All posts tagged 'Aerodynamics'

Preparing for Spin Training

Well well well.....the time has come for me and I am so excited. Almost immediately after I got my multi rating I started on CFI training, and so far it's been an absolute blast. A lot of work but such a fun adventure. And what does every CFI applicant have to do as part of their curriculum?

You guessed it....spin training.

I won't lie, I'm actually pretty nervous about it. The thought of spiraling towards the ground isn't necessarily a settling thought. 

But, I want to be prepared so I can have a good experience. Studying procedures to break out of a spin and understanding what induced a spin in the first place is a good place to start. So, if you're like me and soon to do spin training (or know you will have to in the future), let's discuss a few things.

First, what IS a spin exactly?

Well, you just need two magical ingredients to induce a spin. A stall, and lack of coordination in the plane. Kind of scary to think that's all it takes!

So visual you're teaching a student a power-on stall (I find this one is hardest to keep coordinated). You have full throttle and a high pitch-up attitude. The stall is induced and you look over to realize the ball is wayyyy out of the center of the turn coordinator. You don't recover from the buffet fast enough and with the ball still out of center, you can literally feel the plane wanting to start its roll (this is actually how it would happen). This is because one of the wings stalled first, and so it dropped. What keeps the spin rotating is one of the wings regaining lift while the other (the dropped wing) remains stalled. So what do you do next (besides scream if we're being honest)?

PARE PARE PARE PARE PARE PARE PARE PARE PARE

Did I mention this acronym called PARE?

PARE is what's going to save your life and break the spin so you can recover. Here's what it stands for:

Power idle

Ailerons neutral

Rudder full opposite the direction of the turn

Elevator down (briskly push that yoke forward)

I'll be writing a blog post after I complete my spin training more in depth on these concepts, so we'll discuss then WHY exactly these procedures exist and how they break the spin.

I've been taught PARE since the beginning of my private training and have never actually performed it, so next week will be interesting. But every time someone even mentions a spin, my mind is screaming PARE.

Pictured below is the plane I'll be performing mine in, so I'll also be working to get that tailwheel endorsement signed off!

My flight school, which is Harvey-Rihn out of T41, uses this Decathlon for all their CFI students spin training. 

Need help finding a flight school to do yours out of? Or maybe you're just wanting anything from recurrent training to a new license? Use our Flight School Directory to find a flight school near you. This directory is kept up-to-date and is NOT just for finding schools within the USA, there's other countries on that list as well. 

Anyone have any good spin training stories or tips for flying? Share below in the comments!! We'd love to hear. Stay tuned for the next post on how it goes. 

Cessna-Gulfstream Speed Duel Could Hit Mach 0.95 Limit

Article By: Chad Trautvetter
www.ainonline.com

The transonic speed spat between Cessna’s Citation Ten and Gulfstream’s G650 is likely to hit the stops at Mach 0.95 when it encounters not “the sound barrier” but required safety margins. With the Ten’s top speed now pegged at Mach 0.935, Gulfstream’s G650 could thus leapfrog the Ten only slightly, if the Savannah-based aircraft manufacturer even chooses to do so.

According to the FAA, “FAR 25.335(b)(2) requires at least Mach 0.07 [40 knots at 40,000 feet] difference between the design cruise Mach and the dive Mach,” where the design cruise Mach is effectively the Mmo. This provides a safety margin for upsets and gusts, the FAA said, though it can be reduced “to as little as Mach 0.05, if supported by analysis.” In practice, some applicants have been able to reduce the difference to about Mach 0.06 (34.4 knots), an FAA spokeswoman said.

The Ten’s predecessor, the Citation X, exceeded Mach 1.0 in dive testing, a knowledgeable source told AIN, so it would be possible for the Ten’s Mmo to reach Mach 0.95 if Cessna can get the maximum margin reduction. Meanwhile, the G650 reached a reported dive speed of Mach 0.995, so its maximum permissible limit (without further dive testing) would be Mach 0.945.

But the sub-Mach 1.0 speed crown might be a moot point–the Ten can fly a 2,500-nm trip at high-speed cruise in 5 hours 10 minutes, while under the same conditions the G650 can do it nine minutes more quickly, according to data from the respective manufacturers.

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