All posts tagged 'Aircraft'

3 Planes to Add to Your Christmas List

1) Cessna 182 on Floats

Seaplane ratings are one of the least sought after ratings by pilots. They're usually not needed to pursue most professional careers, so if people don't need to spend money on them, they just don't!

They're most popular in places like Florida and Alaska where the landscape is better suited for the aircraft type.

Some of the most fun planes to fly on the water are a Cessna 182 or a Piper Super Cub on Floats.

Even cooler is the Icon, specifically the A5 model. There are lots of different planes that are fun to fly on the water, but my favorite has to be the Piper Super Cub of these 3 listed.  

2) Cirrus SR22

I'm quoting one of my country coworkers when I say this (so read it in a southern accent): the SR22 is the 'cat's meow' of general aviation. It truly cannot get any better than this. Cirrus set out to design something highly aerodynamic that, while even being a high weight, has a long glide range and fast TAS. 

Cirrus are high-quality aircraft. Usually, they come with a hefty price tag, but they're worth every penny. 

Butterfly doors, a certified parachute, and spring-loaded controls as its own rudder gust lock system give it unique qualities. But the best thing is it's just an easy plane to fly. While being a sleek plane, the checklists are still simple and operating procedures are easy to understand -- there's nothing in the systems that's entirely different from something like a C172. You might have to learn FADEC or adjust to flying a constant-speed prop without having a manifold pressure lever, but most pilots get the hang of things in 2-3 flights. 

3) Diamond DA 62

Well, do I need to say anything after you look at this picture? The DA 62 is without a doubt my favorite multi-engine general aviation type aircraft. 

This is like the SR22: easy to fly, has great maneuverability, and is again the "cat's meow" of flying! While the cirrus is easily a favorite single-engine piston type plane, this is the gold medalist of the multi-engine world (outside of turbojets). For those shopping for a plane that has good economic fuel burn but also has good speed to make it to different destinations across the states within a day: THIS.IS.IT.

I can't say it enough, you don't want to miss out on flying this plane! A single flight in these makes a multi-engine ticket worth it.

Any other ideas on planes to ask Santa for this year? There are always lots of fun aircraft to fly that are easily forgotten or not flown as much but are still such a blast. 

Stay tuned and let us know what you guys get for Christmas! It's always fun to see what pilots around the world get as gifts; unique people make for unique presents.

Closing Aircraft Purchase/Sale Transactions

 

Aircraft Purchase/Sale Transactions

As we get to the end of the year, many aircraft purchasers and sellers are trying to get their deals closed. Whether for tax or other reasons, year end is a busy time for aircraft transactions. Many transactions are closed using escrow agents located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (home of the FAA Aircraft Registry). If you have never been involved in an aircraft transaction, you may wonder what happens at an aircraft closing.

In a typical (if such a thing exists) aircraft closing, here are the steps an escrow agent takes to help aircraft sellers and purchasers close a transaction once all of the necessary funds and documents are in escrow:

  • The escrow agent will pay off any liens, mortgages, security interests or other interests held by third parties against the aircraft ("Liens");

  • The escrow agent will disburse to the seller the purchase price, plus any unpaid amounts due from purchaser to seller for flight costs associated with moving the aircraft to the inspection facility or the delivery location, and less one-half of the escrow agent's fee;

  • Once the seller confirms receipt of the funds, the escrow agent (a) dates and files with the FAA releases of any Liens the FAA Aircraft Bill of Sale (FAA Form 8050-2), the Aircraft Registration Application (FAA Form 8050-1) and statement in support (for example, if the purchaser is a limited liability company); and (b) dates and releases the Warranty Bill of Sale and Assignment of Warranties and Other Rights (if applicable) out of escrow to purchaser;

  • Purchaser executes and delivers the delivery receipt to the seller which confirms the aircraft is in the delivery condition and is accepted by the purchaser;

  • If the aircraft is subject to the Capetown Convention, the escrow agent, as purchaser’s professional user entity, registers the sale of the aircraft to the purchaser with the International Registry; and

  • The escrow agent, as the seller’s professional user entity, discharges any registration by seller with the International Registry of any international interest or prospective international interest registered with respect to the aircraft, and consents to the registration of the sale of the aircraft to the purchaser.

The seller and purchaser usually intend that each of these actions is interdependent with each of the others, but that upon completion they are considered to have occurred simultaneously. When all of these steps are completed, the seller delivers physical possession of the aircraft to the purchaser at the closing location.

This closing process may occur via a telephone call with all of the interested parties on the line, or simply after each of the interested parties has provided authorization (usually via e-mail) for the escrow agent to perform these steps and close the transaction. And, of course, depending upon the transaction, these steps may vary. But this is generally how the process occurs.

If you ever have questions or need assistance with an aircraft transaction or closing, I would be happy to help. And in the meantime, Happy New Year.

Greg can be reached at:

Greg Reigel
Shackelford, Bowen, McKinley & Norton, LLP
9201 N. Central Expressway, 4th Floor, Dallas, Texas 75231
Direct: (214) 780-1482 - Fax: (214) 780-1401
E-mail:  [email protected]
Website:  www.shackelford.law

Retail Owners: BUY, SELL or HOLD?

As an inventorying-dealer, we are often asked by aircraft owners “Does it pay to make a move now?

The truth is, whenever you buy or sell an asset, there are unavoidable costs associated. Selling a home can be one of the best examples of an expensive transaction with often little monetary value gain. Moving costs, furniture damage, endless time spent cleaning/showing the home, agent commissions often eat up your anticipated fortune. 


An aircraft transaction however, has an overwhelming amount of justified reasons to invest. Whether for business or for personal use, aircraft as we all know are time machines which can also bring value to an owner’s employees, their families, the employee morale at a distant store or a face-to-face meeting with a vendor about an issue.  I would even argue the efficiencies a properly advised owner can create during a transaction can make for large gains in monetary value at times. No, I’m not suggesting you go buy a Falcon 10 and wait for the market to rise, however there ARE opportunities in this current active market, to make smart financial gains in your aviation transaction both for the short-term & long.


Whether it means you are a new private pilot moving up from your first 172 to a faster Cirrus, or whether you are a large corporation looking to sell your Citation XL and get into a large-cabin Falcon, I believe this is a good time to move! With pre-owned aircraft inventories shrinking daily & firming prices, we are already at pre-2008 inventory levels again and first-time buyers are entering the market which we haven’t seen in a decade. Only a couple years ago, we would commonly advise clients the selling would be the tough part, but the buying is easy. Now that is almost opposite in some late-model jet markets where buyers are waiting patiently for months at asking price while the seller tries to locate their new aircraft.


What should you do? Get the advice of a trusted and seasoned professional. If you aren’t already working with a broker or dealer, I recommend starting your search for one at National Aircraft Resale Association From there you’ll have the freedom to rely on your broker’s market intel, along with your good business sense which likely allowed for you to buy an aircraft in the first place. Good hunting and God Bless.


Chris is the Vice President of Meisner Aircraft who has served companies both small and large for over 30 years.  They have built their reputation of providing good sound business advice for clients around the world.  Whether it was a customer purchasing their first single engine aircraft or the larger flight department who needed a company with the experience and expertise to handle a complicated transaction process.  Family owned and operated they have successfully been involved in over $900 million in aircraft sales.  

The Importance of Accident Investigation

This semester I am taking a class that is required for my major called "Aviation Safety Programs." I did not know much about this class before the first day, besides that we would be learning how to be safer and more cautious pilots in our flight operations. Now that the first week of classes has come and gone, I am looking forward to this class more than most of my others. The basic setup of this class is that we will be reading and watching videos about aircraft accidents and analyzing what went wrong. We then write 250-500 words a week about a factor of the accident that stuck out to us. A large percentage of our final grade is calculated from a presentation that we each give about an accident that is randomly assigned to us.

This may sound grim, but it is so important to sit down and work through exactly what caused a deadly accident to happen so that you can avoid the same mistakes in the future. Whether it is pilot error, instrument malfunction, or an accident caused by ATC, knowing how to understand and avoid the same fate is paramount to creating safer skies.

For example, the first accident that we investigated was Colgan Air flight 3407. As 40+ aviation students anxiously watched the projector screen, we were shown a video that recreated the accident with a 3D model of the aircraft and instruments visualizing what the black box had recorded. Additionally, this video had real audio from ATC communicating with the copilot shortly before the accident. It was disturbing to hear, as it made the accident seem so much more real.

After watching the video, we opened discussion to what we believed went wrong. Was it icing? Was it the captain who had previously failed stall awareness training? Was it the first officer who had been working so much between flying and being a waitress that she was deliriously tired? It is important to consider all of these factors and logically work through why this was a bad decision/scenario. We then read the NTSB report and discussed how they came to their conclusions.

This is the infamous accident that lead to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee introducing the "Airline Safety and Pilot Training Improvement Act of 2009." Many things changed in the world of professional aviation after this law was passed. Regulations governing pilot training became much more strict. Additionally, the hour requirements for a pilot to earn their ATP rating changed from 250 to 1500. Although both pilots had several thousands of hours of training, the distraught families of the victims who pushed for these updates to regulations simply wanted to try and ensure something like this never happened again.

As you can see, the aftermath of this accident was colossal. It had a huge impact on the aviation industry as a whole, the effects of which aviation students will witness firsthand for years to come. Had the NTSB reported that the cause of the accident was icing with minimal other factors, perhaps the outcome would have been different. However, we cannot be sure of this. The important thing to gather from this is that the entire accident could have been avoided if the pilots had stopped the sequence of bad events from early on.

The "Decide" model is often used to evaluate in-flight emergencies. Having a prior knowledge of events that have lead to accidents can assist with logical thinking when evaluating impeding danger.

Each accident starts as a chain of events. Imagine dominos in a line. When you knock down one, others start following after quite quickly. One of the things we will be doing in my class is identifying which moments leading up to the accidents are dominos. We will analyze where it starts, what makes it worse, and what the ultimate result is. I think that this is fascinating, and it is extremely important for all pilots to examine aircraft accident reports to become better informed and prepared in case they recognize something that could be a domino.

I want to encourage every pilot out there, whether it is their profession or they fly for fun, to begin paying attention to accident reports. It can be difficult, as most pilots have an "it won’t happen to me," attitude, but doing so will help make flying safer for yourself and everyone around you.

Help Build the "One Week Wonder" at Airventure!

At the Zenith Builders in September, Charlie Becker (Director of Communities & Homebuilt Community Manager) spoke about the return of the One Week Wonder! project to AirVenture (Oshkosh) next year. Photo © Sabastien Heintz

EAA’s unique building project is focused on building a Zenith CH 750 kit aircraft during the seven days of EAA AirVenture 2014, beginning on July 28 and continuing through completion or the event’s final day on August 3. The goal is to completely construct, inspect, and taxi test the aircraft by the end of the weeklong event.

"We want people to discover that building an airplane is not that complicated and is within the reach of just about anyone, by watching this project take shape during the week and participating in it themselves," said Charlie Becker, EAA’s manager of the organization’s homebuilt programs. "This Zenith kit will arrive at Oshkosh just as any builder would receive it. The One Week Wonder will show how today’s advanced kits and technology make aircraft building accessible and affordable, especially with the support from many EAA programs and members. It’s a fun, interactive opportunity that will show thousands of people exactly how an airplane goes together."

The One Week Wonder project will also allow EAA to showcase how a person can build their own airplane, the technical achievements along the way, and EAA support programs for aircraft builders. AirVenture attendees will be able to add their own "hands-on" moment in the construction project and sign the logbook as one of the builders.

In the One Week Wonder display area, which will be located near the EAA Welcome Center in the main crossroads of the AirVenture grounds, other displays will include the completed Zenith CH 750 built by EAA employees – including many who had never built an airplane previously. There will also be interactive displays that highlight the aircraft construction process, the variety of aircraft available for builders, and information on getting started on an aircraft project.

More details about the One Week Wonder project will be announced as they are finalized. You can also learn more about building Zeniths at Sabastien Heintz’s blog << Older posts Newer posts >>

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