All posts tagged 'Aviation News' - Page 10

ELTs on 121.5 MHz could be banned by FCC

 

The FCC last week issued a report that would ban emergency locator transmitters that operate at 121.5 MHz, in a decision that could affect thousands of GA aircraft.

The abolition of the devices, approved by the FAA, would take place in August.

The FCC said if the 121.5 ELTs were not available, aircraft operators will migrate to 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs monitored by satellite. The assumptive posture is that satellite monitoring would make the devices more effective in search and rescue.

The AOPA spoke out against the decision yesterday, calling it costly and unnecessary.

“The FCC is making a regulatory change that would impose an extra cost on GA operators, without properly communicating with the industry or understanding the implications of its action,” said Rob Hackman, AOPA Vice President of Regulatory Affairs.  

Sound off below and let us know how this regulatory decision could affect you and whether or not you think it's the right move.

FAA / DOT lays out NextGen plan details

 

The Transportation Department today issued its guidelines to manufacturers for NextGen implementation.

“Today's regulations set clear performance requirements for the electronics that will allow aircraft to be tracked with greater precision and accuracy. And by 2020, all aircraft flying over the United States will be broadcasting an ADS-B signal,” states an announcement on Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood’s departmental blog.  “ADS-B will allow pilots to get the same information as air traffic controllers and see the same things on their screens. Pilots will know where aircraft are located and how close one plane is to another. They'll have a clearer picture of what’s happening in the air or on the ground--even in low visibility.”

Read the blog entry here.

Or check out the entire implementation plan in PDF form here.

The tightrope of security and spending


Courtesy of the Defense Department

Certainly, a large part of aviation innovation, and of the aviation industry itself, derives from the American military. Anyone enjoy that GPS stuff lately?

An editorial in the USA Today last week echoes what has become a growing sentiment of Defense Secretary Robert Gates, a holdover from the Bush administration largely credited for righting the ship in Iraq, to limit military spending and to cut into rank-and-file bureaucracy.

Gates has pushed in recent years for cuts in parts of the Defense budget, something rarely seen from a Pentagon leader during active conflict.  His reasoning is often this: The military strength held by the United States overshadows that any other nation, and in the case of the next-largest armies, many belong to allies.

Fighting the global war on terror does not always necessitate billion-dollar machinery, his logic says.

Gates has railed to trim fat from various branches that squabble for slices of the hundreds of billions of dollars available each year in the Defense budget, the second largest expenditure behind Social Security.

Often, a general of one military branch lobbies for the same money as another. For instance, when the Army insisted upon up-armored Humvees so more soldiers could survive IED blasts in Afghanistan and Iraq, similar requests came from the Air Force for UAVs and expanding fighter jet programs.

The Pentagon, at Gates’ urging, capped production of the F-22 last year. However, another recent request of his to curtail a similar program went unheard by lawmakers.

The House Armed Services Committee passed legislation to award GE a contract to compete with Pratt & Whitney building engines for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (pictured above), which is expected to cost $113 million per plane.

The USA Today notes that the most ardent in Congress who backed the plan without approval from the Defense Secretary came from districts home to GE facilities. At home, such a vote for a Congress member means creating or saving jobs, regardless of the true defense needs.

"Does the number of warships we have and are building really put America at risk when the U.S. battle fleet is larger than the next 13 navies combined, 11 of which belong to allies and partners? Gates asked in a recent speech. "Is it a dire threat that by 2020, the United States will have only 20 times more advanced stealth fighters than China?"

In today’s times, there is a difficult balance for politicians and the non-partisan civil service workers who carry out the laws they pass. That balance spans between creating jobs, leashing government spending and defending our country. Each is important, but drawing lines is hard.

Many times, the simple solution is not the smart solution, but one can just as easily say that the other way around, too.  Weigh in below and let us know what you think.

Thanks to our friends at CFM Jet for tweeting the editorial.

 

Aviation News Rundown: India crash update, near-miss incidents scrutinized further

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The Associated Press reports this morning that Saturday’s Air India crash at an airport in Mangalore may have been caused by pilot error. A Boeing 737 overran a runway and slid into a ravine, killing 158 of 166 crewmembers and passengers.

The NTSB sent a team of investigators to cooperate in determining the cause of the India crash, deadliest in that country in more than a decade. A report from an Indian news agency says ‘nothing was wrong’ with the airport, which has a tabletop runway. Airport officials said pilots certified to fly into Mangalore are well aware of its conditions. Weather reportedly was clear and calm.

The Wall Street Journal reports that federal regulators are stepping up investigation efforts following a recent spike of near misses. The FAA has looked into more than a half-dozen incidents in the past half year, according to the WSJ article.

Could this become the Hyundai or Kia of the sky?  Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) expects to complete its first KC-100 light piston aircraft by the end of the year with deliveries beginning in 2013. The company hopes to receive certification in the U.S. and Europe for the four-seater.

Finally, it was a rough weekend for two pilots in two parts of the country in separate incidents.

Police arrested an Arkansas pilot after landing on a beach near Savanna, Ga. What began as a pleasure trip for Mark Jensen and his mother ended with his arrest. He now faces charges of reckless conduct and operating a motorized craft on the beach.

In Centennial, Colo., pilot Richard Steinmeir could not get the engine on his Cessna 182 started, so he attempted to start the prop manually. It fired up sure enough. The Skylane became a runaway plane on the airfield. Steinmeir suffered minor injuries attempting to stop it. The Cessna flipped over after traveling about 1,000 feet. The aircraft was a total loss.    

Aviation News Rundown: NTSB investigates fire, FAA reviewing ATC at Houston's Hobby Airport

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The video above is from Dude Perfect, the same group of guys at Texas A&M that threw a basketball into a goal from the top of a football stadium. This time they took to the air for what probably was an equally challenging shot.

 

Links to news stories are at the bottom of the post, but first we relay this release from the NTSB, which is investigating a fire on a Boeing 757 that caused the plane to divert 30 minutes into its flight.

 

In its continuing investigation of a fire aboard a Boeing 757 that diverted to Dulles Airport (IAD) enroute to the Los Angeles International airport (LAX) from New York’s John F. Kennedy International airport (JFK), the National Transportation Safety Board has developed the following factual information:

 

On Sunday, May 16, 2010, about 9:17 pm (EDT) the pilots on United Airlines flight 27, a Boeing 757, N510UA, noted a strong acrid smell and observed smoke from the Captain's lower front windshield.  The incident occurred about 30 minutes into the flight while the aircraft was level at 36,000 feet MSL. On board the aircraft were 7 crewmembers and 105 passengers.

 

The Captain and First Officer reported that they donned their oxygen masks and smoke goggles immediately after observing the smoke and fire. The Captain then gave control of the airplane to the First Officer and discharged a halon fire extinguisher.

 

The smoke and fire dissipated but then re-ignited. The Captain obtained a second bottle from the Purser.  The fire remained extinguished after this second

bottle was discharged. At approximately 500 feet MSL on final approach to Runway19L at IAD, the Captain’s windshield cracked. The landing was uneventful. The airplane cleared the runway, after which ARFF (Aircraft Rescue Firefighting) entered the aircraft to check for residual heat and fire. None was found and the airplane was towed to the gate for deplaning. There were no evacuation and no injuries to the flight crew or passengers.

 

Preliminary examination of the cockpit area revealed that the inner pane of the Captain’s windshield had cracked. One of the five terminal blocks attached to the inside of the lower left windshield was consumed by fire and the portion of the wire harness associated with this terminal block was significantly damaged by fire. There was significant sooting and paint peeling to the left hand side of the windshield airframe support.

 

The Captain’s windshield was moved and will be examined by Board investigators at the manufacturer.

 

Two previous windshield fire events on B757-200 aircraft prompted the NTSB to issue Safety Recommendation A-07-50 https://www.ntsb.gov/recs/letters/2007/A07_49_50.pdf.  The Safety Board investigators will look closely at the recovered hardware to determine if this latest event is related.

 

Other news worth noting:

A second near miss at Houston’s Hobby Airport (HOU) has led to the FAA launching an investigation into how ATC is handled there.

Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShip Two has flown to its launch altitude of 51,000 feet, pressurizing and powering up for the first time. How much longer until there is a single-engine Piper than can reach the moon?

Finally, be sure to check out the Google homepage today, which honors Pac-Man’s 30th birthday by altering its logo into a level of ghosts and power pellets that you can play. (Press the button to the right of the search button to get extra credits or to challenge a friend in two-player mode.)

The people at Google are the second-smartest group on the Web, right behind your friends here at GlobalAir.com.

TGI Fly-Day!

 

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