All posts tagged 'Air shows'

Oshkosh: It's Not About the Airplanes


Okay, so maybe it's a little bit about the airplanes. (Did you see the Mosquito? The GoodYear Blimp?!) But for most people, Oshkosh is about so much more than airplanes. If you follow Oshkosh on social media then you've heard the buzz of engines during the airshow and you've seen your friends posting selfies in front of amazing airplanes. But what you can't see from the photos is something else that's deeper, more elusive, that only exists at Oshkosh. Maybe it's a feeling, or maybe it's just something in the air. It's probably different for everyone, but whatever it is, it's general aviation at its absolute best. Airplanes are just the backdrop. A friend (who I happened to meet at Oshkosh) said it best in this video when he said, "It feels like coming home."

So what is it that makes Oshkosh special? What is it that keeps thousands of aviation fanatics returning each year to a place that's not even easy to get to? It's about the people, the encouragement, the mentorship, the conversation and the camaraderie. It's about an industry that welcomes you into it without pause and allows you to consider it your home without even a hint of reservation. It's an immediate family where every single one of your sisters and brothers just "gets" you.

Over fifteen years ago, I entered the world of aviation by walking into a sleepy airport terminal in my hometown, completely on my own. I had been on a single plane ride before, and I knew I wanted to fly. There was just one problem: I didn't know how. I didn't have a mentor. I didn't have a family member to show me the ropes. I didn't know anyone in aviation. I didn't know where to go or what it would take to become a pilot.

I remember walking into that terminal, a nervous teenage girl, to ask about flight lessons. With a comforting smile and a gleam in his eye, the airport manager sent me across the field to the sleepy little flight school. The owner of the flight school, without asking me why a girl like me would possibly want to fly, without hesitating or commenting on my five-foot-nothing height, hired me on the spot as a secretary. I could answer the phones, he said, and he'd pay me six dollars per hour and let me sit in on the ground school for free. "It's a deal," I said.

What I didn't realize was that this deal would go far beyond six dollars per hour and free ground school. I didn't realize I was gaining an instant family. The flight instructors took me seriously, treated me with respect, and introduced me to the world of flying with enthusiasm and encouragement. Beyond that, each one of them shared their worlds with me outside of our flight lessons. They told me about air shows and scholarships and what airline life would be like. They taught me about the bigger, Part 135 aircraft they flew during their off time. On their days off, they came to the airport with their wives and kids. It felt like home.

Fast forward a few years, and I made another solo trek, this time to EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. I'd heard the stories, but wondered how it could be more than just another air show with expensive food. I'd seen enough air shows. I'd seen Tora! Tora! Tora! and P-51s and Sean Tucker and Kirby Chambliss. What would be different about AirVenture? I had to find out. I showed up at my room that year - a small bedroom in a lady's house that I booked on a referral from a journalist friend - and found a group of people who had been coming to Oshkosh for years together. But instead of sticking to their own group, they immediately took me in, inviting me to ride the bus with them and inviting me to their nightly dinners. And then I showed up to the media tent, once again by myself, and immediately found friendly faces there, too. I walked the grounds, and while running into old friends, I made even more new friends. One introduction led to another and before I knew it, I had new aviation family members all over the place. It felt like a family reunion - with a pretty spectacular air show on the side.

Last year, I made a few friends at Camp Scholler who have been camping together as a group for years. This year, I was invited to camp alongside them at what they lovingly refer to as "Camp Bacon." I showed up with my kids, but otherwise alone, without really knowing any of these folks beyond social media. As if on cue, they welcomed me - and my children - into their aviation family immediately. They offered good conversation, interesting aviation stories, hot coffee, and even wine. They invited me to the nightly campfire, and to join them during their yearly "Dawn Patrol" walk to the warbirds at five a.m. They shared their stories with me and I learned about their aviation work. By the end of the trip, there were hugs, with the sound of P-51 Merlin engines in the background. It felt like coming home.

This is my family.

This is Oshkosh.

Top 9 Things to do at AirVenture in 2015

  1. Test your drone flying skills with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's Small Unmanned Aerospace System (sUAS) Challenge. The drone challenge will feature a 30-foot drone cage at Aviation Gateway Park, and will include both obstacle and speed courses designed for unmanned aerial vehicles. The competition will be held daily from 3 to 5 p.m. and is open to anyone age 10 and up. Or, for those who intend to bring a drone with them, a field next to Pioneer Airport will be designated for drone use. Small RC model aircraft (less than five pounds) may be used in the designated area from 7 to 9 p.m. every night.
  2. Visit the widely praised EAA AirVenture Museum to see more than 200 historic aircraft that are available for viewing. From the classic Piper Cub to the Spirit of St. Louis, EAA's AirVenture Museum has all of the best airplanes. From the museum, you can take a ride in a 1929 Ford Tri-Motor or a 1929 Travel Air E-4000. The museum also has four theaters and a special hands-on KidVenture area, and from May to October, you can take a short tram ride to Pioneer Airport and walk back in time through seven hangars that explore the 20s and 30s, aviation's Golden Age.
  3. Take your kids to Pioneer Airport, which is the place to be this year. From airplane and helicopter rides to drone flying to KidVenture, Pioneer Airport mixes old with new by introducing the next generation of aviation buffs to the aviation world in a variety of ways. Kids can complete a Future A&P course by visiting various booths and learning how to accomplish maintenance tasks like riveting or prop shaping. At the Young Eagles flight education area, future pilots can learn about airspace, lift and fly a flight simulator. Pedal planes are available for the youngest pilots, and older ones will enjoy a bit of history walking through the AirVenture Museum hangars.
  4. Watch the Valdez STOL aircraft show each other up. Each May, specially modified short takeoff and land (STOL) aircraft compete in a competition in Valdez, Alaska. More than a dozen of them will be at Oshkosh this year, and the competition is not to be missed. You can find them at the afternoon air shows, at the ultralight air strip and a final competition will happen prior to the night air show.
  5. If low-key is more your style, visit the Oshkosh Seaplane Base located at Lake Winnebago. Buses run from AirVenture to the Seaplane Base regularly, and beyond the weekly Watermelon Social event, it's a quiet respite from the crowds and heat.
  6. Celebrate the great moments of World War II. This is the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, the successful air war to defend England in the summer and autumn of 1940, forestall a planned invasion of the island by Germany, and the first major turning point of the war. This is the moment that Winston Churchill famously predicted, should it be successful, would be known as England’s "finest hour." Airshow themes celebrating this turning point in the European war throughout the week will include many of the 300 warbirds expected to attend Oshkosh, including a rare flying example of the de Havilland Mosquito fighter/bomber.
  7. Take a seat in a classic aircraft. In addition to the Ford Tri-Motor making its accustomed flights above the AirVenture Grounds, this year you can take a ride from nearby Appleton in the B-17 Flying Fortress Aluminum Overcast, one of the rare surviving examples of this heavy bomber that dropped more ordnance than any other Allied Bomber of World War II. The flights depart from nearby Appleton and a shuttle bus will depart the AirVenture grounds an hour before the flight.
  8. Join Burt Rutan for a week-long recognition of the 40th anniversary of his iconic early aircraft design, the VariEze. For four decades Burt Rutan has continuously broken the mold, creating one unusual aircraft design after another and popularizing concepts such as canard wings and composite construction, culminating for many with his design of SpaceShipOne, the first commercial space flight vehicle. Rutan will be at Oshkosh to share this celebration of his unparalleled history of innovation. His designs will be included in the Homebuilts in Review each morning at 10 and Rutan will be interviewed following at 1PM.
  9. Stop by the Globalair.com booth! Have we met before? Stop by and meet your hard-working GlobalAir team! We'll be in Hangar D, Booth 4028.

10 Things to Do at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

Headed to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh this year? Here's a rundown of some of the must-see aircraft and events!

  1. View the action on the Ultralight Runway. At the south end of the airport, you can sit back and relax while watching powered parachutes, powered gliders, light sport aircraft and other ultralights fly around each morning and night. You'll also see hot air balloons and home-built rotorcraft.
  2. Help build the One Week Wonder airplane and sign the logbook as a builder. The aircraft, a Zenith CH 750, is a kit plane that Oshkosh staff hopes will showcase how a plane can be built easily and affordably. The aircraft will be built over the course of seven days at EAA AirVenture 2014.
  3. Watch the Rockwell Collins Night Air Show and fireworks display. This one's a no-brainer. Who would want to miss performances from some of the best air show performers in the world, especially when pyrotechnics are involved? There's an impressive fireworks display at the end of each night air show.
  4. Take an EAA Selfie and post it to Twitter using the official AirVenture selfie hashtag, #EAASelfie. And don't forget to tag us @GlobalAir!
  5. Visit the Fly Market for the latest and greatest aviation accessories, gadgets and technology! This is a great place to pick up those flight supplies you've been wanting, grab some swag, and enter to win drawings at the booths of various aviation companies.
  6. Tip your hat to veterans after the Old Glory Honor Flight returns. After the air show on August 1st, a group of veterans will return from visiting memorials in Washington, D.C. on a Boeing 737. This is your chance to stand among thousands of others and salute them as they return "home" - a welcome home party they deserve!
  7. Dust off your flight bag at the "Rusty Pilot" seminar. Don't we all need a refresher? If you haven't flown in a while, chances are good that you'll be inspired to get back in the air while you're at Oshkosh. Naturally, one of your first stops should be the AOPA Rusty Pilot Seminar. It's the perfect way to brush up on your skills, including a rundown of what you've missed and what's changed within the past few years that you've been away. Bonus: Breakfast will be provided!
  8. Learn how to pass your checkride… or how to build an airplane…or how to buy an airplane…or how to build a hangar…or how to lean an engine….or how to take better pictures… you get the picture!
  9. Try your hand at "flying" the F-35 simulator/cockpit display. F-35 instructors will be on hand to demonstrate the abilities of the newest fighter jet with the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Cockpit Display.
  10. Stop by the Globalair.com booth! Have we met before? Stop by and meet your hard-working GlobalAir team! We'll be in Hangar D, Booth 4028.

What are you looking forward to most at Oshkosh this year? Let us know in the comments!

Lavelle breaks sport class speed record at Reno; Glasair celebrates

Jeff Lavelle upped the ante this year at the Reno Air Races, setting a new Sport Class qualifying record at 362.481 mph in a Glasair III.

Glasair celebrated the feat this week in an announcement, including the release of the above photo.

The statement noted that the Lavelle achieved a faster speed than any of the burlier aircraft in the Super Sport Class. It also outpaced 14 of 24 entrants in the Unlimited Class, which included P-51 Mustangs, a Fockewulf, a P40 and an F4U Corsair. 

Following the qualifying record, Lavelle went on to capture first place in each heat of the Sport Class races, including the Sport Class Gold race.

"I’m proud to be a part of putting Glasair back in the winner’s circle – and I had a lot of fun doing it,” the pilot said in the statement.

[more]

This marks the second year that a Glasair broke the class speed record. 

Lavelle’s Glasair III is a factory stock airframe powered by a twin turbocharged Lycoming TIO-540 engine developed by Grant Semanskee of Snohomish, Wash.

Last month, during the Reno Air Races, we also linked to a post highlighting former astronaut Curt Brown setting a speed record of 543.568 mph in an L-29. Read more about his feat here.

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