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What Do You Do When The FAA Denies Your Medical Application Because Your Doctor Made The Wrong Diagnosis?

by Greg Reigel 28. November 2017 15:09
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I was recently asked this question by an airman in this very difficult situation. When the airman was younger, the airman was diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. More recently the airman was evaluated by a new doctor who told the airman that, in the doctor’s opinion, the previous diagnosis was wrong and the airman did not, in fact, have bipolar disorder.

Based upon the current doctor’s opinion, the airman applied for a medical certificate. However, despite submitting all of the airman’s medical records, including the earlier bipolar diagnosis as well as the current doctor’s opinion and evaluation, the FAA denied the airman’s application.

So, what are the airman’s options? Well, an airman may appeal the FAA's denial of a medical certificate by filing a petition with the NTSB requesting a hearing before an administrative law judge ("ALJ"). But an airman may only appeal the denial of an unrestricted medical certificate. Since the decision to grant a special issuance is at the discretion of the FAA, the NTSB will not entertain an appeal of the denial of a special issuance.

A hearing is then held at which both the airman and the FAA present evidence through documents and testimony from doctors, medical experts, the FAA and the airman. Oftentimes the airman's treating physician(s), who usually don't have aviation medicine training or experience, will testify that the symptoms and/or condition do not pose a threat to aviation safety and that the airman should be able to fly safely. However, when this type of opinion is presented at the hearing in contradiction to the FAA's expert witnesses, the Board will usually give greater weight to the FAA's expert witnesses based upon the Board’s perception that they have "superior" qualifications in aviation medical standards.

Also, depending upon the condition, an actual diagnosis of a disqualifying medical condition may not be required for the FAA to deny a medical application. Simply presenting with the disqualifying symptoms or condition, or having experienced the symptoms or condition in the past, regardless of whether the airman currently has the symptoms or condition, may be sufficient justification for the FAA to deny the medical certificate.

In order for the ALJ to reverse the FAA's denial, the airman must prove by substantial, reliable and probative evidence that the airman is qualified for the medical certificate for which he or she applied, without limitations. In light of the NTSB's deference to the FAA's medical experts, this can be a very difficult burden to meet. Additionally, an appeal is expensive: Expert medical testimony and attorney fees required for the appeal process can be quite costly.

In this airman's situation, bipolar disorder is a disqualifying condition that prevents the FAA from issuing an unrestricted medical certificate. While the FAA may consider the airman for a special issuance, that decision is solely up to the FAA and may not be appealed. So, the airman would have to fight the FAA's determination that the airman has bipolar disorder.

In order to have the FAA’s denial reversed, the airman has to convince the ALJ. This means the airman would need to have the current doctor testify not only that the airman does not suffer from bipolar disorder, but also that the airman’s current condition, to extent the airman has other disclosed medical conditions, still meets the standards for issuance of an unrestricted medical certificate. It may also be beneficial to have an independent doctor evaluate the airman and provide an opinion that athe airman does not have bipolar disorder.

Additionally, the current doctor would need to explain why the earlier bipolar diagnosis was incorrect. Depending upon the circumstances, this can be a very tough battle for the airman to win.

Unfortunately, at a time when more and more doctors are “diagnosing” kids with ADD, ADHD and other such conditions, this situation is becoming more and more common. And as we have seen, a misdiagnosis as a youth may come back to haunt an adult who wants to become a pilot and needs a medical certificate.

If you find yourself in this situation or have a medical condition that may disqualify you from obtaining a medical certificate, get help BEFORE you apply for a medical certificate. Talk to an aviation attorney or the medical certification professionals at AOPA or NBAA.

By taking a pro-active approach and getting help, you will be able to "pick your battles" wisely to maximize your chances of being able to earn your wings and/or successfully obtaining a medical certificate if necessary.

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Greg Reigel



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