All posts tagged 'EASA'

EASA's First Executive Director Honored with 2013 European Business Aviation Award

Patrick Goudou Lauded for Collaboration with Industry in Setting Aviation Policies

Contacts: Dan Hubbard, (202) 783-9360, dhubbard@nbaa.org
Ana Baptista, EBAA, +32 2 766 00 73, abaptista@ebaa.org


Geneva, Switzerland, May 21, 2013 – The European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) and National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) announced today that Patrick Goudou, who has served as the executive director for the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) since its establishment in 2003, has been honored with the 2013 European Business Aviation Award.

The award was presented during a May 21 luncheon on the first day of the 13th annual European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (EBACE2013), the only European exhibition focusing solely on business aviation. In presenting the award, EBAA Chairman Rodolfo Baviera lauded Goudou’s work in establishing EASA as an aviation rulemaking authority, as well as for his collaboration with the business aviation community in determining aviation policy.

“Thanks in large part to Patrick's work, it is well understood at EASA that effective regulations are those that have been informed through input from industry stakeholders, who have a first-hand understanding of what business aviation operations look like on a day-to-day basis,” Baviera said. “Not only has his collaborative approach been successful in the formation of effective business aviation safety regulations; it has also been successful in setting the tone for how EASA, as an agency, approaches its policymaking work with the business aviation community – one example being the recognition that business aviation needs different flight-and duty time rules from airline operations.”

Goudou's extensive background in the aerospace industry includes a 22-year career with the French General Delegation for Armaments (Delegation Generale pour l'Armement - DGA). Prior to joining EASA, Goudou served as chief executive of the French Aeronautical Maintenance Agency (Service de la maintenance aeronautique - SMA), where he oversaw that organization's responsibilities for engineering, maintenance and repairs to aircraft, engines and aircraft equipment, as well as for the design and production of aeronautical parts.

“Patrick came to EASA with a long-standing aviation background, which is a good thing, because he certainly needed that solid foundation to build an entire agency from the ground up,” Baviera added. “In spite of the countless priorities that would confront anyone trying to stand up a whole new agency, Patrick always had an open door to the business aviation community.”

Goudou will step down from his position at the end of August. He will be succeeded by Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) Joint Undertaking Executive Director Patrick Ky.

The annual European Business Aviation Awards have been given since the inception of EBACE in 2001. Past recipients are as follows (titles and affiliations shown were current at time of award presentation):

• David McMillan, director general of Eurocontrol, and Don Spruston, director general of the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) (2012).
• Peter Lonergan, former Biggin Hill Airport director, and Richard Gaona, Comlux Aviation Group president (2011).
• Elie Zelouf, senior vice president of Jet Aviation, and officials at Aéroports de Paris (2010).
• Marwan Khalek, CEO and co-founder of Gama Aviation Limited, and Lyon-Bron Business Airport (2009).
• Mark Booth, chairman and CEO of NetJets Europe (2008).
• Judith Moreton, Bombardier Skyjet International, and Mark Wilson, British Business and General Aviation Association (2007).
• Geneva PALEXPO and Flight Safety International (2006).
• TAG Aviation and Cannes/Mandelieu Airport (2005).
• Jean-Francois Georges, Dassault Aviation, and Fernand Francois, European Business Aviation Association (2004).
• Ahid Quntar, Royal Wings/Arab Wings, and Andrew Walters, Regional Airports Ltd. (2003).
• Richard Gooding, London City Airport, and Jean-Pierre Jobin, Geneva International Airport (2002).
• Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, LEGO, and Frederik Sørensen, Head of Unit, European Commission (2001).
For more information on EBACE2013, visit www.ebace.aero/2013.

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About EBAA: The European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) was founded in 1977 to defend the interests of business aviation. Today, more than 500 business aviation companies (direct members or members of associate organizations) rely on the EBAA to protect their business interests. It is the only voice to represent business aviation among the European institutions. For more information, visit www.ebaa.org.

About NBAA: Founded in 1947 and based in Washington, DC, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) is the leading organization for companies that rely on general aviation aircraft to help make their businesses more efficient, productive and successful. The Association represents more than 9,000 companies and provides more than 100 products and services to the business aviation community, including the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, the world's largest civil aviation trade show. Learn more about NBAA at www.nbaa.org.

Off-Shore Aircraft Registration

In the maritime world, a ship is said to be "flying a flag of convenience" if it is registered in a foreign country "for purposes of reducing operating costs or avoiding government regulations." The country of registration determines the laws under which the ship is required to operate under and also that which are to be applied in any relevant maritime legal cases that might come about.

In aviation there are a multitude of reasons why you might choose to register your aircraft off-shore under the flag of a foreign country. Some of these include:

Complete Anonymity, i.e. if you suffer from celebrity notoriety; or you are a powerful corporate leader who relies on discreet and untracked movement within the territory of your competitors; or simply for personal reasons requiring anonymity. When your aircraft has been registered off-shore your privacy protection begins. If a journalist, corporate competitor or other interested party seeks the registered owner of your aircraft; their search will end with the contact details of your registered agent or trustee, and not with you.

Sales Tax or other Tax Avoidance, i.e. generally speaking, it is fairly simple for you to avoid a multitude of forms of taxation that are normally associated with the ownership and operation of a private or business aircraft, by registering it off-shore. Neutral Nationality Registration, i.e. this issue has become very prominent since we have moved into the new age of terrorism and unrest. By registering off-shore, you can fly internationally without instant recognition as being from the U.S.A.

Most foreign registries require that the registrant be a citizen of that country. The United States is the same: A U.S. citizen by definition of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 47.2 can be an individual, or partnership where each individual is a U.S. citizen, or a corporation organized under the laws of the United States, state, territory, or possession of the United States of which the president and at least two-thirds of the board of directors are U.S. citizens and 75 percent of the voting interest is owned or controlled by U.S. citizens. A resident alien is considered to be a corporation other than classified as a U.S. citizen, lawfully organized and doing business under the laws of the United States or of any state thereof, if the aircraft is based and used primarily in the United States; or a government entity (federal, state, or local). How then do these off-shore registries allow a foreigner to register with them? This is allowed by the employment of a native 'Trustee' or 'Agent' who acts on-behalf for the foreign ownership entity, under the auspices of a formal 'Trust Agreement.' In all cases there are annual fees that are payable to the agent. The U.S.A. aircraft registration branch is the only authority that I know of, that does not charge any annual registration fees.

Internationally, the most popular off-shore countries of registration are Bermuda, the United States of America, and now the relatively new player: the Isle of Mann. The "M" Registration was first introduced in 2007 by the government of this small island tax-haven which is located in the North Sea between England and Northern Ireland; it is probably better known for its T.T. motorcycle racing history rather than for its aviation industry.

Even though the aircraft eligible for entry onto the "M" or "Manx" registration must all be Type Certificated by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the Isle of Mann has chosen to more closely mimic the Federal Aviation Regulations of the United States rather than the bureaucratic tangles and inconsistencies that are normally found within the rules established by the European Aviation Authorities. Interestingly though, no non-resident islander can register any aircraft that is non-turbine powered and below 12,500 lbs MGTOW, or in the case of Helicopters, a non-twin-turbine powered machine.

Since a convenient loophole in the Value Added Tax (VAT) Regulations was recently exorcised by the European Union from the Danish Ministry of Taxations' rolls, whereby a 'flat-tax' was charged for an aircraft run through their tax-registration system, instead of the normal 25% or so, being charged like everyone else. The Isle of Man registry has quickly taken the lead largely because of its zero tax ratings for both corporations and inheritances, and depending on an aircraft owner's tax domicile, the Manx government provides a pathway for owners to either significantly reduce or even eliminate the VAT charge on their aircraft purchase.

By the beginning of November, 2009 almost 180 business jets and turbo-props had already been enrolled onto the Manx aircraft register. I am certain that this number shall continue climbing at a high rate. How do you or your company handle the Registration of you aircraft? Please click on the link below which states "Reply to this Article", your thoughts and comments would be very much appreciated. Be funny, be inspired, but most importantly of all, please be nice.

Have you had any experience with this topic? If so, Discuss it with us by clicking "Reply"

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