All posts tagged 'EAA' - Page 2

Combat Pilots and Famous Warbirds Featured at Warbirds in Review During EAA AirVenture 2014

Clarence E. "Bud" Anderson is a WWII Triple Ace who flew the P-51 Mustang Old Crow, while assigned to the 357th Fighter Group "Yoxford Boys," 8th Air Force, Leiston Field, United Kingdom. He4 will be speaking at EAA AirVenture about his Vietnam War experience. (Photo courtesty https://www.cebudanderson.com)

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin — (June 2, 2014) — A rare opportunity to listen to combat pilots tell their stories and view wartime aircraft will be at this year’s Warbirds in Review at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2014.

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, the 62nd annual fly-in convention for the Experimental Aircraft Association, is July 28-Aug. 3 at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh.

On Tuesday, July 29, at 1 p.m. World War II triple-ace Bud Anderson, author of "To Fly & Fight: Memoirs of a Triple Ace" will talk about his little-known experience in the Vietnam War. This presentation also includes a showcase of the P-51 "Old Crow" with owners Jim Hagedorn and Jack Roush, plus a surprise guest.

Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Major Gen. Patrick Brady appears on Wednesday, July 30 at 10 a.m. Brady is the author of "Dead Men Flying." His talk will feature the Bell UH-1 Iroquois "Huey" helicopter owned by the Army Aviation Heritage Foundation.

Another interesting Warbird is highlighted by Jerry Yellin, a P-51 pilot who flew as part of the last mission of World War II. This presentation on Friday, Aug. 1 at 1 p.m. will feature the North American P-51 owned by Tony Buechler.

Christina Olds, author of "Fighter Pilot: The Memoirs of Legendary Ace Robin Olds," will be speaking at 1 p.m. on Monday, July 28, recalling her father’s experiences as a World War II ace and Vietnam F-4 pilot. Spectators can also view the Lockheed P-38 Lightning and Curtiss P-40 Warhawk owned by Ron Fagen of the Fagen Fighters WWII Museum. Ron and Eric Fagen will talk about the restoration, operation and flying characteristics of these beautiful aircraft.

This weeklong Warbirds in Review schedule also includes other presentations from Warbird veterans and the showcasing of various wartime crafted planes. The presentations will be at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. daily at EAA AirVenture’s Warbird Alley. Preceding the presentations, Warbirds Living History Group will host educational talks/demonstrations on flight gear associated with the upcoming aircraft. In addition, singers/entertainers Theresa Eaman and the "Letters Home" girls will entertain just prior to each presentation. Visit the EAA Warbirds of America website for schedule and details about each presentation.

About EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh is "The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration" and EAA’s yearly membership convention. Additional EAA AirVenture information, including advance ticket and camping purchase, is available online at www.airventure.org. EAA members receive lowest prices on admission rates. For more information on EAA and its programs, call 1-800-JOIN-EAA (1-800-564-6322) or visit www.eaa.org. Immediate news is available at www.twitter.com/EAAupdate.

New EAA Video Answers Pilots’ Questions about Completing FAA MedXPress Medical Form

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wis. — (April 9, 2014) — A new EAA video is answering the most common questions about the now-required MedXPress online form for FAA airmen medical certificates, including how to save time when completing the form.

This unique video features Dr. Greg Pinnell, a member of EAA’s Aeromedical Advisory Council, which consists of EAA-member physicians who volunteer their time to assist other members and guide EAA policy on aeromedical issues. Dr. Pinnell is also a senior flight surgeon for the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Space Wing and founded Air Docs, a health provider focused on aviation medical examinations and certification.

“Many longtime pilots are used to filling out the paper form at their own aviation medical examiner’s office, but the FAA now only allows the online form to be used,” said Sean Elliott, EAA’s vice president of advocacy and safety. “The online requirement has led to many questions and occasional confusion and misunderstanding for pilots unfamiliar with the MedXPress system. This new EAA video answers questions, clears confusion, and ensures the first step in obtaining an airman medical certificate is a smooth one.”

During the 20-minute video Dr. Pinnell goes step-by-step through the MedXPress registration and completion process. That includes displaying individual online screens and easy-to-follow instructions on completing the pre-examination paperwork.

“Along with showing the MedXPress online completion process, the video discusses many of the related questions that EAA headquarters receives on a regular basis, as well as those I receive as a senior aviation medical examiner,” Dr. Pinnell said. “We’ve found that having this type of visual instruction is a great help to clearing much of the confusion and apprehension that pilots might have when using the system.”

EAA embodies the spirit of aviation through the world’s most engaged community of aviation enthusiasts. EAA’s 185,000 members and 1,000 local chapters enjoy the fun and camaraderie of sharing their passion for flying, building and restoring recreational aircraft. For more information on EAA and its programs, call 800-JOIN-EAA (800-564-6322) or go to www.eaa.org. For continual news updates, connect with the EAA Twitter feed.

Help Build the "One Week Wonder" at Airventure!

At the Zenith Builders in September, Charlie Becker (Director of Communities & Homebuilt Community Manager) spoke about the return of the One Week Wonder! project to AirVenture (Oshkosh) next year. Photo © Sabastien Heintz

EAA’s unique building project is focused on building a Zenith CH 750 kit aircraft during the seven days of EAA AirVenture 2014, beginning on July 28 and continuing through completion or the event’s final day on August 3. The goal is to completely construct, inspect, and taxi test the aircraft by the end of the weeklong event.

"We want people to discover that building an airplane is not that complicated and is within the reach of just about anyone, by watching this project take shape during the week and participating in it themselves," said Charlie Becker, EAA’s manager of the organization’s homebuilt programs. "This Zenith kit will arrive at Oshkosh just as any builder would receive it. The One Week Wonder will show how today’s advanced kits and technology make aircraft building accessible and affordable, especially with the support from many EAA programs and members. It’s a fun, interactive opportunity that will show thousands of people exactly how an airplane goes together."

The One Week Wonder project will also allow EAA to showcase how a person can build their own airplane, the technical achievements along the way, and EAA support programs for aircraft builders. AirVenture attendees will be able to add their own "hands-on" moment in the construction project and sign the logbook as one of the builders.

In the One Week Wonder display area, which will be located near the EAA Welcome Center in the main crossroads of the AirVenture grounds, other displays will include the completed Zenith CH 750 built by EAA employees – including many who had never built an airplane previously. There will also be interactive displays that highlight the aircraft construction process, the variety of aircraft available for builders, and information on getting started on an aircraft project.

More details about the One Week Wonder project will be announced as they are finalized. You can also learn more about building Zeniths at Sabastien Heintz’s blog

Valdez STOL Aircraft to be Showcased at AirVenture

Specially modified aircraft originally created for Alaskan bush-pilot necessity that also created one of the world’s most unique aviation competitions, will be part of the "Valdez STOL" (short takeoff and landing) flying activities at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2014.

EAA AirVenture 2014, known as "The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration" and the 62nd annual convention of the Experimental Aircraft Association, will be held July 28-August 3 at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh.

Demonstrations featuring the unmatched capabilities of the airplanes that compete at the annual

"Most people think of airport runways of concrete a mile or more in length, but these aircraft can land on almost any flat surface – sometimes in less than 100 feet," said Jim DiMatteo, EAA’s vice president of AirVenture features and attractions. "The necessity of creating aircraft that can serve Alaska’s remote population also inspired a competition that is nothing like you’ll see in the Lower 48."

Further details and schedules of the Valdez STOL aircraft activities will be announced as they are finalized.

For footage of aircraft at the Valdez fly-in, see the video below:

Confessions of a Student Pilot

Over the past 5 years I have more than earned my right to be called a student pilot. Between when I was 12 years old and now I have attended 3 different flight schools, passed my FAA Written Exam twice, and been lightheartedly made fun of by CFIs for rookie mistakes countless times. It’s been said that it’s about the journey, not the destination, and this rings incredibly true in the world of aviation. I have learned more about life and passion through aerospace than I ever learned in my standard high school curriculum. I have been taught discipline, self-control, dedication, logical thinking... All through my experiences in chasing my dream of becoming a pilot.

I hope to help other student pilots remember why they are doing this. It can be such a challenge to continue training when you feel you are stuck in a rut, or you will never achieve the dream that we all chase after. I have compiled a few observations or "confessions," if you will, that have stuck out to me during my journey. A few come with stories, a few are simply food for thought. Here are my confessions of a student pilot.

Keep your training consistent. This may seem obvious, but it keeps many student pilots from advancing quickly enough to reach their full potential. It is far better to wait and save up enough money for a flight lesson every week or so than to attend your flight school sporadically. For the first 3 years of my training I could only afford one lesson every month (between allowance and babysitting money that wasn’t too bad!) If I could go back and do it again, I would have saved up for a year or so and had lessons sequentially in just a couple months. In having to wait, I kept relearning the same concepts every month and was nowhere near reaching my full potential.

Don’t be scared to be assertive. On June 19th, 2013 I was on a routine flight with my instructor, going around the traffic pattern at Capital City airport. As my instructor continually pointed out, I was spending too much time with my eyes glued to the instrument panel and not enough time looking outside. As I turned for my downwind leg, he held a sheet of paper over the instrument panel to stop my nervous eyes from glancing inside too much. I huffed a bit, then began making a call to other traffic that I was on downwind. "Capital City traffic, Cessna -" my heart sank. I hadn’t memorized our tail number yet and the sheet of paper was obscuring my view of it. Without skipping a beat, I forcefully moved (read: slapped) my instructor’s hand out of the way, read the tail number off, and finished my radio call. I immediately felt bad and apologized for what I had done, but I had never seen my instructor so thrilled. "That’s what I’m talking about! THAT was a pilot in command move. If you know what you need to do, don’t ask my permission." The very next day I was endorsed and did my first solo flight. Which is the perfect segway into my next point...

Your solo IS as big of a deal as everyone says. Let’s say you have comprehended enough knowledge to safely takeoff and land an aircraft, and your instructor has enough faith in your abilities to let you do it completely by yourself. Congratulations, it’s time to fly solo! The whole ordeal in and of itself isn’t a big change from your previous lessons, as you have probably done exactly the same routine of taking off and landing many times before your instructor steps out. The real value and importance of a solo isn’t in the fact that there is one less passenger, it is that YOU are now the pilot in command. According to Federal Aviation Regulation 91.3, "The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of that aircraft." You are now the CEO head honcho in charge of all aspects of safely executing your current flight mission. The boost of confidence that a student pilot gains after safely landing their first solo flight is astronomical. Celebrate this accomplishment and truly think about what it means to now be the pilot in command.

Networking is everything. I am a first-generation pilot. Nobody in my family has any ties to aviation, besides a strange obsession with warbirds my father and grandfather share. When I first started my flight training I felt like a very tiny fish in a very huge pond. All that I knew was that becoming a pilot was extremely expensive, difficult, and overwhelming... but that I absolutely could not live my life without doing it. I had not met a single female pilot in my first two years of training, but I knew they had to be out there. I began doing google searches, talking to family friends, and subscribed to seven different flight magazines in an attempt to gain an understanding of the general aviation community as a whole. Through a family friend I came in contact with a female UPS pilot, and she introduced me to the Ninety-Nines. From there I learned about Women in Aviation, AOPA, EAA, NBAA, all of these crazy acronyms which represented different organizations in the aviation community. I have met tons of interesting people who have taken a genuine interest in my future as a pilot, and I have learned so much about the different pathways that are available to me in the aerospace industry. Having a good network to support you is incredibly important for an aspiring pilot.

Do not give up. The most important "confession" I have for fellow student pilots is to not give up, no matter how difficult it becomes. Keep trying. Stay motivated. There have been times in my training where I have been completely overwhelmed and felt very unsure as to whether or not I would actually achieve my dreams. When this happens, I like to take a step back and evaluate what really draws me to aviation in the first place. I watch episodes of The Aviators, or read aviation literature and really soak in the pure beauty and freedom that a pilot can obtain. The challenge is half the fun, however daunting it may seem. I encourage all student pilots to really think about what keeps them going and to cling to it until they finally reach the day of achieving their ultimate goals.

End of content

No more pages to load