All posts tagged 'AOPA' - Page 3

Fuller To Step Down As AOPA President And CEO

Fuller To Step Down As AOPA President And CEO
Board of Trustees to Conduct National Search for Successor

Frederick, MD -Craig L. Fuller, president and chief executive officer of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the world's largest aviation association, has notified AOPA's Board of Trustees of his intent to step down from his position and from the Board. He plans to remain in his current role until a successor is ready to assume the position. The Board will conduct a national search for his successor. Following the decision to leave AOPA, the succession process was developed by working together, said William C. Trimble III, Chairman of the Board.

Fuller, who took office January 1, 2009 and is only the fourth president of AOPA since the association's founding nearly 75 years ago, will assist with the search for a new president and the transition to a new administration.

In conveying his decision to the Board of Trustees, Fuller, 62, noted that he made a five-year commitment to AOPA when he was appointed president. As he approaches the fulfillment of that commitment, he said he is looking forward to taking on new challenges and opportunities. "I have flown since age 17, and flying has been part of my life ever since. I will always be grateful to the AOPA Board of Trustees for having given me the opportunity to serve the general aviation community and AOPA's 385,000 members in a leadership position," said Fuller. "It has been a privilege to work with my colleagues on a strong set of initiatives that have built on the decades of hard work by AOPA Trustees and members of the management team. With the end of my five-year commitment approaching, this is an appropriate time for me to consider new opportunities and allow the Board time to recruit a successor.

"The process of finding a new leader can now go forward as all of us at AOPA roll up our sleeves to fight the day to day battles that seem to keep coming our way," said Fuller. "The team will not miss a beat this year as we lay the groundwork for the future."

"During his more than four years as president of AOPA, Craig served nobly and professionally. He has advocated strongly on behalf of the general aviation community in Washington, built bridges with the other aviation associations, improved member communications and generated promising ideas for tomorrow," said Trimble. "We recognize the importance of finding a leader who can continue to inspire all of us in these challenging times. We are focused on finding a leader who shares our vision and convictions as well as the talent and capabilities necessary to achieve our goals."

Trimble, who has chaired the AOPA Board of Trustees since 2005, said the Board will form a search committee shortly and retain an executive search firm to begin looking for AOPA's new leader.

Since 1939, AOPA has protected the freedom to fly for thousands of aviators and aircraft owners. From its headquarters in Frederick Md., offices in Washington, D.C. and seven regions of the U.S., its representatives interact with local, state and federal elected officials and government representatives to ensure the safe and steady growth of general aviation. AOPA offers members a variety services, including flight planning products, safety seminars and studies and publications, as well as insurance, legal, aircraft financing and title services.

###

Contact:

Katie Pribyl

301-695-2150
[email protected]

FMI: www.avweb.com
Visit: www.aopa.org

Watch the AOPA Summit live online

The AOPA is streaming live its annual summit, being held this week in Long Beach, Calif. Events today included Cessna CEO Jack Pelton speaking, as well as John and Martha King receiving a safety award from the association.

If the embedding worked properly, you can watch live coverage from the event at the top of this post, or you can head over to the AOPA web site, where you can also join a live discussion via your Facebook account.

Other highlights include forums on IFR challenges and aircraft ownership, in addition to static displays and an exhibit hall.   

The Lindbergh Foundation hosts a summit event Friday at 10 a.m. entitled, “Aviation, the Environment & the Future.”

Also, the Summit has a Twitter account here that is posting updates.

A new Cessna turboprop? Cessna E350?

The rumor mill churned at last week’s NBAA Annual Meeting & Convention in Atlanta, Ga., that Cessna Aircraft Co., may have something up its sleeve in addition to the Citation Ten it unveiled there.

In the video above, AOPA Pilot interviews Cessna CEO Jack Pelton and he hints that the aircraft maker might be developing a single-turboprop model to be marketed as an option in between the Corvalis TT and Citation Mustang.

“(It) would ideally have a cruise speed greater than 300 knots,” Pelton says in the interview. “And a price point between $1 and $2.2 million. We want to be south of the Mustang in terms of price.”

[more]

Russ Niles writes for AvWeb this week that such an aircraft could compete with the Piper Meridian and Socata TBM 850, as Corvalis and Cirrus Aircraft pilots look to train up for an increase of range and speed.

Pelton has said he wants the Cessna product line to be ready to absorb new buyers as the economy rights itself. He told AOPA Pilot that he would like for a new product to be rolled out at the AOPA Aviation Summit next month in Long Beach, Calif. However, such an announcement may be “too soon,” he said.

An N-number has surfaced among aviation sleuths, N350CE, that shows up in our aircraft registration tool as a single turboprop two-seater registered to Cessna. It is listed there as a Cessna E350.

UPDATE: AvWeb now has what it says are images of the Cessna turboprop. Check them out here

AOPA begins 'special report' on avgas transition

In what the organization called a special report, the AOPA released a series of stories this week on the future of 100LL.

Several stories in a newsletter distributed by the pilots’ association discuss several aspects that anchor the debate of any transition, one that in all likelihood is a matter of when rather than if.

Articles cover subjects such as the role of federal agencies, such as the EPA and FAA in a transition, what steps may need to be taken to convert aircraft, how 30 percent of the GA fleet consumes 70 percent of the 100LL stock for anti-knock protection and a Q&A session.

AOPA President Craig Fuller also weighs in with a statement to group members, saying a “SWAT team” of communications and government-relations specialists from the organization have stepped to the plate as the nation discussion over removing lead from avgas has become more active. [more]

“AOPA has focused on representing the interest of all our members in regulatory proceedings  and keeping you informed,” Fuller wrote.

Here concludes that several principles dominate the landscape of 100LL’s transition. They are:

-       100LL will remain readily available, but there is currently no clear “drop-in” replacement for 100LL;

-       An industry avgas coalition has organized around a Future Avgas Strategy and Transition Plan—that is committed to a process and path that will address the needs of the entire GA fleet;

-       This process toward a single-fuel solution that assures safe operations, meets infrastructure concerns, and affordable economics will take many years.

Register for the “Getting the Lead Out’ Newsletter at this link.

View the Sept. 7 edition the AOPA mailed out by clicking here.

AOPA Online: GA coalition submits first round of avgas comments to EPA

ELTs on 121.5 MHz could be banned by FCC

 

The FCC last week issued a report that would ban emergency locator transmitters that operate at 121.5 MHz, in a decision that could affect thousands of GA aircraft.

The abolition of the devices, approved by the FAA, would take place in August.

The FCC said if the 121.5 ELTs were not available, aircraft operators will migrate to 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs monitored by satellite. The assumptive posture is that satellite monitoring would make the devices more effective in search and rescue.

The AOPA spoke out against the decision yesterday, calling it costly and unnecessary.

“The FCC is making a regulatory change that would impose an extra cost on GA operators, without properly communicating with the industry or understanding the implications of its action,” said Rob Hackman, AOPA Vice President of Regulatory Affairs.  

Sound off below and let us know how this regulatory decision could affect you and whether or not you think it's the right move.

End of content

No more pages to load