All posts tagged 'Aircraft' - Page 13

What’s Next for NASA? 10 Wild Newly Funded Projects

Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing
Article By: Keith Wagstaff
Brought to you by: www.techland.time.com

If you live near an airport, you’re probably glad that supersonic commercial jets aren’t the norm. The problem is that what’s aerodynamic for subsonic flight isn’t necessarily aerodynamic for supersonic flight, which is why you end up with such loud sonic booms. Gecheng Zha of the University of Miami found a potential solution: create a subsonic aircraft that can rotate 90 degrees during flight to turn into a supersonic one, ensuring that it’s always as quiet and efficient as possible.



Click Here to view the remaining 9 newly funded projects for NASA.

Boeing 787 Engine Failure Sparks Fire at Charleston Airport

Article by: Gregory Polek
Brought to you by: AINONLINE

Another Boeing 787 engine problem—this time involving a General Electric GEnx turbofan in an airplane destined for Air India—sparked a grass fire at Charleston International Airport during a pre-flight test on Saturday, forcing the airport to close its main runway for more than an hour. The contained engine failure has prompted an investigation by the NTSB, Boeing and GE, maker of the engine now in service with Japan Airlines on four 787s.

Evidence so far points to a failure in the “back end” of the engine, specifically in the area of the low-pressure turbine. “GE Aviation continues to work with the NTSB and Boeing to determine the cause of Saturday’s incident during a ground-test run in Charleston on a newly built 787,” said the engine company in a statement sent to AIN. “GE is working aggressively to move the engine involved in the incident to a GE facility for an investigative tear-down.”

The incident involved the second of three 787s that have rolled off Boeing’s new assembly line in Charleston, South Carolina. It came roughly a week after Japan’s All Nippon Airways had to ground its five Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-powered 787s following the manufacturer’s discovery of corrosion in a crown gear within an external gearbox during product development testing.

ANA has since returned four of its five airplanes to service, and plans to redeploy the fifth early this week.

Sierra Industries receives Mexican government DGAC approval for aircraft inspections, service and modifications


UVALDE, TX – April 20, 2012 – Joining a select group of approved aircraft service centers in the United States, Sierra Industries has been certified by the Mexican government aviation agency to service Mexican-registered aircraft. The Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC) presented certificate no. CO-038/12 to Sierra Industries representatives on April 4, permitting the company to inspect, repair and modify a wide variety of aircraft from piston singles to cabin-class business jets.

In May, the Mexican government is expected to issue a ruling restricting maintenance services for Mexican-registered aircraft to facilities located within Mexico, with the exception of a limited number of DGAC-certified facilities outside the country’s borders. Located some 50 miles from the Mexico-Texas border and less than 250 miles from Monterrey, Sierra’s Uvalde facility is ideally positioned to allow convenient access to Mexican-based aircraft.

Enjoying nearly 30 years of aircraft service and modification experience, Sierra Industries’ location at Uvalde’s Garner Field Airport offers true “one-stop shop” capabilities including PMA parts manufacturing. in-house avionics support and on-field paint and interior specialists. Numerous Sierra employees are bilingual in Spanish and English, helping to facilitate communications with south-of-the-border aircraft owners and operators.

A number of Mexican-registered aircraft already enjoy one or more of Sierra’s well-known Citation performance modifications, such as FJ44 re-engining and Eagle/Longwing airframe upgrades. The DGAC certification ensures that those owners can continue to utilize Sierra’s expert service for their upgraded aircraft and new modification clients can count on after-the-sale support without undue regulatory restrictions.

For more information, please contact me at your convenience.

   Jim Gerrish
   Manager of Creative Marketing
   Sierra Industries, Ltd.
   830-278-4481 ext. 226

Crop dusting - not for the faint of heart

Crop Dusting
J.D. Scarborough, a crop duster for 41 years, says that
although the profession is not as dangerous as it used to be,
he sometimes wonders why some of those he’s known have
been killed rather than him.
Story by: By Jim West
Albanyhearld.com




DAWSON -- American agriculture took a positive turn in August, 1921, when Lt. John A Macready sailed over an Ohio catalpa grove to dump a load of powdered lead arsenate on invading Catalpa Sphinx Moths.

By the end of his six-acre journey, Macready had become the world's first crop duster -- sometime know in modern times as aerial applicators. Among the early followers in this pioneer's dust trail would be a company called the Delta Dusters in Louisiana, later to become Delta Airlines.
The profession has come a long way since the early days of flight, as evidenced by larger, more powerful and efficient aircraft and computerized delivery systems. Despite the technical advancements, though, the planes continue to be flown by human pilots.

If you think you may be interested in a career as an aerial applicator look for a thrill park featuring rides imposing up to six intermittent "G's," or multiples of your own weight. There should be alternating short runs across uncertain terrain, eight to ten feet from the ground at speeds of 150 miles per hour. No tracks, no suspension cables. If you enjoy the ride, make sure your pilot's license is up to date then ask for an application.

J.D. Scarborough, 66, the sole aerial applicator for Ronnie Lee's RCL Flying Service in Dawson, has managed to survive his profession for 41 years, describing the work as "long periods of total boredom, sprinkled with periods of absolute terror." He was 25 when he started, he said, convinced by his uncle that flying was the way to go.

"I was a crane operator in Brunswick at the time," Scarborough said, "and I told (my uncle) I wasn't interested in flying. He finally got me to go out with him over the water to see some whales that were out there. I though that was just the coolest thing and it wasn't long before I was taking lessons."

It was about a year after that Scarborough's uncle was killed in a crop dusting accident," Scarborough said. There were others.

"This boy that was working with me -- I saw him when he went down," Scarborough said. "I got in the truck and ran over as quick as I could get there but he was completely burned up. It made me a lot more careful. It sure did."

Scarborough himself has crashed -- or nearly so "a few times," he said, from running out of gas (just once), engine failure or snagging power lines.

"I flipped a Cessna upside-down in a creek one time," said Scarborough, chuckling, "I couldn't get over the trees so I hit the dump lever to drop my chemicals, but I still couldn't get over. When I put myself on the ground and hit the brakes I flipped over into the water."

Scarborough was able to disengage his harness and free himself from the plane, but he had to walk back to the airport. He said that during his adventure his friend flew over the same spot several times but never noticed him. Despite a cavalier attitude, Scarborough thinks about his own death or injury.

"All that's in the back of your mind the whole time," Scarborough said. "When things have happened to other people and not to you, you have to wonder 'why them and not me."

While the loss of life is possible on any given day, Scarborough says it's not as dangerous as it used to be. He flies a near $1 million turbo-jet aircraft made in Albany by Thrush Aircraft.

According to Scarborough, the plane does a lot the work for him. An advanced GPS system, coupled with computer programing gives latitude and longitude of fields. In the interest of efficiency, the pilot is guided swath by swath which path to take over a field.

Applied chemicals are much safer now, said Scarborough, who has worked with some really toxic substances, including the infamous "agent orange," because they're designed to "do what they're going to do" in the first few hours of application, before becoming perfectly safe with exposure to sunlight.

A computer controls how many gallons of insecticide are applied to each swath or acre, even in the presence of a headwind or tailwind. At any given moment Scarborough knows heading, speed and altitude above sea level. When the application is finished he can provide the client with most of the same information, accounting for every second of the job.

"I enjoy working and I got no day set to retire," Scarborough said. "As long as I can do a good job I'll be right here."

Sensenich Celebrates 80 years - with 80% off

Sensenich Celebrates 80 years – with 80% off

Sensenich Celebrates 80 Years in business with 80% off

Sensenich Propeller will be celebrating 80 years in business at the Airventure Oshkosh 2012 fly-in this year, by giving one of its next 80 customers an 80% discount on his or her new prop.

"I hate gimmicks," says company President Don Rowell, "but hey, this is a birthday celebration; and who wouldn't want 80% off?"

To be eligible, a private customer (not an airframe manufacturer or OEM) must be one of the first 80 to buy and pay for a Sensenich prop between the close of Sun 'n Fun and the opening of Oshkosh. Any new or rebuilt Sensenich prop purchased from the factory -- wood, metal, or composite -- is eligible. The winner will be drawn at Sensenich's Press Conference at Airventure (date to be confirmed soon, and will be seen in the official show schedule); the winner need not be present to win.

Sensenich has manufactured props for the industry since 1932, and its lineup now encompasses propellers for airboats and UAVs, along with traditional aviation, in classic wood, metal, and industry-leading ground-adjustable composite props in two- or three-blade configurations, for engines including many experimental powerplants, plus Rotax, Jabiru, Continental, and Lycoming engines up to 320 cubic inches -- with more on the way.

What does Sensenich plan for its 90th celebration? Rowell says, "We'll have to wait and see."

More: www.sensenich.com
 

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