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Cashing in on that $100 hamburger

With the weekend finally here, many recreational pilots will take to the sky with a tiding of good weather in search of that ever-allusive $100 hamburger.

While fuel and rental costs mean that burger likely will cost $200 or more, it’s the thrill of the flight that certainly outweighs the cost of getting to the meal.

Enjoy the journey, not the destination, right?

There are several great sites online to assist in finding where to land for that pancake, burger or whatever meal you desire, many of them featuring user feedback to know what others think of a place. Such tools help eliminate the dread of flying two hours to an unknown spot only to receive poor service.

Of course, right here on our site you can plug your destination into our Airport Resource Center and find a rental car, hotel, $100 hamburger, FBO or any other service you may need after landing. And our Max-Trax software is built to save you money on fuel along your route.

Other great sites for the pilot with the picky palette include Fly2Lunch.com. It features a great search tool, and its only setback is the lack of information at listed airports. (There are no diners listed on the site for FXE, FLL, OSH or even our beloved LOU).  

AdventurePilot.com provides a useful virtual map. Users plug in a home airport and set a nautical-mile radius. Press enter and see dozens, if not hundreds, of surrounding spots to play, eat, and sleep.

Perhaps the most simple and user-interactive $100 hamburger site is Flyingfood.com. Starting with its national map, a navigator can double click to zoom to a particular region, honing in on user-reviewed eateries. The numbers hovering above a location indicate the user rating of a spot.

Perhaps these tools keep you a happy pilot and never a hungry pilot.

If you happen to be flying to Louisville, I strongly recommend a stop at W.W. Cousins for your $100 hamburger. The staff cooks delicious burgers to order and bakes buns and desserts on site. A mile-long topping bar lets you pile on anything under the sun, from sweet pepper relish, jalapenos, Dusseldorf mustard and even fancy ketchup, you will find it all.

And it’s only a mile from Bowman Field. Perfect.

Please let us know about your endeavors to get a $100 (or however much it costs) hamburger in the comments section. And happy flying.

Advice on looking for an aircraft broker (via PlaneConversations.com)

Our friends at PlaneConversations.com posted an informative piece in the world of aircraft sales. Part of a larger series, it gives a breakdown of what to look when choosing an aircraft broker or dealer.

Like all professions, the aircraft brokerage business has people who do their jobs well, those who do their jobs poorly, and others in between.  Some of the most reputable brokers I know do not own aircraft inventory themselves.  However, if a broker (someone selling somebone else’s aircraft) is also a dealer (someone who buys aircraft for his own inventory), then it stands to reason that they know a little something about purchasing an aircraft.  So, find out whether your buyer’s agent/broker is also a dealer.Like all professions, the aircraft brokerage business has people who do their jobs well, those who do their jobs poorly, and others in between.  Some of the most reputable brokers I know do not own aircraft inventory themselves.  However, if a broker (someone selling somebone else’s aircraft) is also a dealer (someone who buys aircraft for his own inventory), then it stands to reason that they know a little something about purchasing an aircraft.  So, find out whether your buyer’s agent/broker is also a dealer.

Read the full piece here.

Morning Rundown: Casual Friday

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With EBACE wrapped up, it looks like a somewhat slow Friday morning in the world of aviation. Attention spans dwindle. Imaginations run to the big cookout or trip to lake this weekend. Before we get to all that, though, we shall throw some news and links your way. 

EBACE kept a positive note throughout, in what was the highest attended since 2007 and the second highest in the event's history. Michael A. Taverna of Aviation Week wraps up coverage by again focusing on business being on an uptick in the first quarter of 2010.

JSSI announced it has enrolled its 1,000th engine on its coverage plan.

England's Prince Henry learned today that he will train to fly Apache helicopters for the British Army. He hopes to return to action in Afghanistan.

For those of you who want more than news on this casual Friday, it is recommended to check out WINGsReality, an Internet-based reality-style series where pilots practice in emergency scenarios, then get judged by a panel. Check out the show, hosted at AtlantaWebFoundry.com, where we also found the video embedded above.

Finally, a good weekend to all. We wish a Happy Mother's Day to the moms in your families. In celebration, here is a link from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum that highlights the history of women in aviation.

 

Tense exchange between ATC and pilot at JFK

A recording posted on LiveATC.net Wednesday evening dictates an American Airlines Boeing 767 pilot telling the tower at JFK airport that he will declare an emergency if he cannot land on a particular runway.

From a New York Post article:

Morning Rundown: more EBACE, more volcano, Gulfstream news and new NOTAM system

The aviation world's spotlight continued to shine on Europe Wednesday, despite the layers of ash in the upper atmosphere.

David Learmount of Flight Global echoed the recurring theme reported most everywhere from EBACE this week -- that recovery in the industry will come at a slow pace. It focuses on comments from Richard Aboulafia, chief analyst of the Teal Group, and says return to robust activity in aircraft sales may not arrive in full until 2012. 

Jeremy Cox of Jetbrokers, Inc., reports directly from EBACE on his blog. He says a lobby bar during the first night was packed with people eager to make deals.

Cox also mentions that the Gulfstream G650 gained the title of world's fastest business jet. Flying at Mach 0.925 on Sunday, it strips the ranking from Cessna's Citation X.

Gulfstream chief Joe Lombardo spoke at EBACE on how European growth has helped solidify the business jet market and, in what has become a secondary theme at the convention, he looked forward to growth in developing nations. A decade ago, there were only 27 Gulfstream aircraft in Asia. That number stands at more than 100 today. 

The other emerging story in Europe was the return of the volcanic ash that shut down air travel throughout the continent last month. This time, though, the effects have been more localized.

Ryanair canceled its flight between Malta and Edinburgh on Wednesday. Airports in Ireland and Scotland reopened this morning as the ash moved west.

While most of the news in aviation took place across the Atlantic, there were a couple developments of interest announced in the U.S.

The FAA announced a digital NOTAM system going live in Atlantic City. The link in the prior sentence includes details on the system. Other airports to join the program in the next round are Washington Dulles, Reagan National, Baltimore-Washington International, Richmond, Norfolk, Denver, Chicago O’Hare and Midway, Memphis, Fairbanks, Alaska and Ft. Wayne, Ind.

In a final note, NASA tested an astronaut escape rocket for its Orion spacecraft in New Mexico this morning. It was a success that "went like clockwork," even as the future-of-space-travel program itself is being restructured. 

 

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