All posts tagged 'Aircraft' - Page 4

Citation X Captain Pilots For World-Renowned Fractional Operator

   On warm and sunny days here in Louisville, Kentucky, I have made a habit of going out to the field that lies due south of my father’s house. There in the field I feel at home; I lie down in the cool, soft grass, look up at the endless sky as I ponder my life. High above this planet where the vapor turns to gas, there is no such thing as hurt, there is no such thing as pain; there is no war and there is no evil. Up there, life is peaceful, beautiful and every shade of blue. It fascinates me to imagine how simple life could be; all we have to do is take the time to stop and see the world around us. Life has a funny way of twisting and turning in every direction except the one we are expecting; and once we lose our way, we are apt to miss out on something really great. There are always going to be reasons why we never did those things we wanted most, but that is so silly. Live your life, do everything you ever dreamed of doing and don’t look back.

   This time, my story is about a boy who knew from a very young age that he wanted to be a pilot. So much so that he would lie awake at night, letting his imagination carry him away as he slipped into fantasies of flight. The year was 1970, young Jeffrey Newcomb was twelve years of age and constantly on the lookout for anything aviation. Jeff would spend days with his nose in a flying magazine, any that he could find. Specifically, Jeff he recalls reading Air Progress, Private Pilot, Plane and Pilot and Flying. Jeff wasn’t quite sure why this dream had found him, be it spiritual or for the simplicity of freedom; but he supposed it didn’t matter anyway. What mattered was that he knew he was going to be a pilot someday. Unfortunately, bad news was lurking in the shadows for your young Jeff. One night over a family dinner, Jeffrey attempted to first express his passion for aviation to his parents. Needless to say, times were different then and aviation was less than safe according to Jeff’s mother and father. Jeff’s father had served time in the NAVY and although he had not piloted himself, he had a horrible fear of flight and refused to see his son put himself in such “danger.” On top of that, it has been said that the 70s and early 80s were NOT the best time to become a career pilot simply due to the large number of military pilots coming out of the Vietnam war. Ultimately, Jeff’s father had different ideas for his son and promptly began pushing him towards a career in business, sales and marketing.

   When the time came for Jeff to go away for college, he headed off to the University of New Hampshire in order to complete his undergrad degree. In 1979 Jeff graduated from UNH with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration as his father had suggested. Jeff continued forward with in his education and almost immediately ventured off to Antioch New England Graduate School located in Keene, New Hampshire, where he received his master’s degree in counseling Psychology. Still unsure as to what profession he may finally end up pursuing, Jeff went off to George Mason University located in Fairfax, Virginia where he completed a second master’s degree in Clinical Psychology.

   In 1987, Jeff went to work part time with an old country medical doctor out of a private office. For the next five years the medical doctor and Jeff worked together helping each other, help others. Once a week, Jeff would take over this medical office in order to meet with his clients for their routine therapy sessions. Jeffery enjoyed helping people in any way that he could, yet, he began to notice a pattern in his work. Although Jeff met with many different types of patients over the years, he found that he primarily spoke with married couples in couple’s type therapy. Some rekindled their love while others ended harshly in divorce and misfortune. Although these relationships and occurrences all took vital importance in Jeff’s life, none affected him quite as much as the divorce of his own parents. In 1992 Jeff’s parents filed for a divorce and just like that Jeff’s life had changed. He no longer desired a career in psychology; Jeff was ready to do just exactly what his parents had always advised him not to do. Needless to say, in January of 1993, when Jeff was thirty-five years old he began taking flight lessons. Again, people in Jeff’s life discouraged him from aviation. They told him that he was too old, the lessons would cost too much money, he would never be able to make a career out of flying without military background, etc.

Jeff wasn’t listening.

   Luckily, Jeffrey had friends in the business. His old pal Lee and colleague Greg owned and ran a small FBO named Sky Bright out of Laconia, New Hampshire. There in Laconia, Jeffrey Newcomb learned to fly despite every negative thing anyone had ever told him. It took Jeff roughly one year to complete all necessary pilot training and in 1993, he became certified to instruct and began teaching student pilots at Sky Bright. At this point in Jeffrey’s career he needed to begin building his time in multi-engine aircraft so that he could begin a new job as a charter pilot and work his way up in business. Some twenty thousand dollars later, Jeff was successfully checked out to fly the Beechcraft Baron as well as the Cessna 310 and in no time at all he was began his new career as a charter pilot flying the Baron for Sky Bright.

   In the spring of 1995, Jeff jumped on board a new flying opportunity and was off to Orlando, Florida in order to pursue an offer to fly for Comair Airlines. At Comair, Jeffrey flew as first officer for several years before he was transitioned north to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he became the captain on the Brasilia for one year. During these five years Jeff also flew the Canadair Regional Jet as well as the Metroliner. Newcomb absolutely loved this job and intended to stay…until a massive strike broke out in 2001. Just in the nick of time one of the largest international, fractional operator/time shares opened their door in search of a captain to fly their Cessna Citation X aircraft. Jeffrey Newcomb calls it “a spiritual thing” that he was lucky enough to be granted with such an incredible opportunity. In no time at all the cards played out and he was dealt a fantastic hand. Suddenly Jeffrey was on board and working his dream career with only 4500 hours of flight time.

   Today, twelve years later, Jeffrey has 4600+ hours in the Citation X aircraft, he has maintained his career with the same time share company and he says he could not be more thrilled! Jeffery will tell anyone he meets that he absolutely loves serving people; he enjoys making things happen and in turn, seeing people smile. “Airline flying was easy compared to private! However, flying corporate and fractional are so much more rewarding because you (as their pilot)get the opportunity to actually work one on one with your guests” Jeffrey states. “The greatest satisfaction is providing service directly to the people that you fly.” Also, Jeff thoroughly enjoys the variety of his trips. During an average week, Jeff typically flies to several different places. On any given day he may be flying a family to fabulous Bermuda for vacation, then turn around and spend the night in Aspen, Colorado that very same evening. With his current company, Jeff has also become very accustom to transcontinental flights where he may begin a trip in Teterboro, New Jersey, have dinner off the coast of southern California and be prepared for takeoff to Lakeland, Florida first thing the very next morning!

   The moral of this story is to not ever give up trying, on the things you want most out of life. Thirteen year old Jeffrey Newcomb sat at his family’s dinner table and thought very sincerely that all was lost. He thought his dreams of one day becoming a pilot were no more and he certainly would be sentenced to live a life on the ground. I’m here today folks, to tell you the good news of Jeff’s very real success story. On this very day, Jeff is a pilot working for a very successful company and living a very successful life. Against all odds, Jeffrey Newcomb did it. Currently, Jeff is living back home in small town New Hampshire with his adoring wife, Adriana and any spare time that he finds, he designates to students pilots. Jeff is excited to be back and instructing at Sky Bight, where he taught twenty years ago. Flying still excites Jeff to the nth degree. He feels excited to push the starter button on the engine of his Citation X and he still gets butterflies as he prepares for takeoff. Jeff enjoys watching the sun rise above the clouds and he states that he has the best office in the whole world; seeing the stars at night and ground below thrills him now more than ever and he wouldn’t trade for a thing.

Jim and Matt

Note from the Author: Thank you so much for taking the time to stop by and read my article! I cannot even begin to describe how much I’ve learned in just a few short months since I started with this series. You are all such inspiring aviators and pilots, so thanks for reaching out to me with your comments and emails. I hope you enjoyed this article, and keep up the awesome thoughts, comments and on-blog conversations! -As always, please feel free to message me directly with your thoughts at - [email protected]. I’d love to hear from you!

NTSB To Assist Afghan Authorities With Investigation Into Bagram Cargo Plane Crash

WASHINGTON - The National Transportation Safety Board will lead a team to assist the Afghanistan Ministry of Transportation and Commercial Aviation in the investigation of a cargo plane crash at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan.

NTSB Senior Air Safety Investigator Tim LeBaron will be the U.S. accredited representative. He will lead a team of three additional investigators from the NTSB as well as representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration and The Boeing Company.

The private cargo plane, a Boeing 747-400 operated by National Air Cargo, crashed just after takeoff from the U.S.-operated air base at 11:20 a.m. local time Monday. All seven crewmembers onboard were killed and the airplane destroyed. The seven crew members were all American citizens. The accident site is within the perimeter of Bagram Air Base.

The international cargo flight was destined for Dubai World Central - Al Maktoum International Airport, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

The Afghanistan Ministry of Transportation and Commercial Aviation is leading the investigation and will be the sole source of information regarding the investigation. According to the International Civil Aviation Organization, they can be reached at (873) 68 2341450 / 49 or by fax at (873) 68 1280784.

Contact Information
Office of Public Affairs
490 L'Enfant Plaza, SW
Washington, DC 20594

Eric M. Weiss
(202) 314-6100
[email protected]

Regional Corporate Pilot: via “The Pilot Slot”

   A leadership coach once spoke of growing up in Nebraska. When he spoke, he said “there are things you learn while growing up in the country that you just can't learn anywhere else.” I found that extremely fascinating; after all, a person’s roots typically tends to tell a lot about that person. Interesting fact; because of this article, I learned that many famous names have come out of Nebraska, including Fred Astaire, Marlon Brando, Johnny Carson and Larry the Cable Guy! Although I’ve not personally met with any of those people, each of them had what it takes to fight for what they wanted in life. Becoming a household name doesn’t typically happen overnight. I would like to share with you a story of one truly inspirational pilot and fine Nebraska native that is living and breathing aviation every single day.

   Jim McIrvin was born in Nebraska in 1964. He grew up on his family’s farm, went to school and played with his friends; no different than any other young boy his age. Jim was just a boy in grade school when he met a science teacher that changed his life. He never forgot this man, for he was a man who collected and built model airplanes. If that wasn’t inspiration enough, Jim’s best friend’s “Uncle Gene” was sure to push Jim over the aviation edge. Jim was in the second grade when “Uncle Gene” came into his class for career day and spoke high and wide of his job as a Coast Guard Pilot. People don’t tend to forget the days that change their lives, and for Mr. McIrvin, this had been one of those days. Years later, while the family packed things up and prepared to move off of the farm, Jim would stumble across his father’s dusty old log book from World War II. Although his father had been trained as a pilot in the war, he never had a chance to actually fly in the war. Nonetheless, Jim appreciated and respected his father for this, and so it was, aviation had officially been set in stone for Mr. Jim McIrvin. Unfortunately, as a boy, flight was nothing more than a dream for McIrvin. Jim spent most of his childhood with his head in the clouds, dreaming of a day when his feet might join him. All the while, Jim kept busy on the ground, building model airplanes of his own and farming his family’s land. While in high school, Jim applied and was accepted into an Air Force ROTC program that would eventually grant him with an opportunity to attend college in Saint Louis, Missouri at Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology; via “the pilot slot.”

   It wasn’t until 1983 however, that Jim’s feet finally met his heart and soul in the sky. He was a sophomore in college, spending his spare time in one of the various local FBO’s of the Saint Louis, where he would go to watch the planes take off and come in. One afternoon, a man flew in from out of town in his personal Bonanza aircraft and asked Jim if he would care to accompany this man to a local airplane museum. Startled at first, certainly Jim couldn’t pass on an opportunity such as this. He kindly complied and off they went into the horizon via the stranger’s Bonanza aircraft in search of the aviation museum.

   During Jim’s senior year in college, he was awarded with his second pilot scholarship; this time, Jim had been awarded with an opportunity to pursue flight training in an accredited Air Force pilot training program. However, before he would become eligible to be sent into this pilot training, the Air Force required Jim to complete a rather lengthy screening process as well as successfully accomplish his first solo flight within seven hours of dual training with an instructor. Once Jim had successfully completed this task, as well as the required screening, he would be finished with his Air Force duties until the day he graduated as an officer. Until then however, there was no was no way that Jim would be sitting around with his feet on the ground! McIrvin had begun with his private training and wasn’t planning on stopping after just one solo flight. At that point, Jim took matters into his own hands and finished his private training at the FBO with his instructor. Once Jim had successfully completed his private pilot training he began competing with the NIFA program (National Intercollegiate Flying Association) via Park's flying team; the Flying Billikens. Apparently, Jim had been affiliated with this program throughout all four years of his college career; however, he had only participated as a ground member. It wasn’t until McIrvin’s senior year that he would compete nationally in the “SAFECON” flight competition, located at Ohio State University.

   Finally in 1986, Jim McIrvin graduated from Park’s College of Engineering, and carried on into the United States Air Force. During McIrvin’s military training he flew the Cessna T-37 Tweet as well as the Northrop T-38 Talon aircraft for precisely one year. Upon graduating from this training, McIrvin went directly to the FAA in order to test for and acquire his commercial pilot’s license. At that point, Jim was sincerely in need of flight time; no worries though, Jim was headed overseas on his very first Air Force assignment flying an F-111 in Desert Storm combat. In 1991, Jim became a certified flight instructor teaching student pilots to fly military aircraft such as the F-111, F-16 and the T-38. After teaching students on the side for just one year, McIrvin received his ATP rating in 1992. In 2000, Jim decided to transition into the Air Force Reserves in order to take a very promising FO airline job working for United Airlines, flying the Boeing 737. This was fantastic experience and not to mention great flight time for Mr. McIrvin. Unfortunately, once 9/11 happened, United Airlines laid off several thousand employees for a companywide downsize movement and needless to say, Jim was one of these several thousand involved. It was because of the downsize that Jim decided to reconnect with the military on a full-time, active duty status. In 2007 Jim added his single engine sea rating as well as a multi-engine sea rating and in 2010 McIrvin became type rated to fly in the Embraer Phenom 100 as well as the Phenom 300.

   In 2008, Jim retired from the United Stated Air Force and went to fly for the newly developed flight department of The Southern Bleacher Company. With this company, Jim flew in one of two different aircraft, depending on the job; either a Socata TBM 850 or Cirrus SR22. Today however, four years later, the Southern Bleacher Company’s fleet has grown and now includes two very beautiful aircraft; an Embraer Phenom 100 as well as a Piper Malibu Mirage. Jim’s job as chief pilot is to maintain these aircraft and of course, fly them to and from regional job sites. As a hobby, McIrvin continues flight instructing on the side. He is also very involved with the Young Eagles program and he serves as mentor pilot in the Phenom aircraft.

   From a very young age Jim knew that he wanted to fly. He didn’t look at the long term things like time or cost; and he didn’t care about the expense of how he might get there. Jim knew what he wanted from life and he never took “No” for an acceptable answer. “Just because the answer was No today, does not necessarily mean it will be the same answer tomorrow, or the next day” Jim stated. Jim McIrvin enjoys being a role model and a leader in the aviation world. He encourages all young people who dream of flight, (people like me) to take that leap and never look back. McIrvin says “Don’t be afraid to ask the questions; if it’s something you want, don’t ever stop trying.” As I conclude I would like to thank Mr. Jim McIrvin for contacting me and telling me his story.
   -- Jim shared with me a specific memory that touched his heart in a very special way. Years ago, Jim was very much involved with the Young Eagles program, even more so than he currently is today. McIrvin was giving free discovery flights to the young cadets involved in the program and out of the kindness of his heart; he chose to fly these cadets in his own private aircraft. One young man in particular, by the name Matt, sought after Mr. Jim McIrvin and asked for help in acquiring his private license. Young matt had been the only student that had chased after flight lessons and his willingness to fly sparkled in his eyes. Young Matt wasn’t taking “No” for an acceptable answer. Jim greatly appreciated Matt’s drive to learn, and made a bargain. Matt was to come to the airport on a regular basis and clean Jim’s personal aircraft in exchange for flight lessons. As the story goes, Matthew completed his private and carried all the way through flight training. In 2010 Matt graduated from flight school and is now a pilot in the U.S. Air force.

   There are pilots all over the world who want to share their story and their talents with young flight-driven students. Like Jim McIrvin, these pilots hope to help in leading students down a pathway to success. In the words of Jim McIrvin, “if it’s your dream, keep after it and never let it go.”

Jim and Matt

Phenom 100 with Jim

Note from the Author: Thank you so much for taking the time to stop by and read my articles! I cannot even begin to describe how much I’ve learned in just a few short months since I started with this series. You are all such inspiring aviators and pilots, so thanks for reaching out to me with your comments and emails. I hope you enjoyed this article, now get yourselves prepared for my next article and in the meantime, keep up the awesome thoughts, comments and on-blog conversations! -As always, please feel free to message me directly with your thoughts at - [email protected]. I’d love to hear from you!

Eclipse 550 Jet 'Powered Up' on Its Way to First Delivery

 

Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. celebrates a major production milestone - the first power up of the new production Eclipse 550 Twin-Engine Jet. The first production Eclipse 550 aircraft successfully powered up its two Pratt & Whitney PW610F engines, and the aircraft systems came on line today at the company’s facility in Albuquerque, N.M.

Eclipse Aerospace officially restarted the Eclipse Jet aircraft production line last June and continues to track for delivery of the first new Eclipse 550 series aircraft in the third quarter of this year. Built upon the same proven airframe as the Eclipse 500 aircraft, the new Eclipse 550 series is enhanced by additional technologies including a dual and redundant integrated flight management system and independent standby displays all powered by advanced microprocessors.

“What a great accomplishment by our entire team at Eclipse,” said Mason Holland, CEO of Eclipse Aerospace. “This event is another key signal to the world that we continue on our methodical and well executed plan to reintroduce production and delivery of the Eclipse 550 Jet this year.”

The operation of the current fleet of over 260 Eclipse twin-engine jets have already garnered a reputation as one of the most technologically advanced, safe, and fuel-efficient jets in general aviation. The Eclipse 550 will be powered by the same PW610F turbofan engines as are used in the EA-500, which collectively produce 1,800 lbs. of thrust. This gives the 6,000 lb. Eclipse Jet a maximum cruise speed of 375 knots and a maximum IFR range of 1,300 nm with a 45-minute fuel reserve. Like the EA-500, the Eclipse 550 will have a maximum service ceiling of 41,000 ft. and a cruise fuel flow of only 59 gal/hr.

“The global markets are improving, sales activity and orders continue to grow, and the Eclipse Jet is priced extremely competitively as the only jet available in the world for less than three million US dollars”, stated Holland. “This attractive acquisition price coupled with our industry leading operating costs of only $1.69 per nautical mile makes the Eclipse Jet a great value for our owner flown customers as well as Corporations and Governments alike.”

Eclipse 550 customers will also be able to customize their aircraft with new features including auto-throttles, synthetic vision, enhanced vision, satellite phones, custom interiors, and anti-skid brakes.

FMI: www.eclipse.aero

FAA Approves Certification Plan for Boeing 787 Battery Solution

FAA has approved Boeing’s certification plan for the redesigned 787 Dreamliner battery system, the first step in the process to return the aircraft to commercial service.

The agency grounded all in-service Boeing 787s in January, following several incidents involving malfunctioning of the plane’s lithium ion battery system and other critical components while it was being operated on commercial flights.

In a statement, FAA said the internal battery components have been redesigned to minimize initiation of a short circuit within the battery, better insulation of the cells and the addition of a new containment and venting system.

During its ongoing investigation of the Japanese Airlines 787 battery fire that occurred at Boston’s Logan International Airport in January, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) discovered that the origin of the fire was a short circuit occurring within one of the battery’s eight cells.

"Our proposal includes three layers of improvements. First, we've improved design features of the battery to prevent faults from occurring and to isolate any that do. Second, we've enhanced production, operating and testing processes to ensure the highest levels of quality and performance of the battery and its components," said Ray Conner, president and CEO of Boeing's commercial airplanes unit. "Third, in the unlikely event of a battery failure, we've introduced a new enclosure system that will keep any level of battery overheating from affecting the airplane or being noticed by passengers," Conner added.

The redesign of the battery system will be approved only if the battery system completes all required tests and analysis to comply with FAA requirements. The airworthiness directive issued by the agency in January is still in effect, although two 787s have been approved to perform limited test flights. Those two planes will have the new versions of the battery containment system installed.

“We are confident the plan we approved today includes all the right elements to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the battery system redesign,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta. “Today’s announcement starts a testing process which will demonstrate whether the proposed fix will work as designed.”

The agency did not disclose a possible return to service date for the 787.

Article Published: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - By: www.aviationtoday.com

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