All posts tagged 'Aviation' - Page 14

Regional Corporate Pilot: via “The Pilot Slot”

   A leadership coach once spoke of growing up in Nebraska. When he spoke, he said “there are things you learn while growing up in the country that you just can't learn anywhere else.” I found that extremely fascinating; after all, a person’s roots typically tends to tell a lot about that person. Interesting fact; because of this article, I learned that many famous names have come out of Nebraska, including Fred Astaire, Marlon Brando, Johnny Carson and Larry the Cable Guy! Although I’ve not personally met with any of those people, each of them had what it takes to fight for what they wanted in life. Becoming a household name doesn’t typically happen overnight. I would like to share with you a story of one truly inspirational pilot and fine Nebraska native that is living and breathing aviation every single day.

   Jim McIrvin was born in Nebraska in 1964. He grew up on his family’s farm, went to school and played with his friends; no different than any other young boy his age. Jim was just a boy in grade school when he met a science teacher that changed his life. He never forgot this man, for he was a man who collected and built model airplanes. If that wasn’t inspiration enough, Jim’s best friend’s “Uncle Gene” was sure to push Jim over the aviation edge. Jim was in the second grade when “Uncle Gene” came into his class for career day and spoke high and wide of his job as a Coast Guard Pilot. People don’t tend to forget the days that change their lives, and for Mr. McIrvin, this had been one of those days. Years later, while the family packed things up and prepared to move off of the farm, Jim would stumble across his father’s dusty old log book from World War II. Although his father had been trained as a pilot in the war, he never had a chance to actually fly in the war. Nonetheless, Jim appreciated and respected his father for this, and so it was, aviation had officially been set in stone for Mr. Jim McIrvin. Unfortunately, as a boy, flight was nothing more than a dream for McIrvin. Jim spent most of his childhood with his head in the clouds, dreaming of a day when his feet might join him. All the while, Jim kept busy on the ground, building model airplanes of his own and farming his family’s land. While in high school, Jim applied and was accepted into an Air Force ROTC program that would eventually grant him with an opportunity to attend college in Saint Louis, Missouri at Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology; via “the pilot slot.”

   It wasn’t until 1983 however, that Jim’s feet finally met his heart and soul in the sky. He was a sophomore in college, spending his spare time in one of the various local FBO’s of the Saint Louis, where he would go to watch the planes take off and come in. One afternoon, a man flew in from out of town in his personal Bonanza aircraft and asked Jim if he would care to accompany this man to a local airplane museum. Startled at first, certainly Jim couldn’t pass on an opportunity such as this. He kindly complied and off they went into the horizon via the stranger’s Bonanza aircraft in search of the aviation museum.

   During Jim’s senior year in college, he was awarded with his second pilot scholarship; this time, Jim had been awarded with an opportunity to pursue flight training in an accredited Air Force pilot training program. However, before he would become eligible to be sent into this pilot training, the Air Force required Jim to complete a rather lengthy screening process as well as successfully accomplish his first solo flight within seven hours of dual training with an instructor. Once Jim had successfully completed this task, as well as the required screening, he would be finished with his Air Force duties until the day he graduated as an officer. Until then however, there was no was no way that Jim would be sitting around with his feet on the ground! McIrvin had begun with his private training and wasn’t planning on stopping after just one solo flight. At that point, Jim took matters into his own hands and finished his private training at the FBO with his instructor. Once Jim had successfully completed his private pilot training he began competing with the NIFA program (National Intercollegiate Flying Association) via Park's flying team; the Flying Billikens. Apparently, Jim had been affiliated with this program throughout all four years of his college career; however, he had only participated as a ground member. It wasn’t until McIrvin’s senior year that he would compete nationally in the “SAFECON” flight competition, located at Ohio State University.

   Finally in 1986, Jim McIrvin graduated from Park’s College of Engineering, and carried on into the United States Air Force. During McIrvin’s military training he flew the Cessna T-37 Tweet as well as the Northrop T-38 Talon aircraft for precisely one year. Upon graduating from this training, McIrvin went directly to the FAA in order to test for and acquire his commercial pilot’s license. At that point, Jim was sincerely in need of flight time; no worries though, Jim was headed overseas on his very first Air Force assignment flying an F-111 in Desert Storm combat. In 1991, Jim became a certified flight instructor teaching student pilots to fly military aircraft such as the F-111, F-16 and the T-38. After teaching students on the side for just one year, McIrvin received his ATP rating in 1992. In 2000, Jim decided to transition into the Air Force Reserves in order to take a very promising FO airline job working for United Airlines, flying the Boeing 737. This was fantastic experience and not to mention great flight time for Mr. McIrvin. Unfortunately, once 9/11 happened, United Airlines laid off several thousand employees for a companywide downsize movement and needless to say, Jim was one of these several thousand involved. It was because of the downsize that Jim decided to reconnect with the military on a full-time, active duty status. In 2007 Jim added his single engine sea rating as well as a multi-engine sea rating and in 2010 McIrvin became type rated to fly in the Embraer Phenom 100 as well as the Phenom 300.

   In 2008, Jim retired from the United Stated Air Force and went to fly for the newly developed flight department of The Southern Bleacher Company. With this company, Jim flew in one of two different aircraft, depending on the job; either a Socata TBM 850 or Cirrus SR22. Today however, four years later, the Southern Bleacher Company’s fleet has grown and now includes two very beautiful aircraft; an Embraer Phenom 100 as well as a Piper Malibu Mirage. Jim’s job as chief pilot is to maintain these aircraft and of course, fly them to and from regional job sites. As a hobby, McIrvin continues flight instructing on the side. He is also very involved with the Young Eagles program and he serves as mentor pilot in the Phenom aircraft.

   From a very young age Jim knew that he wanted to fly. He didn’t look at the long term things like time or cost; and he didn’t care about the expense of how he might get there. Jim knew what he wanted from life and he never took “No” for an acceptable answer. “Just because the answer was No today, does not necessarily mean it will be the same answer tomorrow, or the next day” Jim stated. Jim McIrvin enjoys being a role model and a leader in the aviation world. He encourages all young people who dream of flight, (people like me) to take that leap and never look back. McIrvin says “Don’t be afraid to ask the questions; if it’s something you want, don’t ever stop trying.” As I conclude I would like to thank Mr. Jim McIrvin for contacting me and telling me his story.
   -- Jim shared with me a specific memory that touched his heart in a very special way. Years ago, Jim was very much involved with the Young Eagles program, even more so than he currently is today. McIrvin was giving free discovery flights to the young cadets involved in the program and out of the kindness of his heart; he chose to fly these cadets in his own private aircraft. One young man in particular, by the name Matt, sought after Mr. Jim McIrvin and asked for help in acquiring his private license. Young matt had been the only student that had chased after flight lessons and his willingness to fly sparkled in his eyes. Young Matt wasn’t taking “No” for an acceptable answer. Jim greatly appreciated Matt’s drive to learn, and made a bargain. Matt was to come to the airport on a regular basis and clean Jim’s personal aircraft in exchange for flight lessons. As the story goes, Matthew completed his private and carried all the way through flight training. In 2010 Matt graduated from flight school and is now a pilot in the U.S. Air force.

   There are pilots all over the world who want to share their story and their talents with young flight-driven students. Like Jim McIrvin, these pilots hope to help in leading students down a pathway to success. In the words of Jim McIrvin, “if it’s your dream, keep after it and never let it go.”

Jim and Matt

Phenom 100 with Jim

Note from the Author: Thank you so much for taking the time to stop by and read my articles! I cannot even begin to describe how much I’ve learned in just a few short months since I started with this series. You are all such inspiring aviators and pilots, so thanks for reaching out to me with your comments and emails. I hope you enjoyed this article, now get yourselves prepared for my next article and in the meantime, keep up the awesome thoughts, comments and on-blog conversations! -As always, please feel free to message me directly with your thoughts at - [email protected]. I’d love to hear from you!

It's Twice As Good: EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2013 Adds Second Night Air Show!

OSH-2013-8
For more information, contact:
Dick Knapinski, EAA Communications
(920) 426-6523
[email protected]

Evening performances on Wednesday and Saturday in 2013

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wis. — (March 21, 2013) — The EAA AirVenture Oshkosh night air show, one of the most popular additions to “The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration” lineup over the past quarter-century, will be even bigger in 2013 with the addition of a second night show scheduled for Wednesday, July 31.

“The additional night show is being scheduled this year in response to those EAA members and AirVenture attendees who said they missed this phenomenal event because they came to Oshkosh earlier in the week,” said Jim DiMatteo, EAA’s vice president of AirVenture features and attractions. “We talked with the participating performers and they’re just as excited to have an additional opportunity to fly the twilight show here as the thousands who have enjoyed it each year.”

The inaugural EAA AirVenture night air show was in 2010 and was an instant hit, drawing tens of thousands of people to the flight line for an unmatched display of piloting skill and dazzling light in the twilight over Oshkosh. All the afternoon and night air shows at EAA AirVenture are presented by Rockwell Collins.

Among the performers already committed to both night shows at Oshkosh are:

AeroShell Aerobatic Team (T-6s)
Bob Carlton (jet sailplane)
Matt Younkin (Beech 18)
Gene Soucy (Showcat)
Steve Oliver (Super Chipmunk)
Roger Buis (Otto the Helicopter)
Rich’s Incredible Pyro (pyrotechnics)

Each of the night air shows will conclude with a thunderous fireworks display that has been termed as one of the best in the entire Midwest.

About EAA AirVenture Oshkosh
EAA AirVenture Oshkosh is “The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration” and EAA’s yearly membership convention. Additional EAA AirVenture information, including advance ticket and camping purchase, is available online at www.airventure.org. EAA members receive lowest prices on admission rates. For more information on EAA and its programs, call 1-800-JOIN-EAA (1-800-564-6322) or visit www.eaa.org. Immediate news is available at www.twitter.com/EAAupdate.

Calling all readers!: Have you heard about this elsewhere on the inter-webs? Tell us about it! We would love to hear your feedback!

NBAA Supports Sen. Moran's Amendment to Preserve Control Towers Under Sequester

Contact: Dan Hubbard, (202) 783-9360, [email protected]

Washington, DC, March 14, 2013 – The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) supports an amendment from Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS), which would halt the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA’s) plan to close a host of air traffic control towers and other facilities.

Noting the integral role of the towers in the nation’s aviation system, and the economic boost that airports with towers play in surrounding communities, NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen sent a letter to Moran in support of his amendment, noting: “It is very important to keep as many as possible in operation during these difficult economic times…The Moran amendment will ensure that citizens in every corner of the U.S. continue to have access to our national aviation system.”

Read Bolen’s March 12 letter to Sen. Moran
.

The FAA recently began developing plans for closing nearly 170 control towers and other facilities in response to budget sequestration, or across-the-board cuts to federal agencies required in deficit-reduction legislation passed by Congress in 2011. The FAA’s deadline for industry input on its tower-closure plan is today, and a final announcement of its decision regarding the closures is expected March 18.

Moran's amendment would offset the closures using savings from unobligated FAA research and capital funds provided in prior congressional appropriations bills, so that the facilities targeted for closure can remain open.

Moran plans to offer his amendment for inclusion in a comprehensive funding bill, called a “Continuing Resolution” (“CR”), which Congress is expected to consider this month. That resolution would continue funding for all federal agencies through the end of the government’s fiscal year, in the absence of congressional passage of specific appropriations bills.

Moran has been an outspoken supporter of general aviation, often highlighting the industry’s importance to the nation's economy and transportation system. He emphasized the importance of those contributions when unveiling his amendment related to the air traffic tower closures.

Moran's amendment follows a letter he joined in signing from the Kansas congressional Delegation to Department of Transportation (DOT) Secretary Ray LaHood and FAA Administrator Michael Huerta opposing the planned tower closures.

“We fear these cuts to control towers will compromise the FAA's stated mission of providing the safest, most efficient aerospace system in the world,” the letter reads, “and will put the flying public at risk, impair access to rural areas, jeopardize national and civil security missions, and cost jobs.”

This week, NBAA also wrote top transportation officials to express the business aviation community’s pressing concerns over the FAA’s tower-closure plan. "It is clear that jobs in small, medium and large towns across the country will be impacted," stated a letter signed by Bolen.

Read Bolen’s letter to the FAA in its entirety
.

# # #

Founded in 1947 and based in Washington, DC, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) is the leading organization for companies that rely on general aviation aircraft to help make their businesses more efficient, productive and successful. The Association represents more than 9,000 companies and provides more than 100 products and services to the business aviation community, including the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, the world's largest civil aviation trade show. Learn more about NBAA at www.nbaa.org.

Members of the media may receive NBAA Press Releases immediately via email. To subscribe to the NBAA Press Release email list, submit the online form

Fuller To Step Down As AOPA President And CEO

Fuller To Step Down As AOPA President And CEO
Board of Trustees to Conduct National Search for Successor

Frederick, MD -Craig L. Fuller, president and chief executive officer of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the world's largest aviation association, has notified AOPA's Board of Trustees of his intent to step down from his position and from the Board. He plans to remain in his current role until a successor is ready to assume the position. The Board will conduct a national search for his successor. Following the decision to leave AOPA, the succession process was developed by working together, said William C. Trimble III, Chairman of the Board.

Fuller, who took office January 1, 2009 and is only the fourth president of AOPA since the association's founding nearly 75 years ago, will assist with the search for a new president and the transition to a new administration.

In conveying his decision to the Board of Trustees, Fuller, 62, noted that he made a five-year commitment to AOPA when he was appointed president. As he approaches the fulfillment of that commitment, he said he is looking forward to taking on new challenges and opportunities. "I have flown since age 17, and flying has been part of my life ever since. I will always be grateful to the AOPA Board of Trustees for having given me the opportunity to serve the general aviation community and AOPA's 385,000 members in a leadership position," said Fuller. "It has been a privilege to work with my colleagues on a strong set of initiatives that have built on the decades of hard work by AOPA Trustees and members of the management team. With the end of my five-year commitment approaching, this is an appropriate time for me to consider new opportunities and allow the Board time to recruit a successor.

"The process of finding a new leader can now go forward as all of us at AOPA roll up our sleeves to fight the day to day battles that seem to keep coming our way," said Fuller. "The team will not miss a beat this year as we lay the groundwork for the future."

"During his more than four years as president of AOPA, Craig served nobly and professionally. He has advocated strongly on behalf of the general aviation community in Washington, built bridges with the other aviation associations, improved member communications and generated promising ideas for tomorrow," said Trimble. "We recognize the importance of finding a leader who can continue to inspire all of us in these challenging times. We are focused on finding a leader who shares our vision and convictions as well as the talent and capabilities necessary to achieve our goals."

Trimble, who has chaired the AOPA Board of Trustees since 2005, said the Board will form a search committee shortly and retain an executive search firm to begin looking for AOPA's new leader.

Since 1939, AOPA has protected the freedom to fly for thousands of aviators and aircraft owners. From its headquarters in Frederick Md., offices in Washington, D.C. and seven regions of the U.S., its representatives interact with local, state and federal elected officials and government representatives to ensure the safe and steady growth of general aviation. AOPA offers members a variety services, including flight planning products, safety seminars and studies and publications, as well as insurance, legal, aircraft financing and title services.

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Contact:

Katie Pribyl

301-695-2150
[email protected]

FMI: www.avweb.com
Visit: www.aopa.org

So You Think You Want To Be A Pilot: The Commercial Cargo Pilot

    Pi•lot
  • One who operates or is licensed to operate an aircraft in flight.
  • One who guides or directs a course of action for others.
  • Serving or leading as guide.
     Pilots are people too, right? They’re people who happen to venture high in the sky in search of adrenaline, speed and worldly travels. The strange part is, less than 0.1 percent of people in the world will actually take the necessary steps of action to learn to fly an aircraft; an even smaller percentage of people will become professional pilots.

    No matter how you see it, each pilot's journey is bound to begin in generally the same way, via a single piston engine aircraft. “We must walk before we can run.”

     For young Gary Katz, one flight was all it took and he was sold. Gary was young and certainly impressionable on the day of his very first flight; nonetheless, in the back seat of that dusty old Cessna aircraft, his life was changed for the better. It was because of Gary’s father that he initially became engaged in flight and it was by his father’s suggestion that he eventually enrolled into The Civil Air Patrol.
     With years came wisdom, and as Gary grew, so did his passion for flight. After college, Gary went to work for a small, locally owned airport outside of Cincinnati, Ohio. This is where he learned to fly. Once Gary completed his pilot training, he accepted a job as a flight instructor and continued logging hours and experience while he shared his newfound talent with young, ambitious pilots that came his way. A few years later Gary Katz took on a new type of piloting job where he flew cancelled checks in twin engine Cessna airplanes for a company that provided international express mail services. This was a rather enjoyable job indeed, however, the maintenance of the aircraft was subpar and that made him feel somewhat uneasy about taking long trips. Eventually Gary continued forward with his career and began flying for an airline headquartered in Orlando, Florida. Finally, in 1989 Gary hooked the fish that sank the boat and was hired to fly cargo for UPS out of Louisville, Kentucky. This time, Gary flies primarily domestic cargo in DC-8 aircraft that are all maintained superbly and very well kept. Also, due to the UPS scheduling system, Gary receives a fairly negotiable schedule that keeps him at home with his family as much as possible.
     The more I learned about the life of a commercial cargo pilot, the more excited I became. Clearly this would be a rather lofty goal, but as far as a “dream career” goes, I would venture to say the cargo pilot has a seemingly pleasurable day at work. Unfortunately, Gary is “on the road” quite frequently, and his working hours are set up quite differently than your typical 9-5 office position. Nonetheless, Gary says that he thoroughly enjoys his work; and from a student pilot’s perspective, that is very nice to hear. According to Gary, the most difficult part about his job working as a cargo pilot is the time that he must spend apart from his family, as well as the late night shifts that throw off the natural human circadian rhythm. “If that’s the most difficult thing about being a cargo pilot, then I’m in!”

     Also, of course there are certainly perks included in the life of a professional pilot. In Gary’s spare time he has taught his son to fly, passing the talent right down his family line. On weekends he takes trips with his friends and family via his personal Cessna 182. Gary has also successfully developed a volunteer organization known as The Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators. I’m far from the end on my road to discovering the inside scoop on the life of a professional pilot; but this was a fantastic start and I am feeling more inspired than ever! I can’t wait to meet and speak with my next professional pilot. Do you have a good story? I would love to hear from you! Just send me a quick email to [email protected] and tell me all about it! 

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