All posts tagged 'Aviation' - Page 9

An Aviation Movie for Every Preference

There’s nothing better than curling up with a good movie and some hot chocolate on a cold winter night. There are dozens of options if you prefer an aviation themed film, and I have categorized some of the best films into different categories based on content. I personally always love a great vintage aviation film, but sometimes I’m more in the mood for a drama or documentary. Thankfully with so many options out there, it is easy to find a film that suits your tastes.

Vintage Aviation

The Great Waldo Pepper

If you’re in the mood for biplanes, barnstorming, and aviation when it was far less regulated, you should seek out a vintage aviation film. My all-time favorite is The Great Waldo Pepper, which is currently streaming on Netflix if you have an account. This film is about a barnstormer-turned-movie star that flies in several "air circuses" during the era that more and more government regulation is occurring around aviation. He tries to make a living flying, but gets shut down several times due to breaking the new regulations. It is a great movie and worth seeing more than once!

Other examples: Those Magnificent Men and Their Flying Machines, Amelia

Airline Flight

Sully

If airliners and commercial aviation excites you the most, there are several great films about that too. Arguably one of the best aviation movies of the year, Sully follows the real-life story of the miracle of the Hudson. The forced water landing due to a bird strike was a historical moment that is beautifully retold with Tom Hanks playing Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger. It gives insight into the way that the NTSB has to investigate airline accidents, and shows how years of flying helped Sully beat the odds and have a completely successful landing.

Other Examples: Flight

Military Flight

Top Gun

Perhaps one of the most popular genres of aviation movies, military aviation boasts several classics. Top Gun has been one of the most popular aviation movies of all time since its release in 1986. The catchy songs, action-packed flight scenes, and dramatic love story make for a great film. I’m sure that more than a few Air Force and Navy hopefuls were inspired by this movie. This film is also currently available on Netflix, so you have no excuse not to watch it if you haven’t yet!

Other Examples: Red Tails

Aviation Humor

Airplane!

This genre is a little sparser than others, but there are a few good films. It goes to show that people can find humor in anything. Full of enough aviation puns to last you a lifetime, the movie Airplane! is an automatic classic and must watch for anyone who likes aviation or silly jokes. This movie is also the definitive origin of the "Surely you can’t be serious!" "I am serious… and don’t call me Shirley." joke.

Other Example: Disney/Pixar Planes

Drama/Thriller

Air Force One

Everyone loves a good thriller, and Air Force One starring Harrison Ford will keep you on the edge of your seat for the entire movie. Ford plays the role of the president who is on Air Force One when Russian Terrorists hijack the plane. His family happens to be onboard as well, and they are quickly taken as hostages. I watched this for the first time inside of a camper at AirVenture in 2013, and it has stuck with me ever since. It’s always interesting to see how characters that are trapped in an airplane with virtually no escape handle difficult situations.

Other Examples: Snakes on a Plane, Red Eye

Documentary

One Six Right

Aviation has some historical stories that are stranger and more interesting than any fiction Hollywood could think up. Documentaries about these actual events can teach you something new and lead to further investigation into other new things. I personally loved the film One Six Right. It should be required in school curriculum. The film shows how general aviation has such resounding effects on the world, as seen through the happenings at a local airport. This film was deemed so important by AOPA that they sent a complimentary copy of it to every member of congress who was a private pilot in the spring of 2005. That is saying something!

Other Example: Living in the Age of Airplanes

I hope that at least one of these films peaks your interest and inspires you to watch an aviation film this weekend! There is certainly plenty to choose from, and the classics will never get old. Let me know in the comments if you have a favorite aviation movie that I did not mention!

Using Your Skills to Overcome New Challenges

By Greg Feuerbach – Jet Service Crew Chief
Elliott Aviation

A quality maintenance team has experienced and reliable technicians who have the knowledge to understand the basics of aircraft maintenance. The challenge comes when you transfer these fundamental skills to a new airframe. Just like basic car components are similar in all makes and models, the way a manufacturer assembles them and the types of parts they use and tools required could be dramatically different. The same idea applies to airframes. As a good car mechanic can learn a new make and model, with proper training, a quality technician can understand the fundamentals while applying his skillset to a new or different aircraft.

We recently completed our first Challenger 300 96-month major inspection and delivered it squawk free. A major reason we were able to do so is because we have a solid base of good mechanics, but have key team leads that have substantial experience with the airframe. For instance, as team lead for the project, I have extensive knowledge of the airframe, spending 15 years at a Bombardier Challenger Service Center. In addition, one of our Customer Support Representatives, Andrew Nicewanner spent 18 years with both the 300 and the 600 series. This allowed us to prepare our technicians who had never touched a Challenger. In preparation, we sent many technicians to be factory trained before the inspection.

To help technicians who did not have Challenger experience, we set clear and precise instructions with illustrations for the tasks assigned each technician, along with time for review and periodic checks of their progress. In addition, we also held a five-day onsite training with Global Jet Services before the aircraft arrived.

A quality maintenance team can learn the many differences in a new airframe. Having key members with experience on that airframe, preparation before any inspections with added training, schooling, and constant communication was key in a successful inspection.

Greg Feuerbach, Elliott Aviation’s Jet Service Center Crew Chief has 38 years of maintenance experience with 21 years in the Air Force working on F-4E Phantoms, F-16 A,B,C,&D Fighting Falcons, and the A/OA-10A Warthog. Prior to joining Elliott Aviation, he worked for 15 years at the Bombardier Challenger Service Center in Tucson, Arizona on all models of the Challenger 600 and 300 series aircraft. Thirteen of those years were as Lead Technician. In addition, he is also qualified to perform engine operations and taxi all models of Challenger aircraft.

Top 5 Favorite Airports

Ever get that exciting feeling when you walk into an airport?  I know I do!  The excitement of jetting off to some other part of the country is often enough to keep me awake, despite that 5am flight.   Today I’ll cover my top 5 favorite airports and hopefully it’ll get you daydreaming about your next big trip.

#5:  Nantucket Memorial Airport (ACK)

Nantucket Memorial Airport is situated on the beautiful Nantucket Island, about 30 miles from Boston.   Normally, I probably wouldn’t have ever been to the East coast except for vacation, but that all changed last summer.  The airport gets extremely busy in the summer due to airline and General Aviation traffic, so they hire many seasonal workers. 

UND put up the ad on their website and I applied to work full-time in the Fixed Based Operator (FBO).  It was a great job, and I lived in a beach house the airport owned while working there over the summer.  The beach was very picturesque and I got to bike to work every day.  I wouldn’t trade that experience for anything, and that’s why Nantucket Memorial Airport is #5!

#4: San Antonio Int’l Airport (SAT)

San Antonio holds a special place in my heart.  Located in southwest Texas, this little gem of an airport is like my second home.  If it weren’t for a special someone, I might have never been able to experience Texas.  It’s located conveniently close to downtown San Antonio and home to some notable corporate aviation departments like Valero, Pace Foods, and H.E.B. 

Photo courtesty of San Antonio International Airport

You know you’re not in the Midwest any longer when you walk down that jet bridge and feel the heat and humidity.


#3: Sydney Kingsford Smith Int’l Airport (SYD)

www.dailytelegraph.com.au

Sydney Airport is the one of the few international airports I’ve had the opportunity to visit and my favorite Australian airport.  Situated in downtown Sydney, this airport hosts some spectacular views of one of Australia’s most urban cities.  Oftentimes, if you’re traveling to Australia from the U.S., your first stop will be at Sydney where you will clear Customs and head over to the domestic terminal.

When I originally traveled to Australia about 4 years ago, I was on my way to Brisbane, a city on the Gold Coast (east side of Australia).  We had to clear Customs, pick up our bags, exit the international terminal and take a shuttle to the domestic terminal a few miles away.  It turns out that there were more than 1 jumbo jet that got into Customs at the same time and we ended up missing our domestic connection.  However, Qantas Airlines has some pretty amazing employees and they rebooked us on the next available flight. 

The terminals are very white and sleek looking.  The airport feels newer than most U.S. airports and the hustle and bustle is amazing.  Many Australians travel by air as it’s not exactly easy to drive between large cities.   In addition, most Australians live within 50 kilometers (about 30 miles) of the coast, so it’s often faster and cheaper to fly.  Security is a little different in Australia and when I asked if I should take off my shoes and belt, they laughed at me!  I’m guessing they don’t have the same security issues we have here in the U.S.

#2: Flying Cloud Municipal Airport (FCM)

#2 is the airport of many firsts for me.  My first flying lesson, my first solo, and where I earned my Private Pilot’s License.  I also got my first aviation-related job there working for a small flying school.  That flying school turned out to be a great place because I met a lot of my flying family there.  We still all hang out when we can – one of the couples in our group even got married in a hanger there! 

Flying Cloud is home to a lot of General Aviation and the pilots there are a pretty tight group.  It’s also home to the Wings of The North Organization that has an aviation museumand hosts AirExpo every summer on the airport’s property.  Viking Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol has a hanger there and many flight schools call Flying Cloud their home.  

#1: Minneapolis-St Paul Int’l Airport (MSP)

www.lakenwoods.com

Minneapolis-St Paul is #1 because it’s the first international airport I ever traveled from.  I flew from there to Alaska with my dad, to Florida to visit my brother, to San Diego to connect to Australia, and many other destinations.   This airport is exciting and nostalgic all at once – it could mean a new adventure, or returning to home sweet home.  There is something special about being connected to the world through just one location – it never ceases to fascinate me… And that’s why Minneapolis will always be #1.  So, what's your #1 airport?

Top 5 Jobs in Aviation (That are not Professional Pilot)

Since I was a young girl and I took my first airplane flight, I knew that I wanted to spend the rest of my life associated with this wonderful world of flying machines. My immediate action after this flight was to decide I would be a professional pilot. After all, in my young mind that was the only job that would let me be around airplanes and airports all day. Since then, I have pushed on with single-mindedness towards earning my flight ratings. First private, then instrument, now I am building hours towards taking my commercial pilot checkride.

However, he more that I dig deep into the world of professional flight, the more I see that it is certainly not just the pilots that play an important role. In reality, they play just as important of a role of any of the hundreds of other personnel that run airports and flight operations daily. These jobs are not given the "rock star" persona that the general public tends to give pilots, and I believe that is a terrible misunderstanding.

In my Crew Resource Management class at my flight university we have been discussing a lot about what exactly the definition of "crew" is. Is it just pilot flying and pilot monitoring? Is it also ATC? If ATC is included, wouldn’t maintenance and dispatch also make the cut? A commercial flight operation could not possibly happen without the combined efforts of all of these resources.

I want to give a brief overview of what I consider to be five of the most important "crew" resources for every commercial flight. I would also like to encourage every young aviator out there to take a step back and appreciate all of the supporting people that work to make these operations happen. They are all "rock stars" in their own right and work very hard to keep the skies safe and efficient.

Air Traffic Controller

Picture this scenario: It is a sunny and beautiful day at a medium-sized airport that supports both commercial and general aviation traffic. Everyone suddenly gets the urge to stretch their wings and spend a few hours in the air. At the same time, routine commercial flights are coming and going at breakneck speed to accommodate travelers. As a controller, it is your job to perfectly orchestrate the dozens of aircraft that are in your airspace at any given moment. You also have to take into consideration the type, speed, altitude, and intention of each plane. Air traffic controllers have an extremely difficult job, that when done well is not noticed.

Dispatcher

A dispatcher is in charge of organizing a large portion of the logistical information for a flight. In the U.S. and Canada they also share legal responsibility for any aircraft they are assigned with the pilot in command. Dispatchers are trained to ATP standards, and must have extensive knowledge of meteorology and aviation regulations in general. A dispatcher typically handles between 10 and 20 aircraft at the same time, and must monitor each of them to ensure safe flight operations.

Aircraft Maintenance Worker

If aircraft were not maintained to the high standard that they are today, there would be twice as many accidents happening during daily flight operations. Aircraft maintenance technicians are highly skilled in mechanics, computer systems, and a whole host of other practical expertise. They spend weeks memorizing the complex systems of each aircraft that they work on. They are not afraid to get dirty, and keep thousands of aircraft flying every day.

Management

With all of these moving parts, there has to be some sort of management in place to assure that everything is running smoothly. That is where the managers, administrators, HR workers or "higher-ups" come into play. They know the business side of aviation, and often incorporate their personal aviation knowledge into their managerial methods. These are the people that help to keep the business going when things get tough.

Flight Attendant

No list of important aviation jobs would be complete without mention of flight attendants. These hard working crewmembers deal directly with the general public for hours every day. They travel the world just as much as the pilots do, and have to be wise and patient when handling any issues caused by passengers onboard. They must be friendly but assertive, constantly holding a professional demeanor. The life of a flight attendance is not glamorous, but it sure can be fun.

This list does not scratch the surface of all the types of jobs available in the aviation industry. I am sure that if you thought of almost any job, there is an equivalent job in the aviation industry. Keep an open mind when looking towards your future career endeavors, and always do what you love! We have a great list of job search resources available on the GlobalAir.com Aviation Directory.

Big News from the Flying Musicians

Flying Musicians Assn

The Flying Musicians Association is again the proud recipient of a 2015 Wolf Aviation Fund grant to assist in strengthening the bonds between aviation and music in the FMA's programs that enhance outreach and education.

"We have re-focused our efforts of sharing our passions (aviation & music) with others through our outreach to inspire, educate, encourage and now assist youth (& adults) in growing through aviation and music." Says FMA President/CEO John Zapp.

Since 1992 the Wolf Aviation Fund has awarded special grants for efforts supporting and promoting general aviation. For example, among the more than 350 previous recipients is Sandra Campbell, in flying helmet and goggles, performing for students "Follow Your Dreams," a stage recreation of the exciting story of Bessie Coleman, the first African-American woman to win her wings as an aviator. Another small seed grant to School Superintendent Gordon Schimmel eventually resulted in a million dollar project creating and distributing a wonderful "Inventing Flight" Wright Brothers curriculum with videos and teachers guides to school systems across the United States. Other grants supported community outreach, technological development, airfield preservation, effective networking, organizational development, and inspiring the next generation.

Additionally, the Flying Musicians Association has announced that once again members will be on the ramp at each AOPA Fly-In across the country. FMA encourages all pilot / musicians and friends to participate. "This is about outreach!" says John Zapp, CEO FMA. "We want all who have a love of music to join us as we liven up the ramp while inspiring, encouraging, educating and now assisting folks to grow through aviation and music. Just as a pilot certificate is a certificate to learn, being a musician requires constant learning, practicing and performing. The AOPA Fly-Ins are a wonderful way for members to reunite across the country."

AOPA Fly-Ins will have something for everyone. Spend a Saturday with AOPA participating in aviation activities, exploring exhibits and seminars, enjoying a couple of meals, music and building relationships.

Look for FMA members set up on the ramp at the following locations:

  • 6/6 Frederick, MD (KFDK),
  • 8/22 Minneapolis, MN (KANE)
  • 9/26 Colorado Springs, CO (KCOS)
  • 10/10 Tullahoma, TN (KTHA)

Visit the FMA website for more information and to contact the FMA coordinator to participate.

About the Flying Musicians Association, Inc:

The Flying Musicians Association (FMA) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization of pilots who are musicians, spanning the globe, proficiency levels and genres. The goal is to share our passions in order to inspire, educate, encourage and assist others by creating enthusiasm and promoting personal growth in aviation and music. "Pilot Musicians sharing their passion while encouraging and educating youth (& adults) in the science and art of aeronautics and music."

End of content

No more pages to load