All posts tagged 'Airports' - Page 2

The Importance of WAAS with LPV

Mark Wilken – Director of Avionics Sales with Elliott Aviation
www.elliottaviation.com

Traditionally, ground-based landing systems have been the only method for low visibility approaches. Many business aircraft, however, are operated from airports without ground-based systems and are restricted to using non-precision approaches. If your aircraft is equipped with WAAS and LPV you have many more options to get to where you are going safely and efficiently.

There is a common misconception in the industry that WAAS and LPV are one in the same, however, they are two completely different systems.

WAAS, or Wide Area Augmentation System, was developed by the FAA to augment GPS to improve accuracy. Put simply, it is a corrected GPS. It is accurate to about one meter of your actual position. Combined with LPV, it can get you into more airports in a more direct manner. Without LPV, WAAS is just nothing more than an accurate sensor.

LPV, or Localizer Performance with Vertical Guidance, gives you an enhanced database in your FMS GPS and allows ILS-like approaches at airports that do not have an ILS or ground-based system. LPV approaches allow for minimums to be as low as 200 feet.

If LPV approaches are not available at the airport you are traveling, they likely have LP approaches available. LP, or Localizer Performance Approaches, provide precision lateral guidance using the enhanced accuracy WAAS provides. As an example, an LP approach into Telluride, Colorado allow for minims of an additional 460 feet for days when the weather is less than perfect.

Mark Wilken is the Director of Avionics Sales for Elliott Aviation which employs over 40 avionics technicians at their headquarters in Moline, IL. Mark began his career at Elliott Aviation in 1989 as a bench technician repairing radios and quickly became the manager of the department. Mark helped launch Elliott Aviation’s Garmin G1000 retrofit program where the company has installed more King Air G1000’s than all other dealers in the world combined. Recently, he has headed STC programs for the newly-launched Aircell ATG 2000 system for Hawker 8000/850/900, Phenom 300 and King Air 350/B200/B200GT. Mark is a licensed pilot and holds an associate’s degree in avionics and a bachelor’s degree in aviation management from Southern Illinois University.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

Lee Bottom $100 Hamburger Tornado Relief Fundraiser Fly-In Announced

Legendary Lee Bottom Flying Field, Damaged By Tornado, Needs YOUR Help
Article by: www.aero-news.net
FMI: www.leebottom.com

Lee Bottom Flying Field, a near legendary airport favored by grass roots aviators the world over, will hold the $100 Hamburger Tornado Relief Fundraiser Fly-In on September 29th, 2012.

On March 2nd, 2012, the Indiana airport suffered a direct hit by a Tornado -- and the results weren't pretty. When the winds died, every piece of equipment, and every building, was either damaged or destroyed. Soon thereafter, it was realized the facilities no longer existed to host their well known annual fly-in, The Wood, Fabric, & Tailwheels Fly-In.

This gave rise to the idea of a much-needed fundraiser.

Lee Bottom Flying Field isn't just known for its pleasant atmosphere, it also has a reputation for unique marketing. The $100 Hamburger Fundraiser is the latest example of this. "We couldn't just have a fundraiser. It had to be something different; something that people would expect from Lee Bottom; something that they could have fun with while helping us rebuild", said Rich Davidson. "Thanks to the tornado, it also had to be something we could do with minimal facilities and equipment". The $100 Hamburger Tornado Relief Fundraiser Fly-In was born.

Playing on one of aviation's most well known themes, the fundraiser is really quite simple. Attendance is $100. Once inside, anyone attending is eligible to receive a free hamburger made by the Friends of Lee Bottom. People wishing to contribute who can't be on hand can purchase an entry ticket and the Friends of Lee Bottom will give a burger to a kid in their honor.

When recently asked about the rebuild, Rich Davidson said, "It's about more than a rebuild. We would like make this an opportunity to build a new facility that would better serve the pilots who enjoy visiting the field."


(Image Credit: www.leebottom.com)

Boeing 787 Engine Failure Sparks Fire at Charleston Airport

Article by: Gregory Polek
Brought to you by: AINONLINE

Another Boeing 787 engine problem—this time involving a General Electric GEnx turbofan in an airplane destined for Air India—sparked a grass fire at Charleston International Airport during a pre-flight test on Saturday, forcing the airport to close its main runway for more than an hour. The contained engine failure has prompted an investigation by the NTSB, Boeing and GE, maker of the engine now in service with Japan Airlines on four 787s.

Evidence so far points to a failure in the “back end” of the engine, specifically in the area of the low-pressure turbine. “GE Aviation continues to work with the NTSB and Boeing to determine the cause of Saturday’s incident during a ground-test run in Charleston on a newly built 787,” said the engine company in a statement sent to AIN. “GE is working aggressively to move the engine involved in the incident to a GE facility for an investigative tear-down.”

The incident involved the second of three 787s that have rolled off Boeing’s new assembly line in Charleston, South Carolina. It came roughly a week after Japan’s All Nippon Airways had to ground its five Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-powered 787s following the manufacturer’s discovery of corrosion in a crown gear within an external gearbox during product development testing.

ANA has since returned four of its five airplanes to service, and plans to redeploy the fifth early this week.

Travel Is Going Social, Will Business Aviation Follow?

Many of us who work in business aviation wonder if people would be willing to share their travel plans, share a flight together, let others know what they are up to, so they can meet up on trips, share rides from the airport to the hotel and so forth.

In other words, will business aviation travel go social?

One of the terms used for the aircraft we operate is “private” which does not exactly line up with “social” in a public sense.  We fly “private jets.” Private sounds like I don’t want the public to know what I am doing, where I am going and I most likely do not want to share my private ride.

Sharing is already happening in the world of airline travel and the events that drive travel; maybe to ease the pain inflicted on travelers by the airline system.

As I have looked around on the internet for social media platforms related to travel some really interesting ones have started showing up.

[more]

·         Planely allows airline travelers to share their flight itinerary with the hope of connecting with others on the same flight. If this builds critical mass it could become a valuable tool.

·         IMGuest allows travelers to share their hotel location and plans in order to meet up face to face with others at the same or close by hotels, and expand their network.

·         Plancast is a site that is really done well, allowing people to post their plans for attending conventions, local events, music events, etc. and easily see who else is attending. A great way to make connections both locally and at away events.

·         TripIt, which just announced its acquisition by Concur (Nasdaq: CNQR), was one of the first travel sites allowing travelers to share their itineraries that gained a mass adoption. Concur is a leading provider of integrated travel and expense management solutions and apparently thinks TripIt is on to something based on the acquisition price.

These sites allow you to sign up and use them for free, and in some cases check in through your Facebook or Twitter accounts. The Facebook check-in creates an instant profile for fellow travelers to see plus it gives the site access to your Facebook information.

So the question asked again: Are travelers willing to share their travel plans in the hope of making the experience more social? The answer seems to be yes, as travelers are signing up to these social technology platforms in droves.

What about personal and business travel in private chartered aircraft?

What is the value in sharing travel plans with others you don’t know too well? Is it too risky?  Most of these sites tout the value proposition of networking and meeting up with people you would not otherwise meet.

The value of each of us knowing where others are going can go beyond just networking.

If you and I find out we are going to the same places, we can get together and come up with new solutions for getting there more efficiently by sharing costs and buying travel collaboratively. Eventually we may even be able to drive the market to offer better solutions that fit our needs, versus what suppliers of air mass transportation offer us today.

It would great if we could go when and where we really want to go in the most efficient manner as opposed to being pushed and shoved through a system that is not designed to really meet our intentions.

When that happens can the private aircraft, and the industry that supports it, be a possible solution?

Find aircraft for sale listings and pilot resources for U.S. airports on GlobalAir.com.

VIDEO: Flying out of Teterboro with the Beach Boys

[youtube:mzM3aaypEYo]

This video of pilot-turned-Beach-Boy Mike Wagner sings of the troubles that sometimes arise when trying to fly a business jet out of Teterboro Airport in New Jersey (TEB).  In the five days since it has been posted, it has found fellowship within the bizav community via Facebook and Twitter, garnering more than 21,000 views in the process. Enjoy.

End of content

No more pages to load