All posts tagged 'Citation'

The Business Mission Drives The Aircraft Mission

Image: Gulfstream G650

The Gulfstream G650 and Citation Ten vie for the world’s fastest business jet. But if you need to get an accident victim from the accident scene to a hospital fast, you most likely need a helicopter. Business jets are not designed to land beside the highway and helicopters won't do for a long cross-country flight. I'm stating the obvious, but how many aircraft choices seem to ignore this?

"To execute the corporate mission" is the answer to the business question "Why do we have an aircraft?" If the aircraft is a personal aircraft, the "why" may be "to enjoy flying." What type of flying is fun to one person can be very different from another. In the world of business aircraft, whether the business is high tech, services, hospitality, acute care, etc., the why of the aircraft must be tied into the why of the company. If it isn't, then the aircraft may be a mismatch to the company mission.

The closer the aircraft's mission can be tied into the reason for the corporation's existence, the more secure the aircraft (and aviation employees' jobs) will be. If IBM were having a tough year financially, no one would ever suggest that they get rid of all their computers! How close does the mission of your business aircraft fit into the reason your company exists? If the aircraft went away, would it have a negative impact on the ability of its users to successfully execute the company's mission?

Our own company mission is: The mission of Conklin & de Decker is to enable the general aviation industry to make more informed decisions when dealing with the purchase, operation and disposition of aircraft by furnishing objective and impartial information.

We are much too small to afford a corporate aircraft, but if/when we get there, the aircraft better directly support our ability to "enable the general aviation industry to make more informed decisions." The added value to the business from the person(s) using the corporate aircraft must exceed the costs of having that aircraft. If the leader of a corporation is worth $1 billion dollars to the corporation, and their use of the company aircraft enhances that value, then the $1 million budget for the aircraft should be easily defensible. If the mission of the health services company includes providing critical care to a large community, then the EMS helicopter should be easily defensible.

A company has a written mission statement that is used to guide its daily business. The aviation department should also have a written mission statement. That mission statement should support the mission of the corporation. The aviation department should be part of the corporate structure just as legal, human resources, IT and other departments. Your may not be making widgets, but you are making the making and selling of the widgets easier and more productive.

After that, the next step is developing the measurement criteria for the aircraft to enable management to determine how well the aircraft is at meeting its mission needs. Then, and only then, can you start the analysis of speed, range, payload, cabin, and performance needed to make a wise aircraft choice.

What you then end up with is measureable criteria that can be used to evaluate the aircraft choices. Each of those criteria stem from the assigned mission of the aircraft. The assigned mission of the aircraft is directly supporting the mission of the corporation. Thus, the answer to the question of why do we need eight seats and 2,400 NM range, is to support the corporate mission.

A caution here is that in some situations, supporting the senior leadership can be mistaken for NOT supporting the corporation. There are no easy answers to the "big boss uses company jet for private retreat" headline. But, that personal use of the corporate aircraft better be documented and reported.

Business aircraft of all types can be used to further the successful mission accomplishment of the corporation. These missions need to be in writing and clear enough so that the justification of the use of a business aircraft can easily be done.

What is your mission statement? Does your choice of transportation reflect it? Let us know in the comments section below!

Cessna Introduces A New Citation Sovereign

Article by: www.aero-news.com
New Avionics, New Engines In The Latest Of The Line

Cessna has introduced the latest variant of its Citation Sovereign line at the NBAA convention in Orlando, and announced that the "Citation X" will live on.

“This year, we are thrilled with the steps we have taken to deliver what our customers want and need,” said Scott Ernest, Cessna President and CEO. “These innovations further underscore our commitment to bring cutting edge aircraft and service to market for today and tomorrow and to exceed our customers’ expectations year after year.”

The New Citation Sovereign now delivers increased range, updated technologies and enhanced capabilities. Features of the airplane, currently on display at NBAA include:

  • New cockpit with Garmin G5000 avionics suite
  • Increased range by 150 nm, boosting the New Citation Sovereign total range to over 3,000 nm
  • Powered by the new Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306D engine
  • New cabin amenities including the integrated Cessna Clarity cabin management system, in addition to improved seat design
  • Improved short runway performance
  • Integrated automatic throttles
  • Winglets have been added, giving the aircraft a distinct appearance and an aerodynamic boost
  • Improved ground cooling performance

Line flow has already started on the New Citation Sovereign, and entry into service is expected in the early third quarter of 2013. The new Sovereign will also be available with a utility configuration, with options to carry payload, people, or both, depending on the mission requirements.

Meanwhile the Citation X name will live on. When the plans were drawn to improve on the Citation X systems and performance, that aircraft was to be called the “Citation TEN”. Through the design and certification process, the Citation TEN has claimed the title of world’s fastest business jet, but customers have told Cessna that they prefer the new aircraft retain the Citation X name.

“You can see customer input present throughout the entire process,” said Roxanne Bernstein, senior vice president of Marketing. “We’ve implemented customer input with various designs, we value customer feedback with services, and we also listen to the customer when it comes to guidance with naming our aircraft. Customers value the performance and system improvements with the updated aircraft, the fact that the new Citation X is the world’s fastest business jet with a top speed of Mach 0.935, and they value the original name. So Cessna has decided that, moving forward, this aircraft will be called the new Citation X.”

Cessna also reinforced the company’s activities tied to the smart global growth strategy including opening Citation Service Centers in the United Kingdom and Spain. The company announced the first Cessna-owned Citation Service Center in the UK, located at Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield. The newly-acquired 50,000-square-foot facility, rebranded as the Doncaster Citation Service Centre, offers a wide range of services to Citation customers, from maintenance to modernization and paint. Previously known as Kinch Aviation Services, the business has operated for 15 years and been a Cessna authorized service facility for the past four years.

Cessna highlighted the grand opening of its new regional Citation Service Center in Valencia, Spain. The 100,400-square foot (9,328-square meter), state-of-the-art facility is located at Valencia Airport (ICAO: LEVC) in eastern Spain, convenient for Citation customers across Western Europe and North Africa. The Center offers a one-stop shop for comprehensive repair, completion, fulfillment, maintenance and customization services.

In addition to Cessna’s extensive U.S. based network, Cessna now operates four Citation Service Centers in Europe, with Valencia and Doncaster complementing facilities in Paris, France, and Prague, Czech Republic.

(Images courtesy Cessna)
FMI: www.cessna.com

Report: Cessna may replace Sovereign 680, Citation XLS+


The Citation XLS+ may soon be replaced with an upgraded model

FlightGlobal reported last week that Cessna Aircraft Company is developing a pair of business jets to compete with the super-light and mid-sized offerings from Embraer, its Legacy 450 and Legacy 500.

The two new Cessna models would replace the Citation XLS+ and Sovereign 680. As most of Cessna’s new deliveries have focused on the very light jet Citation Mustang, the company’s executives expect orders to shift toward light and midsize aircraft.

The news comes as Embraer announced last week that it will open a manufacturing plant in Florida.

Citation Mustang outfitted with medical gear

Cessna recently announced that its Citation Mustang can now complete another mission, this one perhaps to save lives.

The aircraft can now be outfitted with equipment from Spectrum Aeromed to modify it into a medical transport. Cessna delivered the news during last month’s EAA Airventure.

The medical Mustang will feature the single-patient 2200 Series advanced life-support module from Spectrum Aeromed. It features a specially designed stretcher to move patients comfortably in and out of tight quarters. [more]

The system includes 3500 liters of oxygen, an air compressor and vacuum pump, in addition to AC outlets and pneumatic outlets. It currently can be fitted into the Citation I, II and III models, as well as other aircraft.

Cessna will install the system at its service center in Wichita, Kansas in about a week’s time, the company said in a release. Pricing has not yet been released.

The first delivery is set to take place in October to Jet Budget, a Caribbean charter operator, according to the Cessna statement.

Cessna Citation X gets an upgrade for 2011

The Citation X will get a boost starting next year — in the cockpit and in the cabin.

Cessna announced this week that new jets will feature a Honeywell Primus Elite avionics suite, a modification on the current Honeywell Primus 2000 system. 

The Elite suite features LCD display of high-resolution approach charts, XM weather in the U.S. and southern Canada, map capabilities to show geographical and political markers, airspace and airways.

New CMS features in the Cessna jet include touch-screen controls and MP3 inputs.

The new Citation X cabin includes better stereo and an updated Airshow display, including dual Blu-Ray players and an HD display monitor in the forward closet.

UPDATE: The following is from AINOnline.

A Cessna spokesman told AIN the work will be done exclusively by the company’s nine Citation factory service centers. “While we have announced that this feature will be available we are still working on final certification and won’t know the downtime required for installation until 2011. We are looking at a cost of about $585,000,” he said.

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