All posts tagged 'Fuel'

GlobalAir.com Displays “Oshkosh Specials” To Flyers Heading To EAA AirVenture

June 18, 2014 – Globalair.com announced today it has launched its annual “Oshkosh Specials” page. Since 2010 Globalair.com has produced this seasonal webpage, giving flyers heading to EAA’s AirVenture the ability to review discounts and special deals offered from FBOs nationwide just for them.

Jeff Carrithers, President and CEO of Globalair.com explains, “FBOs across the nation know Oshkosh is right around the corner and they also know there are thousands of aircraft flying from all over the nation heading to the event. They offer great specials for pilots, from large fuel discounts to free parking to free camping access. Some FBOs make it a little fun by offering food of some type. I always enjoy the free doughnuts myself, but some FBOs even offer hamburgers and barbeques.”

This is the fourth year Globalair.com has presented this information online to both aviators heading to Oskhosh and FBOs offering discounts. It is also the only aviation website that offers several EAA AirVenture specials in one place, with dozens of deals and discounts posted from across the nation. It is a good idea to check back often throughout the month of July as it is being up dated frequently. For those flying to Oshkosh, this is a must, as it will give pilots and operators plenty of time to review the listings, contact the FBOs and plan a cross country flight to the show. The page will also be available for the trip back home.

You can access the page at: https://www.globalair.com/airport/specials.aspx

FBOs that have specials they would like to post may contact fbo@globalair.com with the appropriate information, including the airport identifier, the name of the FBO, a point of contact and a short description (less than 200 characters) of the discount/special.

NRC Flies World's First Civil Jet Powered by 100 Percent Biofuel

Article by: www.aero-news.com
Falcon 20 Burns Unblended Replacement Fuel In Test Flight

The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) achieved a major milestone for the aviation industry as it recently flew the first civil jet powered by 100 percent unblended biofuel. This historic flight symbolizes a significant step not only for the aerospace industry, but also towards advancing sustainable sources of renewable energy.

"I have now flown the world's first 100 percent biofuel flight," said Tim Leslie, one of NRC's pilots. "We have been working hard with our partners for many months, and it is most rewarding to see it all come together. It is truly inspiring to take this step towards an eco-friendly future."

"I congratulate the aerospace team at the National Research Council of Canada for achieving today's milestone in aviation history," said the Honourable Gary Goodyear, Minister of State (Science and Technology). "This is a perfect example of how government and industry work together to bridge the gap between Canadian innovation and commercialization. The NRC, through our government's investments, helps support the Canadian economy by enabling its partners to develop and bring effective sustainable energy solutions to market."

The pure biofuel flowed into the engines of the Falcon 20 - one of NRC's specifically-equipped and the best-suited jet for this challenge - as it flew over Canada's capital. A second aircraft, the NRC’s T-33, outfitted with an array of under-wing sensors, tailed the Falcon in flight and collected valuable information on the emissions generated by the biofuel. Research experts at the National Research Council will analyze this information to better understand the environmental impact of biofuel. Preliminary results are expected to be released in the following weeks.

The biofuel used for this flight was transformed by Applied Research Associates and Chevron Lummus Global using oilseed crops commercialized by Agrisoma Bioscience Inc. This aviation initiative is funded by the Government of Canada's Clean Transportation Initiatives and the Green Aviation Research and Development Network.

(Image provided by NRC of Canada)
FMI: www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

Pilot To Fly Cessna On Fuel From Melted Plastic

Article by Glenn Pew, Contributing Editor, Video Editor
Brought to you by: www.avweb.com

British pilot Jeremy Roswell hopes this November to fly 10,000 miles from Sydney to London in a diesel Cessna 182 burning petroleum fuel processed from waste plastics. The fuel has been developed by Cynar Plc, an Irish company that uses a process called pyrolysis to melt down plastic trash into a petroleum distillate. That product can be separated into various fuels, including a viable aviation fuel, according to the company, which says it has already tested its fuel in cars. Roswell's flight will require more than 1,000 gallons of the fuel to make his flight. And Cynar will require roughly five tons of plastic garbage to make Roswell's fuel. The company says its plastic waste diesel fuel is cleaner than conventional Jet A, its production process is cleaner, still, and it estimates a low cost per gallon in production. That said, it has expressed awareness of some potential limitations.

According to Cynar, its pyrolysis technique, which melts plastics in an anaerobic environment, creates no emissions, and a report published in November 2011 put the cost to produce one gallon of Cyn-Diesel at $1.50. As an aviation fuel, "It'll need testing and trials, but for a diesel engine not going beyond 8,000 feet, it should be fine," Cynar CEO Michael Murray told BusinessGreen.com. Roswell plans to cruise at 5,000 feet, flying roughly 13 hours each day. He will attempt to fit the 10,000-mile trip into a six-day adventure with stops at Darwin, Christmas Island, Sri Lanka, Jordan, and Malta. Roswell told the company his objective is to prove the viability of synthetic fuel made from plastic waste "and by doing so replace the need to use fossil fuels from conventional sources." According to Cynar, there are 26 million tons of plastics feeding U.S. landfills each year, backed by another 15 million tons headed each year to landfills in Europe. Says Murray, "I think [the fuel] can be a viable alternative if the industry adopts diesel-type engines." One plant that already exists in Ireland can process 20 tons of sorted plastics per year, producing 1.5 million gallons of fuel, according to the report titled, "Converting End of Life Plastic into Diesel The Cynar Experience" (PDF).

Extending Your Fuel Efficiency

Article By: Peter Garrison
Brought to you by: www.flyingmag.com

It ought not to be true, but it is: In every pilot’s life there comes a moment when he wishes he had a little more fuel.

Perhaps the headwind was stronger than forecast; the gauges have dropped below a quarter sooner than you hoped they would; the descent and climb for an en route stop to drop off a passenger used up more fuel than you expected; you took a detour around weather; or your planning was careless in the first place. Whatever the reason, you find yourself in that awkward spot: a certain distance from your destination, with a certain amount of fuel and with a nagging worry about where those needles will be pointing when you arrive.
The cautious thing to do is to land at the next opportunity and get more fuel. But that is not always possible or convenient. There may be no intermediate place with suitable weather; you may have told someone to meet you at a certain time. And there is always the reluctance to lose time, and to give up altitude and then to have to claw it back — a reluctance so strong that many a pilot has run out of fuel rather than overcome it.

But nothing can be done about extreme pigheadedness. Let us stipulate that there are situations in which a pilot of normal maturity, competence and regard for safety might feel concerned, even conflicted, about his or her remaining fuel, but in which a decision to continue might depend on rational analysis rather than, say, how lucky he or she was feeling that day. These are the situations in which it is not irresponsible to “stretch” range.

How far an airplane can go on a given amount of fuel is principally determined by four factors: propeller efficiency, fuel consumption, speed and wind.

The role of wind is obvious. Any headwind, and even a side wind, increases the time to fly. The chart of wind components is familiar to pilots, though roofers, who have to cut their two-by-fours to match the run and rise of rafters, are more likely to remember the precise numerical relationships. But in the era of GPS no chart is needed; the wind component is obvious from the groundspeed.

Your flight time will be lengthened in roughly the same proportion as the headwind component stands to your airspeed. If you cruise at 150 knots and the wind component is minus 15 knots, your flight time will be increased by about one part in 10; it will take you 66 minutes — actually, 66 minutes and 40 seconds — to go as far as you would normally go in an hour. That is not likely to be a problem. But a component of 30 or 40 knots might be. To maximize your range you want as little headwind as possible, and so you should pick an altitude — if you haven’t already done so — where the wind component is least.

A headwind component works against you in two ways. First and more clearly, it increases the time needed to go a certain distance. Less obviously, it complicates the choice of a speed to fly.

Speed is a pilot’s most powerful tool for increasing range. The amount of speed you get in exchange for a given fuel flow — in other words, your miles per gallon — varies across the speed range. It is worst at very high and very low speeds, owing at the high-speed end to parasite drag and at the low-speed end to lift-related induced drag. Parasite drag increases with speed, and induced drag increases with slowness; they are equal at the speed for minimum drag. This is the speed at which the least power is needed to stay aloft, and therefore it is the speed for greatest endurance. It is typically about a third greater than the clean stalling speed.

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