All posts tagged 'Aviation' - Page 12

The Future of Aviation in the U.S.

By: Brent Owens
Owner/Publisher: iflyblog.com

future of aviationWhen the group was deciding on a theme for this month’s Blogging in Formation series (#blogformation), we agreed to anchor it around July 4th (U.S. Independence Day). We settled on The Future of Aviation in the U.S., but we encouraged each other to explore the edges, good or bad, as we saw fit.

We Are The Future of Aviation In The United States

 
Aviation in the U.S. is at an interesting crossroads. We have enjoyed large populations of pilots and a commensurate number of airplanes through the bulk of the last century. Now with Baby Boomers aging and economies melting, the population of aviators has reached historically low levels. Couple that with the cost to fly at unprecedentedly high levels, things aren’t looking good. Also, we have more regulation, more oversight, more scrutiny, and our safety record, although good, is not good enough in the eyes of regulators. Combine all this with our modern distractions and it is very tough to recruit young men and women into our ranks, especially as a career. Flying for fun, or for a living, in the U.S. has proved to be a very difficult proposition in recent decades.

So with all this as the backdrop you would think that aviation here has gone the way of CB radios or Disco, but you’d be wrong. The group that has remained in this new era is more vibrate, engaged, and resourceful than ever. If you have been to Oshkosh, you know what I mean. It is truly amazing to be in the presence of such an awesome group of dedicated people.

The passion from those of us left is infectious. We are constantly looking for alternative ways to continue to do what we love and spread the gospel of flying. The organizations that represent us, are as strong as ever and are working hard to make sure we don’t give up any more of our freedoms to bureaucracy and security theatre.

Since we are in the eve of Independence Day in the United States, it is more than appropriate to celebrate our successes and put behind us our losses. Looking forward is the only way to get where we want to be in the future. It is incumbent on us to be leaders in our small family and do our part to light the way for future generations.

In a related article I wrote about how the EAA is working on a program to bridge the gap between Young Eagles prospects and future pilots (to be announced at Oshkosh 2013). This endeavor, will tap into a great deal of grassroots energy and it is bound to succeed. With it, we may come away with our own version of a “pilot boom” that hasn’t been seen since the Baby Boomers took up wings.

New pilot starts is really an important concept, because this is what will fuel the industry into the future. If we don’t have this, our ranks will keep dwindling away and soon we will have no voice to counter opposition and no economy of scale. If that occurs it’s only a matter of time before flying will be completely inaccessible to the average American. Several organizations have recognized this decades ago and started working on plans to stave off the bleeding, but it hasn’t been enough. Our current economic climate hasn’t helped either.

My plan is to do my part to support all these new (and old) efforts, because I know the greater good is the end goal. That also means; giving rides to people who are interested in flying; getting involved in local and national organizations that support us; writing my politician when our freedoms are under attack; volunteering at events; flying for charity, if possible; speaking at functions about aviation; (add your ideas here). See related article here.

We all have a choice to make, fly and be free or accept a fate of mediocrity. WE are the future of aviation in the United States and with that comes an awesome responsibility. What are your intentions?

30 Minutes Of Aerobatic Aviation

   Lima Lima Flight team – Originally the Mentor Flyers, began as a non-profit recreational flying club in 1975. The fifteen member club was based out of a residential airpark community known as Naper Aero Club Field (LL10) located just outside of Naperville, Illinois.

   The Lima Lima Flight Team had always been very intrigued by the brightly painted, yellow T-34 Mentor aircraft of the Navy. Since formation flying had always been uniquely a military activity, the club decided to have their T34 aircraft painted to identically mirror the original Navy training colors; with just a few minor differences of course. Specifically, the black tail band; this has become the Lima Lima trademark. Finally, the "Lima Lima" name was derived from the FAA designator of the team's home field in Naperville; LL-10, hence the LL on the tails of their aircraft.

   The Lima Lima Flight Team has evolved their crew in a way that mimics that of the military. As the military trains their pilots, they recognize different levels of formation skills, from basic tactical formation flying all the way up to Blue Angel and Thunderbird demonstration teams. The Lima Lima Flight Team is no different, they practice on a weekly basis, and over time are able to develop more sophisticated formation skills. The team's demonstration is flown with six airplanes, and each of their shows includes several different formation configurations. Some of the favorites include the six ship wedge, double arrowhead, basic finger four and diamond formations. The Lima Lima Flight Team has developed a series of formation aerobatic maneuvers which each demonstrate the full range of the T-34 performance envelope.

   Here in Louisville, Kentucky we have been in celebration mode as we prepared for the Kentucky Derby horse race. Thunder Over Louisville is our annual kickoff event of the Kentucky Derby Festival, occurring each year near the end of April and always overlooking the Ohio River. Each year, the event draws thousands of people to the heart of downtown Louisville all in high anticipation for not only the second largest fireworks display in the nation, but also for the aerobatic airshow!

   In the days leading up to Thunder Over Louisville this year, most of the aerobatic pilots came to our local FBO (Bowman Field KLOU) and I was lucky enough to meet one of the aerobatic pilots of the Lima Lima Flight Team! His name is John Rippinger, but you can call him "The Ripper" for short.

   Originally from Schaumburg, Illinois, John is the president and CEO of Rippinger Financial Group. John has been flying for over 40 years in both fixed wing aircraft as well as balloons. In addition to his flight duties, John also manages over twenty of the product sponsors for the Lima Lima Flight Team. John, his wife Susan and their dog Aileron still live in Illinois today. John started flying T-34's in 1989 and has been a member of the team since 1992. This fast paced and high adrenalin sport, although fascinating to watch is in fact extremely dangerous. Being the student pilot that I am, I was extremely excited to inquire about the speed of his T-34 aircraft. He informed me that during their shows there are times when the aerobatic aircraft travel up to 210 knots; that's equivalent to anywhere between 240 - 250 miles per hour! On average, they expect to pull about 5.5 G's and "No," surprisingly they do not wear G-suits. I had to stop him there; so how do they function and continue to concentrate while pulling 5.5 G's without a G-suit? According to John (The Ripper), the answer is simple; "stiffen your abs and grunt" John says. By doing this simple procedure you are naturally securing your inside organs, and eventually this becomes second nature.

As we continued with our interview, John went on to explain the nature of the team's typical show plan. Each of their shows are strategically planned out and choreographed for them and every pilot has one specific place to be in the formation. The key is that the group remains consistent every single time they rehearse or perform. According to John; the actual act of flying the aircraft must be as familiar as breathing. His only job while flying his T-34 in formation with his five companion birds is to watch the leader at all times.

Again I am absolutely blown away in amazement. Acrobatic aviation is fantastic and extremely fascinating to watch, but I can honestly say that I had never been so openly exposed to aviation like this previously. I never understood the raw talent that goes into preforming a full 30-40 minute aerobatic airshow. I had absolutely no idea what it might feel like or look like as the human body undergoes high velocity tricks or intense G-force speeds. The talent, work and money that go behind the scenes of an aerobatic airshow is out of this world! I have met so many pilots already along my journey as an aviator, each of them fantastic in new and different ways that surprise me. The Ripper opened my eyes to a branch of aviation that I had not experienced at all and for that, I am ever grateful.

(Historical information provided by www.limalima.com)

Jim and Matt

Note from the Author: Thanks again for stopping by to read my articles! You are all such inspiring aviators and pilots, and I really appreciate you for reaching out to me with your comments and emails. I hope you enjoyed this article, and keep up the awesome thoughts, comments and on-blog conversations! -As always, please feel free to message us anytime at www.Globalair.com - We would love to hear from you!

EASA's First Executive Director Honored with 2013 European Business Aviation Award

Patrick Goudou Lauded for Collaboration with Industry in Setting Aviation Policies

Contacts: Dan Hubbard, (202) 783-9360, [email protected]
Ana Baptista, EBAA, +32 2 766 00 73, [email protected]


Geneva, Switzerland, May 21, 2013 – The European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) and National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) announced today that Patrick Goudou, who has served as the executive director for the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) since its establishment in 2003, has been honored with the 2013 European Business Aviation Award.

The award was presented during a May 21 luncheon on the first day of the 13th annual European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (EBACE2013), the only European exhibition focusing solely on business aviation. In presenting the award, EBAA Chairman Rodolfo Baviera lauded Goudou’s work in establishing EASA as an aviation rulemaking authority, as well as for his collaboration with the business aviation community in determining aviation policy.

“Thanks in large part to Patrick's work, it is well understood at EASA that effective regulations are those that have been informed through input from industry stakeholders, who have a first-hand understanding of what business aviation operations look like on a day-to-day basis,” Baviera said. “Not only has his collaborative approach been successful in the formation of effective business aviation safety regulations; it has also been successful in setting the tone for how EASA, as an agency, approaches its policymaking work with the business aviation community – one example being the recognition that business aviation needs different flight-and duty time rules from airline operations.”

Goudou's extensive background in the aerospace industry includes a 22-year career with the French General Delegation for Armaments (Delegation Generale pour l'Armement - DGA). Prior to joining EASA, Goudou served as chief executive of the French Aeronautical Maintenance Agency (Service de la maintenance aeronautique - SMA), where he oversaw that organization's responsibilities for engineering, maintenance and repairs to aircraft, engines and aircraft equipment, as well as for the design and production of aeronautical parts.

“Patrick came to EASA with a long-standing aviation background, which is a good thing, because he certainly needed that solid foundation to build an entire agency from the ground up,” Baviera added. “In spite of the countless priorities that would confront anyone trying to stand up a whole new agency, Patrick always had an open door to the business aviation community.”

Goudou will step down from his position at the end of August. He will be succeeded by Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) Joint Undertaking Executive Director Patrick Ky.

The annual European Business Aviation Awards have been given since the inception of EBACE in 2001. Past recipients are as follows (titles and affiliations shown were current at time of award presentation):

• David McMillan, director general of Eurocontrol, and Don Spruston, director general of the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) (2012).
• Peter Lonergan, former Biggin Hill Airport director, and Richard Gaona, Comlux Aviation Group president (2011).
• Elie Zelouf, senior vice president of Jet Aviation, and officials at Aéroports de Paris (2010).
• Marwan Khalek, CEO and co-founder of Gama Aviation Limited, and Lyon-Bron Business Airport (2009).
• Mark Booth, chairman and CEO of NetJets Europe (2008).
• Judith Moreton, Bombardier Skyjet International, and Mark Wilson, British Business and General Aviation Association (2007).
• Geneva PALEXPO and Flight Safety International (2006).
• TAG Aviation and Cannes/Mandelieu Airport (2005).
• Jean-Francois Georges, Dassault Aviation, and Fernand Francois, European Business Aviation Association (2004).
• Ahid Quntar, Royal Wings/Arab Wings, and Andrew Walters, Regional Airports Ltd. (2003).
• Richard Gooding, London City Airport, and Jean-Pierre Jobin, Geneva International Airport (2002).
• Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, LEGO, and Frederik Sørensen, Head of Unit, European Commission (2001).
For more information on EBACE2013, visit www.ebace.aero/2013.

# # #

About EBAA: The European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) was founded in 1977 to defend the interests of business aviation. Today, more than 500 business aviation companies (direct members or members of associate organizations) rely on the EBAA to protect their business interests. It is the only voice to represent business aviation among the European institutions. For more information, visit www.ebaa.org.

About NBAA: Founded in 1947 and based in Washington, DC, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) is the leading organization for companies that rely on general aviation aircraft to help make their businesses more efficient, productive and successful. The Association represents more than 9,000 companies and provides more than 100 products and services to the business aviation community, including the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, the world's largest civil aviation trade show. Learn more about NBAA at www.nbaa.org.

Learjet 75 Aircraft Set for World Debut at EBACE 2013


MONTREAL, QUEBEC--(Marketwired - May 10, 2013) -

Bombardier Aerospace announced today that just one year after launching the Learjet 70 and Learjet 75 aircraft, it is returning to this year's edition of EBACE with the first production Learjet 75 jet. Alongside the debutante will be three additional class-leading jets.

The Challenger 300, Challenger 605 and Global 6000 aircraft will all be on display from May 21 - May 23, 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland at the 13th European Business Aviation Conference and Exhibition.

"This year's edition of EBACE will once again highlight Bombardier's leadership in the industry," said Steve Ridolfi, President, Bombardier Business Aircraft. "The debut of the Learjet 75 aircraft marks another exciting year of innovation and we look forward to delivering the first aircraft in the fourth quarter of this year."

Growing Support Network to Put Customers First

Bombardier Customer Services team members will be on hand to highlight the continuing growth of its comprehensive support network. Within the past year, the team has converted its Frankfurt parts depot to a full-service hub to accommodate a wider range of parts transactions, opened a business aircraft-focused Regional Support Office in Farnborough, U.K. and continued to drive greater volume and capabilities at its wholly owned Service Centre in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Bombardier Aircraft on Static Display at EBACE 2013

Learjet 75 aircraft: The Learjet 75 jet features the pioneering Bombardier Vision Flight Deck with an interior influenced from its bigger stablemate, the Learjet 85 aircraft. This jet will soar above the traffic with a maximum altitude of 51,000 ft (15,545 m) and is capable of flying more than 2,000nm (3,704km)(i) between Geneva and Cairo non-stop(i).

Challenger 300 aircraft: The dependable Challenger 300 jet offers true transcontinental range and superior long-range cruise speed, with eight-to-10 passengers. Its 3,065nm (5,646km) range connects Geneva with Dubai non-stop and NBAA IFR reserves. Its superior airfield performance allows it to operate out of 5,000 ft (1,524 m) runways with ease(i). The Challenger 300 jet offers the best performance and value in its class, combined with a dispatch reliability that has consistently been above 99.7 per cent, it has exceeded customer expectations since its entry-into-service in 2004.

Challenger 605 aircraft: The revered Challenger 605 jet builds upon the legacy of productivity, quality and reliability of its predecessor, the peerless Challenger 604 jet. Leading its market share segment throughout the world, the Challenger 605 aircraft features one of the widest stand-up cabins of any large category business jet available today and can soar six passengers 4,000 nm (7,408 km) from Geneva to Montreal(i).

Global 6000 aircraft: The Global 6000 jet's large cabin size and levels of comfort, combined with an optional stand-up shower and the Bombardier Vision Flight Deck, offers a perfect blend of high-speed range capability and traveller comfort. Offering the ultimate in technology, this intrepid jet can link Geneva with Tokyo and Geneva with Sao Paulo, non-stop, with eight passengers and three to four crew aboard(i).

Confirmed Media Activities

Monday, May 20, 2013, 11:00 - 12:00
Bombardier Business Aircraft Press Conference
Hall 7 - Bombardier Booth #7011

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 10:00 - 11:00
Bombardier Business Aircraft Press Conference
Hall 7 - Bombardier Booth #7011

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 16:30 - 18:30
Customer Services Cocktail
Hall 7 - Bombardier Booth #7011


About Bombardier
Bombardier is the world's only manufacturer of both planes and trains. Looking far ahead while delivering today, Bombardier is evolving mobility worldwide by answering the call for more efficient, sustainable and enjoyable transportation everywhere. Our vehicles, services and, most of all, our employees are what make us a global leader in transportation.

Bombardier is headquartered in Montreal, Canada. Our shares are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange (BBD) and we are listed on the Dow Jones Sustainability World and North America Indexes. In the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, we posted revenues of $16.8 billion. News and information are available at bombardier.com or follow us on Twitter @Bombardier.

Notes to editors
Follow @Bombardier_Aero on Twitter to receive the latest news and updates from Bombardier Aerospace.

(i)Under certain operating conditions.

Bombardier, Bombardier Vision, Challenger, Challenger 300, Challenger 604, Challenger 605, Global, Global 6000, Learjet, Learjet 70, Learjet 75, and The Evolution of Mobility are trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries.

To view the photo associated with this press release, please visit the following link: https://media3.marketwire.com/docs/BBD-Learjet75.jpg.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Annie Cossette Bombardier Business Aircraft
+1-514-855-4388
[email protected]
Virtual press kit: www.bbapress.com
www.bombardier.com

 

Exploring the “Despicablimp”

Ray Robinson, West Coast/International Sales Manager at GlobalAir.com

   One of the many great pleasures of being located directly on the Bowman Field Airport (KLOU) is the fantastic opportunities that we have to see rare things! Spring time in the beautiful state of Kentucky means just one thing; Kentucky Derby time! The entire month of April is devoted to airshows, parties on the river, concerts, marathons, and so much more all in celebration and leading up to the first Saturday in May. This is the big day! During this time, here at Bowman field, we’ve got first row seats to all of the best action in aviation. Not only do we get the opportunity to watch planes come in and take off in preparation for the various ceremonies, but we also get opportunities to meet with and watch stunt flyers as they practice for Thunder Over Louisville, (an annual airshow/fireworks display that kicks off the Derby festival in mid-April.) Sometimes, if we’re lucky we can even catch footage of planes as they swoop in and snag the banners that they promote high above Churchill Downs. All of this is fantastic; however, our favorite parts are the special times when we get to see brand new, different and unique sides of aviation – like the Despicablimp.

   The Despicablimp is traveling across the nation promoting the summer release of “Despicable Me 2”, the animated movie starring the voices of Steve Carell, Al Pacino, Kristen Wiig and Russell Brand. Arguably, the most popular features of the movie are the Minions, which are small, yellow creatures that wear goggles and overalls. These characters are the comic relief that bring comedy to each and every moment they are on the screen. So, what better way to get the word out than with a giant floating minion?

   We spoke with blimp pilot Allan Judd to get an idea of what life with “Stuart,” the Despicablimp, was like. Surprisingly, one word that he never Judd compared his Blimp to was aircraft. “This is much more like piloting a submarine; imagine an upside-down picture with the sky as the ocean, and the land as the surface” he states.

   Judd gave us a simple 101 lesson over how the blimp works. “The helium in the envelope displaces around four tons of air – this makes it buoyant. We simply fill and empty a bladder inside the envelope, called a ballonet; this controls the balloon’s lift and pitch. This can be compared to that last bit of helium that’s added to mylar balloons that you may purchase from flower stores. It is this last bit of helium which will remove all wrinkles from the edges.” For thrust, the 150 ft. long blimp is propelled thru the air by two Lycoming 10-360 engines with additional oil coolers.

   What determines whether or not a blimp will launch? “Whether or not we can successfully bring it back to safe harbor,” says Judd. “If the weather conditions are such that we can’t hook back up to the mooring mast, then we will not be launching.” And the mooring mast is incredibly sturdy – the stakes that hold it are over 3 ft. long and are screwed deep into the ground. When the blimp is secured to it, it can withstand 100 mph winds.” If the pilot and the Mast Headsman (the man that releases and connects the blimp to the mooring mast) determine that the conditions are not good, they don’t fly.

   The Despicablimp crew includes 15 members on site, each of which have different jobs managing the day-to-day aspects of prepping the blimp including, launching and securing it to the mooring mast, and driving the equipment to the next landing spot. Much like a submarine crew, they do everything together while they are on the road. There is also another crew of 15 stationed at the company’s headquarters in Orlando, Florida. This crew handles the behind the scenes work, such as arranging hotel accommodations as well as schedules for the on-site crew.

   I would like to thank Allen Judd and the entire Despicablimp crew for taking some time with us on their busy day. Not only did we learn about the functionality and science behind the scenes, but we were actually invited to sit in the pilot’s seat and given the full tour. Plus we recorded an amazing video of the blimp taking off and circling back – make sure to watch that as well!

Don’t forget to see Despicable Me in a theater near you; due to hit the box office July 3, 2013!

For more information on the Despicablimp:

Despicablimp Command Center - www.despicablimp.com

Despicablimp Twitter feed - twitter.com/Despicablimp

Despicable Me 2 official site - despicableme.com

How Blimps Work - science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/blimp.htm

For more photography, visit our Facebook page!: www.facebook.com/GlobalAir

(Additional reporting by Keely Mick)

Jim and Matt

Allen Judd as he teaches Ray a few "Blimp 101 Fundamentals."

Jim and Matt

Meet "Stuart!"



End of content

No more pages to load