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Aviation News Rundown: A tribute to a local friend of the airport, plus news on the Boeing 787 and Cessna Citation

Longtime Bowman Field (LOU) airman Richard C. "Dick" Mulloy died Saturday. That is Mulloy above, in an image furnished by the Aero Club of Louisville, which published this about his life:

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Dick distinguished himself by playing in each of the post prestigious New Year’s Day Bowl games: The Sugar Bowl in 1940, the Rose Bowl in 1939 and the Orange Bowl in 1938, all for the University of Tennessee.

 

In addition to his football at Tennessee, he played football and baseball at St. Xavier High School in Kentucky, and was named All-State during his senior year. Once at Tennessee, he earned three letters in football and three in basketball. His 1940 football team was undefeated, untied and never scored on.

 

While at Tennessee he learned to fly, and in 1941, he entered the civilian pilot training program and later became a pilot instructor in the U. S. Army Primary Flying School. Later during World War II, he went to work for Chiang Kai-Shek under contract to the Chinese National Airlines flying “The Hump” across the Himalayas.

 

Following the war, Dick returned to Louisville and formed Kentucky Flying Service at Bowman Field. He built the organization over the years, operating out of the large hangar where they overhauled, maintained and sold aircraft.

 

In addition, Dick is credited with training more pilots than anyone else in this part of the country.

 

In 1987, he sold Kentucky Flying Service, and in 1992, he sold Helicopters, Inc., completing 47 years of operations at Bowman Field.

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In the news today, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week cites JP Morgan as saying the business jet market is "still in the doldrums," but recovery may only be a few quarters away. On the commercial side, the ax of poor economy continues to strike, as Reuters reports that Bahrain's state-owned Gulf Air has cut 500 jobs in the past six months.

On the positive side of commercial aviation, something that and can be seen as good news for Boeing's next generation of aircraft, the Gerson Lehrman Group notes that for every airliner cancelling a 787 order, another eager buyer is willing to take its place.

Finally, here are two industry announcements worth noting. Cessna introduced a program yesterday to reduce lead times for interior refurbishments on older Citations by stocking pre-selected, certified interior materials under a new program.

While the NBAA touted a resolution from the United States Senate that applauds general and business aviation for its efforts to provide relief to Haiti following the devastating earthquake in that nation early this year.

GA aircraft made more than 4,500 flights to Haiti during the first month following the disaster — when the airport and infrastructure were in shambles. At the same time, business aircraft performed more than 700 flights, transporting 3,500 passengers and delivering in excess of 1 million pounds of cargo and supplies.

Euro-volcano update


 


                                                                          Photograph courtesy Árni Sæberg, Icelandic Coast Guard


The Eurocontrol press office reports that flights were down by about 500 today (less than 2 percent), compared to 1,500 off on Sunday (roughly 7 percent). Tomorrow's volume could be reduced another 500 flights.

An area of ash in the North Atlantic continues to affect flight paths of jets into North America, making trips longer and costlier.

Read more via AviationNews.Us here.

And via the Australian Broadcasting Corporation here.

Daviator versus Goliath

The epic battle waged this past fall between the general aviation community and lawmakers over user fees was re-examined today in an article by GlobalAir.com contributer and Corporate Flight Management, Inc., CEO Allen Howell.

On his blog, PlaneConversations.com, Howell recounts the efforts of the Airline Transport Association and others, via mainstream media, to shift public perception of general aviation to that of, "fat cats who ride around in big corporate jets wallowing in corporate excess while asking for government bailouts."

Most of us thought it to be a losing battle but, still, none of us would go down without a fight. I can’t speak for the organizations that represent us, but at the time I think they probably saw the battle as an uphill fight. The organizations that supported our interests seemed to be behind the power curve and lacked the money to work the Hill the old fashioned way.  

From this recent win for the little guy, Howell says the term 'We the People' may have new meaning in today's political climate.

Read the full story here.

Morning Rundown: This week starts off where last week ended

As we start the second full week in May, the biggest stories in aviation carry over from the first week.

Optimism is abundant among the industry, at least when judging by tradeshow turnout. EBAA President Brian Humphries said this year’s EBACE was the highest attended in history, with more people coming through the turnstiles in the first day of the 2010 convention than during the entire 2009 show.

Businesses and organizations filled more than 430 booths, alongside more than 60 aircraft featured in static displays.

Staying with Europe this morning where the skies are somewhat the same, bothersome. Rehashing the ash – volcanic ash – Monday again saw airport closures in Spain and elsewhere. Heathrow Airport reported passenger traffic down nearly 21 percent in April compared to the prior year, largely due to the eruption. Cargo traffic at the hub, however, was up 7.8 percent last month in metric tonnage.

In domestic airport news, Million Air celebrated the ‘soft opening’ of its facility at San Bernardino International Airport (SBD). An official grand opening will take place this summer.

From the desk of unfortunate irony this morning: As the media reports on the environmental and ecological damage suffered in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of a massive BP oilrig spill, the footprint of journalists in the area may be causing its own negative repercussions on regional wildlife.

Audubon Magazine reports that press helicopters have been flying illegally over Breton National Wildlife Refuge, a coastal bird sanctuary, causing disturbances. As oil has washed ashore, the facility has closed, creating a rough situation for those who care for the birds and other species.  

From the Audubon blog post linked above:

“We’ve done all this work to try and protect those islands with booms,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokesperson Chuck Underwood. “But in the end, folks flying in low and landing just to get their photographs has been disturbing the birds. In some cases, there has even been nest abandonment.”    

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