All posts tagged 'Boeing' - Page 3

February is a big month for Boeing first flights

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February is a big month for first flights at the Boeing Co. The aircraft maker, 41 years ago today, first flew its iconic Boeing 747 jumbo jet, whose legend rests among the biggest rock stars of commercial airlplanes. (Hat tip to Avtips, which earlier today tweeted the YouTube video embedded above.)

Today also marks a year and a day since Boeing first flew its 747-8, helping mark the 40th anniversary of the original 7-4.

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(Read more on why Boeing dubbed its commercial jets with 7_7 model IDs.)

Still, we can go even further back in history to find dozens of first flights and other notable moments in aviation history that occurred at Boeing in February. The list below comes from the log book history on the company’s web site.  Let us know in the comments which is your favorite Boeing moment.

 

1921
Feb. 24: The first wholly Douglas-designed, Douglas-built aircraft, The Cloudster, makes its first flight. It is the first airplane to lift a useful load exceeding its own weight.

1933
Feb. 1: The last Boeing biplane designed and built in Seattle, the Model 236 (XF6B-1), based on the F4B/P-12 series, makes its first flight.

1939
Feb. 20: The Douglas DC-5 makes its first flight. Only 12 are built, five as commercial DC-5 transports and seven as R3D military transports.

1942
Feb. 14: The Douglas C-54 Skymaster makes its first flight. Designed as the DC-4, it is adapted for military use. During the war Skymasters complete 79,632 transoceanic flights with only three ditchings, one of which was a test.
Feb. 26: The luxurious Boeing Stratoliners are stripped of their civilian finery and pressed into military service as C-75s. The first flights carry antitank ammunition and medical supplies to British forces in Libya.

1946
Feb. 15: The military prototype of the Douglas DC-6, the YC-122, makes its first flight.

1952
Feb. 18: The first North American AJ-2 Savage bomber flies.

1958
Feb. 28: The first Douglas Thor-Agena rocket launches Discoverer 1, the first photo reconnaissance satellite and the first satellite to enter polar orbit.

1962
Feb. 20: In the first orbital flight of a McDonnell-built Mercury spacecraft, John Glenn becomes the first American to orbit the Earth.

1963
Feb. 27: The first flight of Hughes OH-6A Cayuse light observation helicopter

1965
Feb. 25: The Douglas DC-9 twinjet airliner makes its first flight.

1972
February: The first Boeing AWACS plane, a modified 707-320B, makes its first flight.

1982
Feb. 19: The Boeing 757-200 makes its first flight.

1987
Feb. 19: The Boeing E-6A TACAMO prototype flies for the first time.

1989
Feb. 14: The first McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket launches the Navstar II-1 global positioning satellite, designed by Rockwell.

1993
Feb. 22: The McDonnell Douglas MD-90 commercial transport makes its first flight.

1997
Feb. 9: The first Next-Generation Boeing 737, a 737-700, makes its first flight.

2001
Feb. 15: The 757 Special Freighter makes its first flight.

2003
Feb. 24: The 777-300ER completes its first flight.

2005
Feb. 14: Two Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems (J-UCAS) Boeing X-45As perform their first simulated combat mission, eliminating two simulated pop-up ground threats.
Feb. 15: The first 777-200LR Worldliner, the world's longest range commercial airplane is rolled out in Everett, Wash. It can carry 301 passengers up to 9,420 nautical miles.
Feb. 24: Boeing officials and Italian Air Force customers roll out the first KC-767A advanced aerial refueling tanker in Wichita.

2008
Feb. 24: Boeing, Virgin Atlantic and GE Aviation conduct the first commercial aviation flight using a sustainable biomass-to-liquid fuel mixed with traditional kerosene-based jet fuel. The fuel blend includes oils from Babassu nuts extracted from indigenous Brazilian plants, and coconuts from the Philippines.

Boeing 787 tests GE next-gen engine (via Flightglobal)

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Boeing today tested a 787 powered by General Electric’s next-generation composite engine.

GEnx-1B64 engines in a four-hour flight.

Flightglobal reports that this is the fifth Boeing 787 aircraft to be tested. Royal Air Maroc will deploy the 787-GEnx platform starting in early 2011.

The composite 787 is expected make its first commercial flight, powered by Rolls Royce Trent 1000 engines, for Japan’s All Nippon Airways by the end of this year.

Aviation News Rundown: 89-year-old takes a flight, Japan airport works to ease flight regulations

AIN reported yesterday that a business-market survey for May, performed by UBS Investment Research, showed the corporate jet market holding steady. Industry-specific business conditions in general continue to swing upward as consumer interest rebounds. However, stagnant jet sales inventories dampen the climb. Used jet prices are stabilizing but continue to be well short of peak marks.

Another piece from AIN quotes Brian Foley Associates in saying that as the U.S. Dollar recovers, GA aircraft buyers will shift from non-North American buyers to a more-balanced mix of buyers.

Aviation Week reports that Dornier will assemble its Seastar CD2 amphibian outside of Montreal. Officials at the company, based in Florida, cited governmental support for the aviation industry, from the municipal to the national level, and the skilled labor pool in the area, helped finalized the decision to locate 250 jobs there.

In Japan, government officials are working to make the nation’s aviation regulations more friendly so more business jets land there. The country’s tourism ministry estimates that corporate flights to Japanese airports have dropped by about 4,000 annually in recent years.

The image above comes from AntiqueAirfield.com. Although it looks Photoshopped, it certainly is not. The snapshot places Boeing’s history in a single frame, as the Boeing 40 and Boeing 787 share the sky. Visit the link to see more images from the flight, as well as a behind-the-scenes pictorial showing how the shots were taken. Thanks to our friends at AirPigz.com for posting this on their site and Twitter account.

Would you like to see how youthful a flight in a single-piston aircraft can make an 89-year-old woman become? Check out this link from the Yamhill Valley (Oregon) News Register. A local program for seniors provides a chance to enjoy delayed dreams or rekindle distant memories.

In this case, Marion Field had not been in an airport in what probably was decades until Ageless Dreams arranged a plane ride for her. Her unbridled excitement shines throughout the story. One of the best quotes: “I’m gonna enjoy myself, you bet your boots.”

Aviation News Rundown: Tornado chasing UAV, Travolta's dogs killed at airport


Photo courtesy of Jaunted.com, widely distributed on the Web

One of the biggest stories in aviation today is the third nomination of a potential TSA chief from the Obama administration. We run down links to various outlets’ coverage here.

In what has to be one of the coolest technological feats in aviation recently, tornado chasers from the University of Colorado flew an unmanned aircraft into a super-cell thunderstorm. The byproduct of this will hopefully be better research of how life-threatening storms are formed without putting researchers into harm’s way.

Part of the reason folks chase such storms has to be the thrill of it. Yet controlling a UAV through massive downbursts has its own enticements, too.

In a sad piece of aviation news, two dogs owned by actor and pilot John Travolta were killed last week by a service vehicle at Bangor International Airport (BGR). Travolta owns a home off the Maine coast.

In the world of business aviation, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week runs through an intriguing list of news tidbits, noting that NATA and others are not happy with GA having only one representative on the DOT aviation panel. Read that, along with news from Hawker Beechcraft, Korean Aerospace and GE Aviation here.

Boeing patted itself on the back this week for reducing CO2 emissions at U.S. facilities by 31 percent since 2002. The company seeks to add to this number with the deployment of its 787s and 747-8 series.

Finally, our friends at Duncan Aviation look further into the complicated quandary known as WAAS, expanding on why LPV approaches with the system require two FMSs and two GPS receivers. Check it out at this link.  

Aviation News Rundown: A tribute to a local friend of the airport, plus news on the Boeing 787 and Cessna Citation

Longtime Bowman Field (LOU) airman Richard C. "Dick" Mulloy died Saturday. That is Mulloy above, in an image furnished by the Aero Club of Louisville, which published this about his life:

In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Dick distinguished himself by playing in each of the post prestigious New Year’s Day Bowl games: The Sugar Bowl in 1940, the Rose Bowl in 1939 and the Orange Bowl in 1938, all for the University of Tennessee.

 

In addition to his football at Tennessee, he played football and baseball at St. Xavier High School in Kentucky, and was named All-State during his senior year. Once at Tennessee, he earned three letters in football and three in basketball. His 1940 football team was undefeated, untied and never scored on.

 

While at Tennessee he learned to fly, and in 1941, he entered the civilian pilot training program and later became a pilot instructor in the U. S. Army Primary Flying School. Later during World War II, he went to work for Chiang Kai-Shek under contract to the Chinese National Airlines flying “The Hump” across the Himalayas.

 

Following the war, Dick returned to Louisville and formed Kentucky Flying Service at Bowman Field. He built the organization over the years, operating out of the large hangar where they overhauled, maintained and sold aircraft.

 

In addition, Dick is credited with training more pilots than anyone else in this part of the country.

 

In 1987, he sold Kentucky Flying Service, and in 1992, he sold Helicopters, Inc., completing 47 years of operations at Bowman Field.

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In the news today, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week cites JP Morgan as saying the business jet market is "still in the doldrums," but recovery may only be a few quarters away. On the commercial side, the ax of poor economy continues to strike, as Reuters reports that Bahrain's state-owned Gulf Air has cut 500 jobs in the past six months.

On the positive side of commercial aviation, something that and can be seen as good news for Boeing's next generation of aircraft, the Gerson Lehrman Group notes that for every airliner cancelling a 787 order, another eager buyer is willing to take its place.

Finally, here are two industry announcements worth noting. Cessna introduced a program yesterday to reduce lead times for interior refurbishments on older Citations by stocking pre-selected, certified interior materials under a new program.

While the NBAA touted a resolution from the United States Senate that applauds general and business aviation for its efforts to provide relief to Haiti following the devastating earthquake in that nation early this year.

GA aircraft made more than 4,500 flights to Haiti during the first month following the disaster — when the airport and infrastructure were in shambles. At the same time, business aircraft performed more than 700 flights, transporting 3,500 passengers and delivering in excess of 1 million pounds of cargo and supplies.

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