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Boeing To Offer BBJ Version Of 737 MAX

Article By: John Morris
Source: Aviation Week

Responding to strong interest from customers, Boeing Business Jets is launching a VIP version of the 737-8 from its new MAX range.

The BBJ MAX 8 will have the fuel-efficient CFM International Leap-1B engines and Boeing advanced technology winglets, coupling the BBJ2-sized cabin of the 737-8 with a more than 14% improvement in range.

“We’re taking the increased efficiency of the [737-8] and turning it into a VIP aircraft with 600-700 miles more range with the same fuel,” says BBJ president Steve Taylor. “This is a radical step improvement, driven by an increased range that opens up many more city pairs.” Range will be some 6,325 nm. for a typical four-passenger VIP mission with NBAA IFR reserves, he notes.

“We anticipate the BBJ MAX 8 will be a very strong seller as a VIP aircraft and will likely capture a larger share of the market because it’s the right combination of performance, space and comfort,” says Taylor.

He expects initial sales will be to existing customers, a number of whom want to trade up from their BBJ1s that are in some cases approaching 15 years in service. Compared to the “regular” BBJ “which we jokingly call ‘the light twin,’” says Taylor, the BBJ MAX 8 will offer a 19-ft.-longer cabin and three times the cargo capacity – as does the current BBJ2 version.

The BBJ1 is based on the 737-700, while the BBJ2 is based on the -800. Availability of the BBJ MAX 8 will likely be about six aircraft a year, the same as today, as that’s the traditional number that Boeing Commercial Airplanes allows to be drawn from its airline production line. Boeing has firm orders for nearly 900 737 MAX family aircraft; first delivery is scheduled for 2017.

VIP versions of the shorter 737-7 and longer 737-9 are also being considered, says Taylor.

Boeing Starts Building First 777 at New Rate

Article by: Gregory Polek
Brought to you by: AINONLINE

Boeing on Tuesday began building the first 777 at the highest rate ever for any of its twin-aisle models, the company said today. The rate of 8.3 airplanes per month amounts to a nearly 20-percent increase over the previous rate of seven per month.

Assembly mechanic Ryan Hoover monitors 777 drilling progress of the Flex Track on his laptop computer. Flex Track fuselage drilling equipment consists of numerically controlled drill machines riding on flexible tracks that attach to the exterior of the fuselage skin with vacuum cups. (Photo: Boeing)

Workers loaded into position the first part—the lower lobe of the 777’s aft fuselage—for assembly under the new rate in its factory in Everett, Washington.

“The preparation the team has done for this historic rate increase has been comprehensive from floor to ceiling,” said Scott Fancher, 777 vice president and general manager. “We’ve hired and trained hundreds of additional employees and the efforts of the team to get us to this point have been simply outstanding,” he said.

Boeing has applied new technologies to achieve the highest production rate the Everett plant has seen. Flex-track drilling machines in the 777 body and wings area along with automated spray-painting equipment have increased productivity and improved quality and safety, according to the company.

Boeing plans to deliver the airplane, a 777 Freighter, to Korean Air in February. Since the program’s inception, 62 customers from around the world have ordered 1,380 of the airplanes, 1,049 of which have entered service.

History In The Making For Ms. "Memphis Belle"


 
 

“We Used To Call It Luck” - Wayne Tabor

         On a non-stop flight from Brazil to Africa, Wayne Tabor is 21 years old. He is riding on the right side of the Boeing B-17, alert at all times because their carrier is under attack. He is a waist gunner and completely exposed as his squadron is rapidly approaching enemy boarders. He will complete 30 missions in a matter of 72 days averaging out to a rugged 6 missions per day over Nazi occupied Europe. Everything seems to move at the speed of light until you hear a “THUMP,” and then another “THUMP” all at once you realize, “these guys are trying to kill us!” Brace yourself as the enemy aircraft approaches you at 400 mph, too fast to rebut the blow; too fast to shoot down. “But fighting doesn’t solve anything” says Tabor “More than 26,000 lives were lost, 26,000 stories were never told. It’s just not worth it.”

          Tabor’s squadron eventually completed so many missions that they were grounded. Wayne Tabor stepped up and out of that Boeing B-17 and he did not return. That all changed September 24, 2012 when 93 year old Wayne Tabor made his way to Clark County airport and ventured back on to this aircraft after 72 years. “It brought back a lot of really good memories!” he stated with sheer certainty. “Whenever you watch television now-a-days, you see all of these crazy reality shows! THIS he said, while pointing to the B-17; fighting a war in this aircraft is the ultimate reality.”

         Upon meeting the pilot of this novel aircraft I quickly learned of the true value that has been invested here. The Pilot’s name was Mr. Ray Fowler; turns out he is an extremely successful and well rounded pilot. Mr. Fowler has been flying B-17 aircraft for 12 years now and everyday is a new adventure. “It never gets old” he declares. This beautiful four engine aircraft belongs to a 501(c)(3) non-profit flying museum known as The Liberty Foundation. Any funds that are generated immediately go back into this aircraft, simply offsetting the aircraft’s high cost of maintenance. The mere interest of the people is what keeps this aircraft alive and on tour. Thanks to the prevailing interests and generous donations of aviators throughout our country, this historic aircraft is still in flight today. Without the help of others, the Memphis Belle would surely be silenced and permanently placed in a museum.

         The Liberty Foundation’s Memphis Belle is in fact, one of only 13 remaining B-17’s that still fly today, as most of them were lost in European combat during the war. Lucky for us, this particular “Memphis Belle” was built toward the end of the war and never personally experienced any combat. It has however been painted to exactly match the original, historic “Memphis Belle” B-17 that flew countless missions with the 91st bomb group of the mighty 8th Air force; the first B-17 to complete 25 missions. Interestingly enough, The Liberty Foundation’s Memphis Belle happens to be the very same Memphis Belle that was hired for the filming of the Memphis Belle movie in England, 1989.

         The Liberty Foundation’s World War II Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress “Memphis Belle” is taking to the skies over Louisville, Kentucky on its first ever national tour. The Liberty Foundation’s B-17 is now on tour providing visitors with an exciting opportunity to take a step through time and learn more about the men and women who gave so much to protect our country. The Memphis Belle will be on tour for the next few weeks, making flight “missions” possible, without being shot down from the sky (we hope). With each “Mission” curious aviators will be invited to take wing in this historic aircraft where participants will receive a pre-flight safety briefing that contains historical significance of the aircraft as well as a spectacular scenic air tour around the city. During this flight, passengers will be encouraged to move freely about the cabin in order to enjoy the unique opportunity of visiting the various positions of a combat crew.

         Over the next few weeks the B-17 flight experience will also be available in the Indianapolis, Indiana, followed by St. Louis, Missouri, and Memphis, Tennessee. Public flights will begin in the mornings, followed by ground tours in the afternoon; the hours of operation are from 10am to 5pm each day. Your “mission” will take roughly 45 minutes to complete with approximately half an hour in flight. B-17 flights are $410.00 for Liberty Foundation members and $450.00 for all non-members. Passengers can become a Liberty Foundation Member for $40 and will in turn receive the member discount for all family and friends.

This is your invitation to take part in this upcoming weekend’s mission. The Liberty Foundation’s Boeing B-17 Memphis Belle will be in the Louisville, Kentucky area September 29 – 30, 2012 and it will be located at the Clark County air port in Sellersburg, Indiana. Have you gone for a flight in this aircraft previously? Tell us about it in a comment below! We would love to hear your stories!

Clark County Airport (KJVY)
Aircraft Specialists FBO
6005 Propeller Lane
Sellersburg, IN 47172


Call 918-340-0243 and schedule your flight today! To view the full schedule: follow - https://www.libertyfoundation.org/schedule.html

Boeing Delivers First BBJ 747-8 with Aeroloft System

Article by: Chad Trautvetter
FMI: www.ainonline.com

Yesterday Boeing delivered a Boeing Business Jet 747-8 with the first Greenpoint Technologies Aeroloft system, which provides an extra 393 sq ft of cabin space (for a total of 5,179 sq ft) via the addition of a loft area above the main cabin between the upper deck and tail. It was installed by Boeing Global Transport & Executive Systems in Wichita.


The Aeroloft features eight private sleeping berths and a changing room. According to BBJ president Steve Taylor, “The Aeroloft is one of the more innovative and exciting projects on which we’ve collaborated with Greenpoint. We’re certain all the BBJ 747-8 customers receiving the Aeroloft will be thrilled with [it].” Two more BBJ 747-8s with the Aeroloft system are scheduled to be delivered by year-end.

After a ceremony in Wichita with the airplane’s undisclosed customer, Taylor and BBJ chief pilot Rene Gonzales flew the BBJ 747-8 to Lufthansa Technik in Hamburg, Germany, for completion of its interior. The quad-jet arrived today in Hamburg, and Lufthansa Technik has already started completions work. The BBJ is scheduled to enter service in mid-2014.

To date, said Boeing Business Jets, nine BBJ 747-8s have been sold to head-of-state customers.

(Image Credit: www.ainonline.com)

Boeing 787 Engine Failure Sparks Fire at Charleston Airport

Article by: Gregory Polek
Brought to you by: AINONLINE

Another Boeing 787 engine problem—this time involving a General Electric GEnx turbofan in an airplane destined for Air India—sparked a grass fire at Charleston International Airport during a pre-flight test on Saturday, forcing the airport to close its main runway for more than an hour. The contained engine failure has prompted an investigation by the NTSB, Boeing and GE, maker of the engine now in service with Japan Airlines on four 787s.

Evidence so far points to a failure in the “back end” of the engine, specifically in the area of the low-pressure turbine. “GE Aviation continues to work with the NTSB and Boeing to determine the cause of Saturday’s incident during a ground-test run in Charleston on a newly built 787,” said the engine company in a statement sent to AIN. “GE is working aggressively to move the engine involved in the incident to a GE facility for an investigative tear-down.”

The incident involved the second of three 787s that have rolled off Boeing’s new assembly line in Charleston, South Carolina. It came roughly a week after Japan’s All Nippon Airways had to ground its five Rolls-Royce Trent 1000-powered 787s following the manufacturer’s discovery of corrosion in a crown gear within an external gearbox during product development testing.

ANA has since returned four of its five airplanes to service, and plans to redeploy the fifth early this week.

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