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5 Major Items Pilots Miss During Their Preflight Inspection

by GlobalAir.com 5. June 2017 17:02
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Perhaps the most critical part of any general aviation flight is the preflight inspection of the aircraft. For most pilots, the preflight inspection follows a checklist along with a routine flow around the aircraft. Most pilots and student pilots perform what would be considered a sufficient inspection, following their checklist and routine items.

Surely 100% of pilots would be able to find discrepancies if they were present right?

Well...not exactly. Sit down, strap yourself in and get ready to read some interesting real-life statistics!

Every year at the Sun N Fun airshow the FAA partners with a local flight school to host the Project Preflight event. The purpose of the event is to test the preflight efficiency of pilots and student pilots of all ages, hours and experience. A flight school volunteers one of their airplanes for the event. Participants are invited to preflight the aircraft like they would before any other flight – checking the fuel, oil, tire pressure and anything with blue tape is unnecessary. The catch is, the aircraft has several intentional discrepancies, some are major squawks! This year we hosted the event and gathered the data from 144 total participants.

Here are the results...

Water Bottle Lodged Behind Rudder Pedals – Out of 144 participants only 30% found this major discrepancy.

Cotter Pin Missing In Right Wheel – Only 28% found this one!

Elevator Nut Missing – 39% found the nut to missing from the right side of the elevator.

Rag Behind The Alternator – Easy to spot but only 63% of participants found the rag!

Cotter Pin In Control Lock – Only 42% found a small cotter pin in place of the control lock, hard to miss but deadly if left in.

Interesting right?! The statistics are concerning to say the least, but what a great insight into a previously unknown sector of general aviation that can be used to educate pilots and future pilots.

So how can we improve these statistics?

Yes, of course we can say “pilots need to be more thorough in their inspections” or “we need to apply more focus and attention to detail during a preflight” but what are some other realistic strategies we can implement to actually achieve that?! Here’s one – maybe it’s extreme and definitely hypothetical but it’s worth pondering.

Again, hypothetical but let’s break it down. We need pilots to perform thorough inspections, how can you put yourself in that “attentive” frame of mind? If you’ve ever rotated the tires on your vehicle yourself, isn’t it likely that you’ll double check and triple check the tightness of the lug nuts before you call it a job done? The theory is that you’ll be taking more responsibility for the state of the aircraft rather than assuming the mechanic or previous pilot left the aircraft in an airworthy condition. This doesn’t mean you should become an aircraft mechanic or add an hour to your preflight, the goal is to find a way to improve our attention and focus when preflighting an airplane.

Project Preflight was certainly educational and we had an absolute blast hosting the event. On behalf of SunState Aviation we would like to thank all of the 144 participants for stopping by and giving us your time, without you this educational piece and the safety of future pilots would not be a reality!

By Alec Larson – May 8, 2017
Flight Training, SunState Aviation

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Aviation Technology | GlobalAir.com | News

Top 5 Reasons YOU Should go to EAA AirVenture This Year

by Tori Williams 2. June 2017 16:21
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I am excited to report that we are officially less than two months away from the start of EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2017! Dubbed “The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration,” AirVenture is hosted annually by the Experimental Aircraft Association near the end of July in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. This year the dates run from July 24th -30th. I have been lucky to be able to attend Oshkosh three times before, including flying in twice.

One thing that has surprised me while studying aviation in college is that very few of my classmates have gone to AirVenture. A few of them had not even heard of it before! I am here to tell you about how AirVenture is a must-do for any aviation enthusiast, and how it can be affordable and fun for anyone – including college students!

(Note for the pilots: Maybe you have been going to Oshkosh for years, but have never tried to fly in. This year you should consider pushing yourself and flying in! It may seem overwhelming at first but the tower and ground personnel are extremely skilled at helping first-timers during their entrance. Read up on the NOTAM and imagine the sense of accomplishment you will when you can proudly say you flew into AirVenture!)

Without further ado, here are my top five reasons you should visit Oshkosh this year.

1. It’s Affordable

One of the biggest reasons my college friends haven’t been to AirVenture is because they think that it is not affordable. Let me tell you, EAA has thought about that. They want as many people as possible to experience the week so they have made ways for even the most frugal people to come. Although the cost of admission and camping out usually add up to less than the cost of one Spring Break trip, EAA also has a whole host of opportunities for visitors to volunteer during the week and get free admission, meals, and even accommodations.

2. It’s a Great Learning Experience

A good aviator never stops learning, and there are thousands of ways you can learn new things while at Oshkosh. Head over to the forums to learn about everything from TIG welding to the complete history of a specific aircraft. Additionally, there are over 800 exhibitors to visit and learn about. The cutting edge of technology is always on display at AirVenture, and attendees will be able to see things they never would have otherwise.

3. It’s Great for Networking

Whether you are a business owner, a college student, a professional pilot, or anything in between, there is going to be someone at AirVenture that you need to meet and talk to. I have made lasting friendships with people I have camped beside, and I have made professional connections with vendors that I can use throughout my whole career. The best part is: you don’t even realize you’re networking! You are all just there to have fun and enjoy the week. It never feels forced or awkward, as some networking events can tend to be.

4.It’s Unlike any Other Event

An “air show” by the classic definition would include unique airplanes doing stunts and wowing the crowd. However, AirVenture is so much more than just an air show. They call it an aviation celebration because there is no better way to describe all that happens. You are able to pick and choose from hundreds of ways to spend your time. If you want a relaxed day at the museum, take a free tram over there and spend the day indoors. If you want an unforgettable airplane ride in a B-17 or Ford Tri-Motor, go ahead and do it! There’s international food, games, and so many ways to customize the week to your desires.

5. It’s FUN

Starting with the opening night concert featuring Barenaked Ladies, AirVenture is determined to have every single attendee have a great time. Air shows featured throughout the day will amaze even the most experienced pilot. At night, the Fly-In Theater is scheduled to play several popular movies, including Sully and Rogue One. Although it can be exhausting trying to see everything you want in one day, it is worth every second and you will leave with unforgettable memories.

What is your favorite part of Oshkosh? Are you attending this year? Let me know in the comments below!

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Flying | Tori Williams | Vintage Aircraft

Are You Fit For Duty?

by Greg Reigel 25. May 2017 13:21
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If you are a flightcrew member for an air carrier operating under 14 C.F.R. Part 121 you know that 14 C.F.R. Part 117 contains flight, duty, and rest regulations that apply to all Part 121 passenger operations. One specific regulation, Section 117.5(d), requires a flightcrew member to “affirmatively state that he or she is fit for duty prior to commencing flight.” Section 117.3 defines “fit for duty” as “physiologically and mentally prepared and capable of performing assigned duties at the highest degree of safety.” What does that mean?

Unfortunately, no objective science-based standard currently exists for measuring fatigue levels. As a result, Section 117.5 doesn’t say just how fatigued a flightcrew member must be in order for him or her to be “unfit for duty.” Rather, the regulation simply states that an individual flightcrew member is “fit for duty” if he or she is capable of safely performing his or her assigned duties. According to the FAA, this determination must be made by each individual flightcrew member based upon a variety of factors, such as the length and difficulty of the flight duty assignment, time of day, and the flightcrew member's self-knowledge of how he or she deals with different levels of fatigue.

Which means flightcrew members’ fit for duty determinations are subjective. But, according to the FAA, this subjectivity “is mitigated by the fact that flightcrew members will undergo fatigue education and awareness training, which will increase each flightcrew member's ability to self-assess his or her fatigue levels.”

So, how does this apply in specific situations? For example, what if the flightcrew member is slightly fatigued at the end of a flight duty period (“FDP”)? Does that mean the flightcrew member should not have accepted the flight assignment? The FAA says “no.” Given the various individual factors that go into a fitness for duty determination, the FAA will not categorically say that a slight amount of fatigue that appears at the end of an FDP would always render a flightcrew member unfit for duty. As long as the flightcrew member is able to affirmatively state at the beginning of the FDP that he or she is fit for duty, then the flightcrew member may accept the assigned flight duty.

What about when the flightcrew member has been awake for 16, 18 or even 24 continuous hours prior to accepting the assigned flight duty? If the flightcrew member certifies that he or she is fit for duty in that situation is that a violation of the regulation? Here again, the FAA says “not necessarily.” Although it is significantly more likely that a person who has been awake for such an extended period of time will not be fit for duty, the regulations do not necessarily preclude the flightcrew member from accepting an assigned flight duty under those circumstances. The flightcrew member must still make an individualized determination and consider, as one factor along with others, the amount of time that the flightcrew member has been continuously awake.

Another common situation arises when an FDP involves more than one flight segment. If the flightcrew member is fit for duty at the beginning of the first flight segment but later determines he or she is not fit for duty before starting a subsequent flight segment during that FDP, then what? Since Section 117.5(d) requires a flightcrew member to reassess whether he or she is fit for duty prior to each flight segment, in that situation the flightcrew member would not be permitted to fly the subsequent flight segment. Similarly, if a flightcrew member reports for an FDP and is fit for duty at that time but that FDP is later extended, the flightcrew member must then reassess whether he or she can continue to serve on the extended FDP.

Thus, in order to be “fit for duty”, flightcrew members must decide, both at the beginning of an FDP and during that FDP that they are mentally and physically prepared and capable of safely performing their assigned duties and then take any necessary steps to comply with the rule. Flightcrew members should use their best judgment to make that determination and then act accordingly.

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Greg Reigel

The End...Maybe

by Lydia Wiff 15. May 2017 09:00
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Spring is here to stay and that means that already the academic year has ended!  You would be surprised how fast nine months really is – especially when you are on the cusp of graduation.  Of course, congratulations to all of the graduates this spring! You should be proud of yourselves and what you have achieved.  This spring marks a momentous occasion for me as I was among those that graduated.

It is hard to believe that in August of 2011 I was starting my higher education journey at a community college in Minnesota only to find myself transferring to the plains of North Dakota.  I certainly did not count on graduating with an Associate’s Degree in Liberal Education, a Bachelor’s of Business Administration in Airport Management, a specialization in Business Aviation, and earning my Certified Member (C.M.) initials through the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE).  Looking back now, it does seem like a lot of schooling.  Let’s not forget my favorite certification which was that of my Private Pilot’s License!

It is also hard to think of how much I managed to fit in since then.  Working at a library, a Fixed Based Operator (FBO), a student magazine, a commercial Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) park, a student magazine, financial aid, and more.  Besides just putting myself through school, I still managed to find time to be involved with the University of North Dakota (UND) AAAE Student Chapter as well as the Women’s Air Race Classic Team.  Of course, writing this blog for the past two years has been a big part of my higher education experience as I have been able to chronicle my studies as well as my experiences.

As graduation has so quickly come and just as quickly left, it means that this is my last post for the academic year (maybe).  When I first took on this position writing for not only myself, but www.Globalair.com, I never thought it would last as long as two years or that I could possibly have that much to write about.  I also never thought I would have so many opportunities to write about so many different topics or interview so many truly inspiring people from the aerospace industry.  While this may be my last post for a little while, be sure to keep checking back, especially my Facebook page (Blue Skies & Tailwinds) where I share photos and links to articles about the aerospace industry.

As for the next step, I’m heading west!  I have accepted a job offer to work for the City of Klamath Falls in Klamath Falls, OR at the Crater Lake-Klamath Regional Airport.  I will work as an Airport Operations Specialist II and do a little of everything including airport inspections, wildlife management, maintenance, and much more.  I’m very excited to a) have a job, and b) work with an airport in a beautiful part of the country.  I know I will learn much and I’m hoping to share a little of my experiences with you all at some point.  However, I’m ready for a little break here!

 

So, thank you all for following me and be sure to check back soon for the next phase of my aerospace story.  Until then, may you always have blue skies and tailwinds!

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Lydia Wiff | UND

High-Wing Vs. Low-Wing Aircraft

by Tori Williams 3. May 2017 17:28
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One of the first things an aspiring pilot learns is that not all aircraft are created equal. At least, not in the eyes of other pilots. It doesn’t take very many conversations with a pilot to find out exactly what type of aircraft they love and hate. Some pilots have good reasons for preferring one type over another, while others just have a soft spot for a certain type they trained in or became infatuated with.

The disagreements cover a variety of aircraft types. Tailwheel verses nose gear, retractable versus fixed gear, G1000 versus the historic six-pack. Each of these has been debated between pilots for years and I’m sure they will continue to be debated. Another popular category is high-wing verses low-wing aircraft. I personally have a preference for high-wing, as the vast majority of my flight time has been in Cessna 172s and a Stinson 10A.

I was curious what the general consensus was on where the best location for the wings is, so I took to the Internet and… Found no clear answer. It seems that there are pros and cons to both configurations, and it almost always boiled down to preference over hard facts. I have compiled a few major things to consider if you are in the scenario where you must choose between a high-wing or low-wing aircraft.

Visibility

Visibility was one of the first things pilots commented on when debating between the two. High-wing aircraft simply give pilot and passengers a better view of the sky around them and ground below them. They are ideal for an introduction flight, cruising around for fun, or flying on missions that require a clear view of the ground. Low-wing aircraft offer outstanding views of the world above the cockpit, but the wings can block anything below.

Accessibility

When fueling on the ground, it is usually much easier to access the tanks on a low-wing aircraft. Most high-wing fuel tanks require standing on a ladder to reach. However, the flip side of this is that it is more difficult to reach the fuel drains and visually inspect the underside of the wing on a low-wing aircraft.

Ground Clearance

Pilots of low-wing aircraft have to be more conscientious of any obstacles on the ground. This includes taxiway lights, tie-downs, and airport signage. The high-wing pilot still has to watch out, but has the ease of knowing their wings are not in such close proximity.

Safety

In the event of an emergency landing, low-wing aircraft have the advantage of being able to absorb some of the crash impact in the wings instead of the fuselage. They also help in the event of a water landing, having the potential to float above the water for a short period of time.

Some pilots love having shade under their wings on a hot summer day. Other pilots prefer being able to set maps or logbooks on the wing during preflight. Some pilots hate having to walk on the wing to get into the aircraft.

At the end of the day, there is no clear winner. It seems that it mostly comes down to personal preference and familiarity with the type of aircraft. Do you prefer high-wing or low-wing? What do you think makes one better than the other? Let me know in the comments below!

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Aircraft Sales | Aviation Safety | Flying | Tori Williams



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