All posts tagged 'Cessna Citation'

Obtaining an SIC Type Rating

Happy November everyone!

If you're like me lately, life has been super busy yet fun. And part of that busy-ness includes obtaining an SIC type rating for the first time. What needs to happen? What do you have to have? How does it differ from a regular add-on rating to your certificate?

Let's talk about it.

First things first, there is no check ride for an SIC type rating (and what a beautiful thing that is). It's a matter of meeting the training requirements and having an extra 20 minutes one day to meet with the FSDO/a DPE to do paperwork

1. Training Requirements

According to FAR Part 61.55 you have to have:

-At least a private pilot certificate with the appropriate category and class rating

-An instrument rating or privilege that applies to the aircraft being flown if the flight is under IFR

-At least a pilot type rating for the aircraft being flown unless the flight will be conducted as domestic flight operations within US airspace.

-No person may serve as a SIC of an aircraft type certificated for more than one required pilot flight crewmember or in operations requiring a second-in-command unless that person has within the previous 12 calendar months:

"Become familiar with the following information for the specific type aircraft for which second-in-command privileges are requested -

(i) Operational procedures applicable to the powerplant, equipment, and systems.

(ii) Performance specifications and limitations.

(iii) Normal, abnormal, and emergency operating procedures.

(iv) Flight manual.

(v) Placards and markings.

(2) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, performed and logged pilot time in the type of aircraft or in a flight simulator that represents the type of aircraft for which second-in-command privileges are requested, which includes -

(i) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop as the sole manipulator of the flight controls;

(ii) Engine-out procedures and maneuvering with an engine out while executing the duties of pilot-in-command; and

(iii) Crew resource management training."

That sounds like a lot, but it can be done pretty quickly.

I recently had to go through this for a CE-525 rating so I could start doing some contract flights. 99% of my flights lately have been in a CJ3 like this one listed on GlobalAir.com.

After going through this training over the course of about 2 months/4 flights, I called my local FSDO to set up an appointment to have the paperwork done.

They directed me from there to contact a DPE, whom I met with days later and had my SIC rating in hand within 20 minutes. No fee, no headache, and NO CHECK RIDE. 

Did I mention there was no check ride?!?! Best. feeling. ever.

There's also some more requirements that have to be met for the type rating, such as who can conduct the SIC training, listed in Part 61.55 as well. Make sure to read and understand them all before going up for a flight in order to avoid any issues.

2. Use of an SIC Type Rating

Before going through the training process, especially if you're paying for that flight time, ensure that the type rating will be put to use. For what purpose do you want to log SIC time? Just to build time? Meeting the requirements of a company you're flying for?

I'm sure the answer is straightforward, but it's always best to ask yourself these types of questions before jumping into something.

Other than this, SIC type ratings are pretty simple. Make sure when going through training you pay attention to the above listed items that you need to know, the more you know the safer you are!

Have any other tips for an SIC type rating you'd like to add? Feel free to comment below.

Happy Landings,

-Addi

TAMARACK’S ACTIVE WINGLETS SCORE HIGH AT NBAA

 

Orlando, FL – Six months ago no one was differentiating Active Winglet from Passive Winglet technology. However Tamarack Aerospace Group has successfully added the terms to our aviation lexicon. Following the introduction of a Cirrus SR-22 with Active Winglets at the AOPA Summit, the innovative engineering company brought a Cessna Citation recently upgraded with Active Winglets to the NBAA convention and found itself in a whirlwind of demonstrations, explanations and numerous meetings with aircraft manufacturers.

“We can’t reveal the results of those meetings or who they were with,” said Nick Guida, CEO of Tamarack, “but we are very optimistic about the future of Active Winglets.”

Tamarack personnel flew from their factory in Sand Point, Idaho to Orlando in their upgraded CitationJet, climbing out of KICT (1,300’ MSL) at gross to 41,000’ in 30 minutes. After refueling in KMGM (241’) they got back up to 41,000’ in 32 minutes. The book calls for 43 minutes and typical time to climb to FL 410 is 55 minutes. Formal flight testing is just getting underway and Tamarack expects to record some significant changes in performance with the added wingspan and Active Winglets. The upgrade adds four feet of wingspan.

Tamarack Aerospace expects to complete their STC program for the Cirrus in early 2013 and is on track to complete the Citation before the end of 2013. They have started taking $10,000 deposits (fully refundable) for Citation orders. The pre-STC price for the Citation is $196,000 and it is expected that installation for the Active Winglets will take approximately 160 hours.

“We expect to make significant inroads with Active Winglets in the coming year, and in a decade we expect they’ll be standard on most high end, fixed wing aircraft,” said Guida. “The benefits of winglets have long been established. The problem with the old fashioned passive systems is that there is a phenomenal weight penalty arising from the additional structure required to offset bending loads. Those loads can exceed design limits. With Active Winglets, which feature Tamarack Active Control Surfaces (TACS), the bending loads don’t develop. They’re almost instantly counter balanced, meaning the heavy structure will be left on the factory floor.”

For more information on Active Winglets and other Tamarack products, visit www.TamarackAero.com or call Brian Willett at 855-I-FLY-TAG (435.9824); overseas: 1.208.255.4400.

PHOTO CAPTION: Reaction at NBAA to the CitationJet with Active Winglets was positive and enthusiastic.
 

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