the paint schemes, the red of the Corvette does little to blend with the white and blue of the Mooney. Perhaps intentionally colors of the USA? I hope this is a joke, but it has to be seen to be believed.

https://jalopnik.com/this-backyard-airplane-corvette-monster-is-pretty-much-1750179686

 

Perhaps a better use of Craigslist would be to search for aircraft parts or flight schools. In the end, Craigslist is little more than a community bulletin board where legitimate sellers and scammers alike can post whatever they please. Proceeding with caution is the best way to start your aircraft search on this site, but you just might find a treasure if you look hard enough and be patient.

One of the aircraft we considered listing for sale on Craigslist
One of the aircraft we considered listing for sale on Craigslist

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Aviation Safety | GlobalAir.com

What You Should Know About eBay Aircraft Sales

by GlobalAir.com 12. February 2018 14:06
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We considered listing this plane for sale on eBay
One of the aircraft we considered listing for sale on eBay

When it comes to making any large purchase, being thoughtful and thorough is of the upmost importance. This is true for homes, cars, and especially for airplanes. An airplane is an investment that will hopefully last you years, and absolutely must keep you safe to the best of its abilities when you fly it.

In general, people are wary of where their large ticket items come from. They like to have a full description of the item that is without any deception or misinformation. Typically it is preferred to have a way to inspect the purchase up close, but with aircraft and other online purchases this may be difficult because it is located far away.

One might be surprised to learn that in a Google search for “Aircraft for Sale,” eBay is one of the top results in the first page. Of course, when you search for any number of things followed by “for sale,” eBay also appears on the first page. They’ve been in the business of connecting sellers to buyers for 22 years now. While some may be quick to discount eBay as an unreliable or sketchy source for aircraft sales, there are certainly pros as well as cons to purchasing through their site.

After consulting a few industry experts, reading online forums, and browsing the selection of aircraft for myself, I have come to the conclusion that you just might find a perfectly good aircraft listed on eBay. However, you may have to proceed with more caution than on specific “aircraft for sale” websites. Let’s break it down into the pros and cons.

Pros and Cons of buying Airplanes of Ebay

For the Buyer

Con:

It may be difficult to inspect

As mentioned earlier, the perfect deal is likely not sitting in your backyard. Aircraft can be list a few states away, and without having the ease of heading over to inspect it up close, you may end up buying it sight unseen. eBay did think of this, and you can hire the people are We Go Look to inspect your purchase for you, typically for less than $100.

https://wegolook.com

Pro:

The bid is non-binding.

When you place a bid on eBay Motors, which includes all of their aircraft listings, the bid is non-binding. This simply means that your bid expresses interest in the airplane, but it is not a binding contract between you and the seller. That can be comforting when you want to get your foot in the door but you would still like to read over all the paperwork associated with the plane before you dive in with a purchase.

http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/non-binding-bid.html#fineprint

For the Seller:

Con:

It may be expensive to list

The terms and conditions on eBay’s site says that there is an $125 fee on listings that are more than $5000 if you list less than 6 vehicles per calendar year. Additionally, the seller has to pay more to have extra photos, extend the listing for more than 7 days, to have their header in bold, and a few other extra features. These numbers can add up quickly, as compared to other aircraft for sale websites where the first listing is often free, and the following ones are at a steep discount. http://pages.ebay.com/help/sell/motorfees.html#volume

Pro:

Your plane is exposed to a larger audience

Although eBay is not as big as it used to be, it does still have a large following. Some old-school aircraft purchasers still check the site, as is evident by the aircraft buyer forums I browsed. Having extra exposure across multiple buying platforms can help your aircraft get noticed and sold, which is the ultimate goal.

Regardless of if you’re buying or selling, you must have your paperwork in order. Any purchase should still be contingent upon a title search showing clear title and a satisfactory pre-purchase inspection.  If you opt to purchase it without a pre-purchase inspection, you are taking a risk that may not be worth it. Some of the most repeated advice for aircraft purchases is to be patient. It may seem like your dream airplane but being thorough with paperwork and inspections is vital.

Another more practical way to utilize eBay is to purchase aircraft parts. You can find some pretty good deals on old parts that only need a little work to look new. If you look at the storefront for Universal Asset Management, you’ll be able to find authentic, rare parts from decommissioned commercial airliners. I found a Russian “EXIT” sign, a flight recorder, and a parking break panel. They have hundreds more treasures listed on their site that do not carry quite the amount of risk involved with purchasing an entire plane.

http://stores.ebay.com/Universal-Asset-Management/_i.html

One more thing:

You may find some hidden treasures.

During my browsing of the eBay airplane listings, I also happened upon an advertisement for 10 hours PIC of multi-engine time in a Piper PA 30 Twin Comanche. In this case the seller is using eBay as a sort of classifieds, reaching a whole new audience that may be thinking about getting their Multi-engine add-on. This is a clever tactic and could be capitalized on if it isn’t against eBay’s terms and conditions!


We ended up choosing not to sell this plane on eBay

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Aircraft Sales | GlobalAir.com | Aircraft For Sale

The Aircraft Acquisition Plan - Sources Of Information

by David Wyndham 12. February 2018 11:00
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In the two previous issues, I discussed that the foundation of the Aircraft Acquisition Plan is to understand the aviation mission. That understanding leads to identifying the key missions of the aviation function. Those most important missions are what allow you to derive a set of objective evaluation parameters. Those mission-specific parameters can include payload, passenger seats, range, runway performance etc.

Given a set of parameters, you will need to find out which aircraft are capable of meeting those parameters. For example, if you are an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) operator, you may need to carry 2 liter patients plus two attendants. You may also need to lift that load from a 3,000 foot elevation on an 86F (30C) day. You know the capabilities of your current EMS helicopter. Where do you get the information about possible replacement helicopters? What about performance on specific trips such as London City airport to Cairo, Egypt? What about the maximum payload you can depart Eagle, Colorado and make Charlotte, North Carolina non-stop? There is generally available data and specific data calculations. 

There are three generally available categories of published sources of information and data. Trade publications, off-the-shelf databases and the manufacturer published data.

Trade Publications. There are a number of excellent publications that publish surveys, list performance reviews/pilot reports, and have new aircraft pricing. These magazines are readily available via subscription. In addition to hard copy, many have electronic copies and some maintain past issues on their website. The cost to receive them is nominal. This is a good first step to get general information. The ones with pilot reports may have more technical information versus general product reviews. These articles may not answer your detailed questions or cover all the aircraft models you are interested in.

Published Databases. There are a number of databases published in the US that can provide a great deal of useful information. They cover four areas: acquisition costs, operating costs, performance and specifications, and specialized data. While trade magazines usually do a good lob of listing new aircraft process, they don't have a lot of information on pre-owned process. Information that is published on acquisition costs relies on sellers or buyers reporting their transactions to the publisher. Not every transaction is reported and there is a time lag in the reporting of a transaction and the ability of a publisher to analyze and publish their data. When markets are changing rapidly, this data has less value than in a stable used market.

Operating cost databases focus on the day-to-day costs of owning and operating aircraft, including taxes and fixed costs such as insurance.  Operating cost databases also have limitations. No two operators operate their aircraft in the exact same way.  Some operators do much of the routine maintenance in-house while others use a service center. Unscheduled maintenance is just that, unscheduled. There is no way to predict unscheduled maintenance save for using generalities and defining assumptions. Guaranteed hourly maintenance programs may help, but each manufacturer or program seller will use different assumptions and many allow for some variability in charging based on utilization. As they say with automobiles, “your mileage may vary.” These databases can be a valuable tools for comparing relative costs, but aircraft costing is not an exact science!

Performance and specification databases are useful provided that the person using them is knowledgeable about aircraft performance.  They go into more detail than many magazine articles and they tend to have standardized formats for each category of aircraft. These generally come in software versions. Unless you buy the flight manuals or subscribe to a database that offers that level of detail, the ability to change the data for your exact mission can be limited. Again, as a relative comparison tool, they can be invaluable. 

Costs of the above databases vary from several hundred dollars to over $1,000 for complete sets. They tend to offer a fair amount of detail, are impartial, and given the time involved in gathering each bit of information on your own, a very worthwhile investment. Our company has published a number of these types of databases for over 30 years.

Other specialized databases do exist. They can be for things such as charter listings, aircraft for sale listings, airport databases, and en route winds and temperature statistics. Depending on your mission, they still may not answer the very specific question that you may have.

Manufacturer's Data. The information from the aircraft manufacturer can range from the sales brochures' optimistic, best case information, to very specific performance analyses. Be cautious reading generalized sales information as they may or may not conform to standardized criteria. They may also be out of date. The flight manuals are the best source for specific calculations. Buying them for one-off comparisons can be quite expensive, especially when researching a number of different aircraft models. 

Detailed performance questions can be easily answered by the manufacturer. Contacting the manufacturer does inform them of your interest and usually generates sales calls and perhaps a visit form your local aircraft sales person.  If you wish to maintain your anonymity, you may wish to order a technical manual through the product support group. 

What are the other sources? Consultants can be paid to do all or part of the work in the Aircraft Acquisition Plan. When we do a study for someone, we work closely with both the aviation professionals and well as the end user to make sure all the right questions are asked, and answered. Other operators can be a wealth of "inside" information, as are maintenance facilities and training companies. When asking questions, be specific. Ask a general question, get a general answer. List price is not necessarily selling price, nor does a flat-rate cost for an inspection tell you what to allow for unscheduled and “over and above” maintenance.  

When gathering data, keep in mind the following:

What is the reliability of the source?

What assumptions went into the data?

How would specific information apply to your situation?

In general, starting with the publicly available data allows you to develop a short-list of candidate aircraft. If you want an aircraft with 2,800 nautical mile (NM) range, an aircraft with 2,300 NM is probably not going to be your top choice. Next time I’ll get into the analysis of the numbers.


 

 

 

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Aircraft Sales | Aviation Technology | David Wyndham | Flight Department

How To Respond To A Request For Re-Examination

by Greg Reigel 2. February 2018 09:41
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If you are involved in an accident or incident and the FAA finds out about it, which it usually does, it is quite possible that you may receive a letter from the FAA requesting that you submit to “reexamination.” This is also commonly referred to as a “709 Ride.” If you receive a letter like this, what are your options?

What Is The Request For Re-Examination?

The request for reexamination is based upon the FAA’s authority to re-examine an airman holding a certificate or rating (pilot, flight instructor, airframe and powerplant etc.) at any time pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 44709(a). When the FAA discovers evidence that leads it to question an airman’s qualifications to exercise the privileges of the applicable certificate or rating, the FAA issues the request requiring the airman to demonstrate that he or she does, in fact, still have the qualifications for the applicable certificate or rating. Incidents such as gear-up landings and uncontrolled departure from the runway are examples of situations involving circumstances that very well may lead the FAA to question an airman’s qualifications.

You may be wondering whether a request for reexamination is proper if the accident or incident was not the airman’s fault. For example, if the accident or incident was caused by a mechanical failure is that still enough for the FAA to request reexamination? Unfortunately, unless the mechanical failure is obvious to the FAA as the sole cause of the incident, a request for re-examination is likely to be considered reasonable. Why? Because the FAA only has have “sufficient reason to believe that an airman may not be qualified to exercise the privileges of a particular certificate or rating.” If it does, the re-examination request is considered reasonable, without regard to the likelihood that a lack of competence had actually played a role in the event.

According to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 7, “[t]here must be ample or probable cause for requesting the reexamination” including reliable reports, personal knowledge, or evidence obtained through an accident, incident, or enforcement investigation. Thus, the “lack of competence” has to be supported by the facts and circumstances in the case. However, as long as a basis for questioning an airman’s competence has been implicated, rather than actually demonstrated, the request is considered reasonable.

The Re-Examination Request

The procedures for the reexamination are set out in Order 8900.1. The Flight Standards District Office (“FSDO”) responsible for the area within which the accident or incident occurred will send the airman a letter requesting re-examination, via certified mail, return receipt requested. The letter will include (1) the reasons for the re-examination; (2) the specific certificate and/or rating for which the re-examination is necessary; (3) the type of re-examination (e.g. the tasks the airman will be required to perform); (4) the category and class of aircraft required (if applicable); (5) the location of the re-examination; and (6) a time limit for accomplishing the re-examination.

After the airman receives the letter, the airman usually has fifteen (15) days within which to complete the re-examination, although this is not always the case. If an airman was injured in an accident and his or her physical condition precludes completion of the re-examination or if the airman needs more than fifteen (15) days within which to practice/prepare for the ride, the re-examination may be postponed. Under these circumstances the FAA may require that the airman surrender his or her airman certificate and the FAA will issue a 30-day temporary certificate for the airman to operate under until the re-examination.

As a practical matter, it is not uncommon for a reexamination to actually be conducted after the fifteen (15) day period. This is especially true if the reexamination has to be conducted in an aircraft requiring a type certificate since the reexamination will need to be conducted by an FAA inspector who also holds a type certificate in the applicable aircraft. It is may also be possible to schedule the reexamination to be conducted in connection with an upcoming training event. As long as the airman is communicating with the FSDO and/or inspector, it is usually possible to get the reexamination scheduled without having to surrender the applicable certificate or rating.

However, if the FAA believes the airman will be operating commercially while carrying passengers, the FAA may demand that the re-examination occur within less than fifteen (15) days. In this situation, if the airman is unable or refuses to submit to the re-examination within the time specified, the airman may actually have to surrender his or her certificate or rating.

If the airman is required to surrender his or her certificate or rating, the airman may then obtain dual instruction from a certificated flight instructor in preparation for the ride or, if the airman finds it necessary to conduct solo practice, the FAA may issue a temporary airman certificate, valid for thirty (30) days, rather than the one-hundred twenty (120) day period usually allowed with a temporary certificate. However, if a temporary certificate is issued, the certificate/ratings for which the airman is to be re-examined will have the limitation "For Student Pilot Purposes Only-Passenger Carrying Prohibited”.

If an airman wants to surrender his or her certificate, the airman should not simply show up at the FSDO and hand it over. The certificate should be delivered with a letter in which the airman confirms that the certificate is only be surrendered on a temporary basis and that the airman reserves all privileges, rights and remedies with respect to the certificate and any potential adverse action the FAA may decide to take. An aviation attorney can help to draft this letter and/or assist with the logistics of the surrender.

The reexamination does not necessarily have to be scheduled with the FSDO that issues the request. If the accident or incident occurred somewhere other than the airman’s home area, the airman can request that the re-examination be administered by the airman’s home FSDO. Or, if the inspector or FSDO issuing the request has a less favorable reputation, which some of them certainly do, then the airman will likely benefit from having the reexamination conducted by a different inspector or FSDO. In this situation, the airman’s home FSDO would contact the FSDO issuing the letter requesting the re-examination and coordinate with that FSDO on the tasks to be re-examined and if any further enforcement action is necessary after the actual ride.

If the airman fails or refuses to submit to a reexamination within a reasonable period of time, the FAA will initiate emergency enforcement action to suspend the airman's certificate. Although the airman has the ability to respond to or appeal the emergency suspension, if the FAA has a reasonable basis for the request and the airman has no other defenses, the airman will likely end up with a suspension of his or her airman certificate pending submission to and successful completion of the re-examination.

What Happens During The Re-examination?

The re-examination is similar to a check-ride, except that the airman is not typically subject to examination on all of the required tasks in the Airman Certification Standards (“ACS”) (or the practical test standards for those certificates/ratings for which the FAA has not yet issued ACS) for the certificate or rating upon which the airman is being re-examined. Rather, the re-examination involves the tasks that were called into question by the occurrence of the accident or incident and it is conducted in accordance with the ACS for the certificate or rating involved. The tasks may include components of the knowledge test, the skill or flight test, or both.

Since the re-examination is a check-ride, it is important to make sure that the tasks are reasonably related to circumstances that gave the FAA a reason to question the airman’s qualifications. For example, if an airman was merely taxiing an aircraft and departed the taxiway, a request for re-examination based upon that incident shouldn’t include instrument navigation or cross country flight planning. If the request for re-examination includes tasks that do not appear to be reasonably related to the circumstances, the airman should object and request that those items be removed from the request. Although such a request isn’t always granted, if the airman, or his or her aviation attorney, is able to convince the inspector that the tasks are beyond the reasonable scope permitted under the regulations, then it is often possible to have those tasks removed. The inspector can fail the airman for any maneuver, procedure or knowledge deficiency in which the airman is found to be unqualified. This includes any of the specific task upon which the airman is being re-examined (which is why it is best to limit the tasks as much as possible). Additionally, if the inspector observes any deficient areas other than those that are the subject of the re-examination at any time during the re-examination, those deficiencies could also be the basis for failure of the test.

If the airman successfully completes the re-examination, one of two things will happen: (1) if the airman's certificate was suspended pending completion of the re-examination, the inspector will issue a letter of results and may issue a temporary certificate that bears all ratings and limitations from the original certificate; or (2) if the airman's certificate was not suspended pending completion of the re-examination, the inspector will simply issue a letter of results and the airman may then continue to exercise the privileges of his or her certificate and/or ratings.

If the airman fails to successfully complete the re-examination, the inspector will inform the airman in detail of each deficiency. Additionally, if the airman's original certificate was surrendered in exchange for a temporary certificate and the term of the temporary certificate has time left on it, the inspector will decide whether to suspend the certificate or to extend the temporary certificate for an additional 30 days.

In the latter instance, if the inspector believes the airman could successfully complete another re-examination if he or she obtained additional instruction, another 30-day temporary certificate will be issued with a limitation against carrying passengers. The airman will then have to submit to an additional re-examination within that 30-day period. In the first instance, when the inspector determines the airman is not qualified to hold the certificate or rating, the airman can expect to be the subject of enforcement action seeking revocation of his or her certificate and/or ratings.

Conclusion

If you are involved in an accident or incident in which pilot error is a possible cause of the accident or incident and the FAA finds out, don’t be surprised if you receive a certified letter requesting that you submit to re-examination. The first thing you need to do is review the scope of the re-examination request and objectively determine whether the FAA has a reasonable basis for making the request. Often, it will.

Next, you need to decide how you want to respond. Although the request for re-examination can be intimidating and frustrating, especially if it follows an accident or incident in which your aircraft and/or your pride has been damaged, it is possible to treat it as a positive experience and use it as an opportunity to improve your skills as an aviator. This is especially true if you take the ride with an inspector who approaches the situation from a similar perspective.

However, if you find yourself facing a request for reexamination with an inspector who does not approach the ride from this perspective or if you have questions regarding the basis for the request or the procedures that should be followed, an aviation attorney can certainly assist you in the process. After all, you worked hard to obtain your certificate(s) and/or rating(s). Make sure you protect your ability to exercise those privileges and to fly safely.

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Greg Reigel

The Robird: Coming Soon to a Sky Near You

by Tori Williams 1. February 2018 08:00
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During a research project for my Airport Manager Certification class (which is really just studying for the AAAE CM exam), I happened upon a video of one of the most interesting Wildlife Management technologies I've ever seen. The video featured the "Robird," which is an Unmanned Aerial System designed to look and fly exactly as a bird of prey does. Created by the company Clear Flight Solutions in the Netherlands, the bird uses UAS technology to be remotely controlled from the ground by a certified pilot. The bird can be used in several scenarios where birds may be a hazard to the surrounding environment, but especially at airports where birds pose a threat to safe flight operations. The body of the UAS is painted with faux feathers, eyes and a beak to increase the lifelike appearance. This device comes in two models, the Eagle and the Falcon, replicating their respective birds of prey.

To begin their marvelous flight, one person uses their hands to hold the drone up into the air while the pilot uses their controls to makes the bird come to life and start flapping its wings. A slight mechanical buzz is heard, but nothing that would give the bird away to his avian enemies. The assistant then launches the drone forward, sending it into the skies and on towards its mission. The small but mighty UAS is able to reach speeds of up to 50 miles per hour, a big selling point for those looking to take their wildlife management tactics to the next level.

A flying robot has many unique challenges. It has to be lightweight enough to soar through the air, but the body must contain all of the necessary mechanical parts, resulting in extra weight. The engineers were able to give the birds perfect weights (the Falcon is 1.6 pounds and the Eagle is 4.5 pounds) by creating the bodies out of nylon composite with glass fiber and utilizing a lithium polymer battery. The wings are 3D printed, and the machine is assembled by hand.

The most important technology of the Robird is how Clear Flight Solutions has managed to make the robot look incredibly lifelike, completely indistinguishable from a real bird of prey from even a short distance away. This is achieved not only by the immaculate paint job on the robot, but the way that it flaps its wings and has a flight behavior eerily similar to the real birds. This is achieved by having each foam wing flex into different degrees across its length.

The pilot is always able to control exactly where the bird flies, so it is safe in even the busiest airfields. Because it utilizes drone technology, it will be easy to regulate and classify the device for Airport Certification Manuals. The creators of the device are quoted as saying, “it can be tempting to put too much technology into the bird,” and seem to want their device to be useful because it is simple, rather than too technological to operate daily.

The goal when using this robot is to scare away unwanted wildlife from active airfields, providing efficient wildlife management and drastically reducing the occurrences of bird strikes. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, birds make up 97% of reported wildlife strikes. Seeing as they are the most common wildlife hazard, airport managers must often target them specifically.

Birds have shown a tendency to become accustomed to other traditional means of wildlife management, such as loud noises or statues of owls. Clear Flight Solutions claims that as use of their Robird continues on the airfield, the birds will learn to avoid the supposed “hunting ground” of the creature, and the problematic populations will dwindle. In a series of test flights they were able to reduce the bird population in the affected area by 75 percent over time.

This is a new and exciting technology, and I am interested to see how this bird drone develops further into the future. Check out the video below to see the realistic flight patterns of the Robird. The future is now!

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Flying | Tori Williams



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