All posts tagged 'Jet'

Determining the Right Cabinet Modifications for Your Aircraft

A little planning upfront can save you a lot of time and money

Jay Scarff
Elliott Aviation Cabinet Technician Team Lead

www.elliottaviation.com

When you think of technology changes affecting your aircraft, your cabinets and woodwork may be the last thing on your mind. However, many modifications you are considering could benefit from upfront planning with the cabinet shop you are working with. Not only do new upgrades in laminates and veneers involve the cabinet technicians, but items such as audio visual mods (including wide screen monitors, DVD or BluRay players, sound systems and cabin management systems) all have direct involvement with your cabinet shop.

For example, we have many requests to either install or modify cabin monitors to accommodate high-definition, wide-screen displays. Depending on what type of aircraft you have and whether you currently have monitors installed, modifying your cabinets to accommodate wider screens may cause you to lose structure in your cabinets. If this is a potential issue, your cabinet technicians will need to determine how much structure will be left and whether it will pass inspection. If there is an issue, you could potentially still make the modification with some reengineering to the structure.

Another thing you may not take into account when installing monitors is seat height. Monitors placed directly over a seat will often get blocked by head rests and, if someone is sitting in that seat, they can completely block the screen. If you do not have room to place your monitor in a proper location, you can solve the issue by installing pull out monitors. .

In addition to monitors, when you install a DVD or BluRay player, subwoofer, or a cabin entertainment system close outs have to be fabricated in your cabinets to allow for access to easily serviceable components. When you are installing these accessories, you always have to keep in mind that you have to utilize every square inch of space while keeping everything looking nice.

In addition to the more technical components, more traditional changes to your woodwork or cabinets may have also evolved since you last made changes. Many older laminates have been discontinued. Since laminate cannot be repaired, the only option you have is to re-laminate. If your current laminate pattern is not available, you will either have mismatched laminate or will have to redo all of your cabinets. That is why for a longer-term solution I usually recommend veneer. Veneer typically lasts about 30% longer, has a stronger finish, allows you to repair scratches and offers you endless options as far as species. Laminate only really offer you a handful of colors.

Jay Scarff has been fabricating and installing cabinets since 1990. His vast experience includes custom fabrication for aircraft, commercial and residential construction and disaster restoration. Jay joined Elliott Aviation in 2006.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) .

Eclipse 550 Jet 'Powered Up' on Its Way to First Delivery

 

Eclipse Aerospace, Inc. celebrates a major production milestone - the first power up of the new production Eclipse 550 Twin-Engine Jet. The first production Eclipse 550 aircraft successfully powered up its two Pratt & Whitney PW610F engines, and the aircraft systems came on line today at the company’s facility in Albuquerque, N.M.

Eclipse Aerospace officially restarted the Eclipse Jet aircraft production line last June and continues to track for delivery of the first new Eclipse 550 series aircraft in the third quarter of this year. Built upon the same proven airframe as the Eclipse 500 aircraft, the new Eclipse 550 series is enhanced by additional technologies including a dual and redundant integrated flight management system and independent standby displays all powered by advanced microprocessors.

“What a great accomplishment by our entire team at Eclipse,” said Mason Holland, CEO of Eclipse Aerospace. “This event is another key signal to the world that we continue on our methodical and well executed plan to reintroduce production and delivery of the Eclipse 550 Jet this year.”

The operation of the current fleet of over 260 Eclipse twin-engine jets have already garnered a reputation as one of the most technologically advanced, safe, and fuel-efficient jets in general aviation. The Eclipse 550 will be powered by the same PW610F turbofan engines as are used in the EA-500, which collectively produce 1,800 lbs. of thrust. This gives the 6,000 lb. Eclipse Jet a maximum cruise speed of 375 knots and a maximum IFR range of 1,300 nm with a 45-minute fuel reserve. Like the EA-500, the Eclipse 550 will have a maximum service ceiling of 41,000 ft. and a cruise fuel flow of only 59 gal/hr.

“The global markets are improving, sales activity and orders continue to grow, and the Eclipse Jet is priced extremely competitively as the only jet available in the world for less than three million US dollars”, stated Holland. “This attractive acquisition price coupled with our industry leading operating costs of only $1.69 per nautical mile makes the Eclipse Jet a great value for our owner flown customers as well as Corporations and Governments alike.”

Eclipse 550 customers will also be able to customize their aircraft with new features including auto-throttles, synthetic vision, enhanced vision, satellite phones, custom interiors, and anti-skid brakes.

FMI: www.eclipse.aero

So You Think You Want To Be A Pilot: The International Corporate Pilot

    On the thirtieth day of March, in 1984, a Palestinian leader comfortably traveled from Tunis, Tunisia on to Conakry, Guinea in a private Gulfstream jet. The Palestinian leader plans to attend a funeral ceremony to pay respects to the recently deceased Guinean president, Ahmed Sekou Toure. The Gulfstream jet made its way from Tunis all the way to the Conakry Airport and was near final approach to land before ever encountering any error.

    Somewhere around five thousand feet on the decent, the captain of the Gulfstream aircraft became aware of an immensely overflowing pattern. At that point, the Gulfstream pilot had no choice but to hold in the pattern, this lasted for nearly an hour. Suddenly, the president of Nigeria entered the pattern from some thirty-five hundred feet in a 707 aircraft and he was not stopping. “Nigeria is landing, NOW” the 707 calls out! At this point, the air traffic control tower lost all control of the small runway and in mere moments the airport became amidst in utter chaos. The Pilot of the Gulfstream jet was rapidly running out of options and fuel, as he made an abrupt but necessary executive decision. The Gulfstream simply could not wade through this mess any longer; they would have to make an attempt to land and refuel elsewhere. The nearest FBO was located approximately 90 miles Southeast of Conakry, in a place called Freetown, located in Sierra Leone. The Gulfstream pilot immediately diverted his aircraft to Freetown, and upon arrival he was given the approval to land. On final approach however, his passengers demanded that he hold back and change course. “We cannot land here” said one of the Palestinian guards. His voice is stern and he was not budging, the pilot and his copilot, unsure as why they were unable to land in this town, had to come up with another plan. They MUST land somewhere or they were sure to deplete of fuel completely. The Gulfstream jet has no choice but to around, backtracking the 90 miles northwest to the Conakry airport.

    Upon returning back to the Conakry airport the pilots were less than enthused to learn that the FBO had completely sold out of fuel and the FBO would remain out of service until sometime around midnight. At this point, the Gulfstream crew had been on duty for thirty hours, they were completely exhausted and they had yet another flight to make prior to their shift ending. Once The Gulfstream was able to be refueled and serviced the crew made their way to Casablanca where the airplane was finally shut down and the crew was able to rest. “Think that sounds like fun? Because I certainly do! “

     As a small child, we all have dreams. Children are adventurous and fascinated by the world, developing new questions and ideas every single day. Unfortunately, the things we dream of most as children rarely last the entirety of our lives. The things you wanted most are likely to change with age and wisdom and what you thought you wanted to become when you were grown had a tendency to change. This however, was not the case for the strong pilot in charge of the Palestinian leader’s Gulfstream jet. The pilot in command of that particular ship was a man by the name of Gregory Hundrup. As a young boy, Greg would look up into the sky whenever he would dream of his future. As a child his very favorite television show was “Sky King” and as far back as Greg can remember he says that he knew one thing for certain and that was his love for airplanes; they fascinated him. He knew, even as a child that he was willing to do whatever it would take to become a pilot; and that is exactly what he did.

     Greg started flying while he was still in high school. Working a part time job in a machine shop, he saved every penny he made and spent them all on flying lessons. In less than one year Greg was able to successfully pass his check ride and in 1967 Greg received his private pilot’s license. Once he graduated from high school in 1970, Greg joined the military, where he worked as an air traffic controller. In 1975, Greg completed his time as an active duty soldier and began working full time as a flight instructor in Dothan, Alabama. In 1977 Greg retired from instruction and took a job flying the co-pilot’s seat of a Learjet 25 for a private charter company.

     Some three years later, Greg stumbled across an advertisement inquiring for a Gulfstream pilot in Saudi Arabia, thinking it was surely a longshot, he applied anyway. “Go big or go home, right?” Greg applied and Greg got it! He was in the big leagues now, hired on as a first officer. Greg Moved to Saudi Arabia and flew the captain’s seat for ten years, then one day, Greg decided to make a career change. He then jumped ship and began flying in Southeast Asia for a family owned flight department where he flew for yet another ten years. Finally, in 2000, Greg went to work for a company known as Franklin Templeton Investments where his job was and still is to fly the company’s international fund manager around the world in search of investment opportunities. The company caters to four individual pilots specifically, and together they make up the fund manager’s personal flight crew, trading on and off shifts every twenty-one days. This means that Greg routinely flies a Gulfstream jet around the entire world for twenty-one days; then he is sent home via airline for another twenty-one days of rest.

    Imagine taking a day trip to Switzerland, then on to dinner in Paris, France; traveling throughout Europe in a week’s time, then on to the Far East for the following weekend. Greg’s life rapidly whips and turns him all the way around the globe; frequently taking trips through multiple countries in a single day. The countries that Greg sees on a daily basis are often places that an average person could never even dream of visiting. Interesting thought; although Europe fascinates me (personally) the most, Greg stated that his favorite part of the world is the Far East. He enjoys the friendly, warm and inviting people of Thailand; the seemingly spotless and safe, international city of Singapore; the lovely and tropical countryside of the Philippines; as well as the variety, shopping and Chinese cuisine in Hong Kong.

    Living this life sounds extravagant and surreal to me; upon asking Greg how he feels about his career, I received the perfect and most ideal answer imaginable. Greg loves his career. Throughout his endeavors, aviation has brought many great things into Greg’s life, including fantastic benefits, a rewarding salary, close friendships and even a loving wife. I asked Greg if he had a “least favorite” thing about his career as an international corporate jet pilot and his answers were “Africa, Russia and India.” (I found that comical.) It is my understanding that the air traffic controllers are less than easy to communicate English with in some of these places; specifically places where Portuguese is the primary language. Fortunately, at the end of the day, all is great on Greg’s end. He had absolutely no complaints regarding his career and that was stand-out fabulous for me to hear! C’mon, how many people do you know that are excited to get up and go to work each day?

    Greg’s twenty-one days in the air are of course followed by twenty-one days on the ground. When Greg is on what he refers to as his “holiday,” he resides at home with his adoring and ever so patient wife in small-town, East Washington State. This is also the place he calls home for his personal Cessna 210 aircraft that he flies recreationally with friends and family.

    Greg’s career is mind blowing to me. Just think, he has adventured completely around the world and then back again; says his company typically travels to an average seventy countries per year and will cruise the entire world in a matter of two-hundred days. We’re not finished yet though pilots, if you’ve got the story, I’ve got the skills. Just sent me an email to email to keely@globalair.com. I’d love to hear from you!

First G650 Delivered

By Russ Niles, Editor-in-Chief
Gulfstream ended the year with a brace of accomplishments for its G650 program that set the stage for a busy 2013 in terms of deliveries. The company delivered its first G650 to a U.S. customer last week. "The first delivery of an aircraft is always an auspicious occasion and this one is especially so. This delivery represents the beginning of a new era in aircraft design and manufacturing in terms of quality, capabilities, reliability, parts availability and maintenance activities," said Gulfstream President Larry Flynn. "We're thrilled to see the first G650 leave our hangar for a customer's. Soon the G650 will be a common sight at airports around the world." The company also closed out the year with a couple of important certifications.

As the first revenue G650 was winging its way home, the FAA granted a production certificate to the Savannah plant for the new jet. Almost simultaneously, EASA certified the G650, meaning deliveries to the 27 member countries can begin immediately. "This is quite an achievement for Gulfstream," said Flynn. The FAA certified it in September. Certifications in other countries are expected to follow quickly.

Nexcelle Completes the Preliminary Design Review forits Nacelle to Equip GE’s Passport Engines on Bombardier Global 7000 and 8000 Business Jets

The Nexcelle joint venture of GE’s Middle River Aircraft Systems and the Safran group’s Aircelle has completed the Preliminary Design Review for its nacelle on the GE Passport engine, marking a major milestone with the integrated propulsion system that will power the Bombardier* Global 7000* and Global 8000* twin-jet business aircraft.

The successful design review was held at Nexcelle’s Cincinnati, Ohio headquarters, with its results announced today.

“With this milestone, Nexcelle has once again demonstrated the capability to execute on the design and development responsibility for its programs,” said Nexcelle President Huntley Myrie. “Our teams also are well advanced in preparing the manufacturing and assembly infrastructure that will handle the Passport engine nacelle production.”

Nexcelle’s Passport nacelle incorporates the expertise of its Aircelle and Middle River Aircraft Systems parent companies, including their capabilities in composites, acoustic treatment and advanced production techniques.

Main nacelle elements include the inner and outer barrel, manufactured with composite materials for weight reduction; a fan cowl produced with composites for both weight reduction and strength; along with a target-type two-door thrust reverser and fixed aft nozzle, which are built largely with composites in a design chosen for both performance and weight reduction.

Among the advanced production techniques to be applied by Nexcelle is a robotic drilling and fastening installation for the nacelle’s inlet assembly to improve productivity, quality and repeatability. The Passport’s thrust reverser will be built on a moving assembly line, which applies techniques similar to those used in the automotive industry for improved production efficiency.

As part of the production preparations, tooling designs for the Passport nacelle are now being released by Nexcelle.

Aircelle will produce its Passport nacelle components at the company’s facilities in France and Morocco; while Middle River Aircraft Systems’ production activity is to include composite parts manufacturing and assembly in an all-new GE shared facility in the United States, which currently is taking form in Ellisville, Mississippi.

About Nexcelle
Nexcelle (nexcelle.com) is creating smart nacelle systems for tomorrow’s world travel. Headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, the company is a 50/50 joint venture of Aircelle and Middle River Aircraft Systems (MRAS), which are leading suppliers of engine nacelles, thrust reversers and aerostructures. Through Nexcelle’s relationship with CFM International, GE Aviation and Safran, the company brings unparalleled expertise in the design, development, production and support of integrated propulsion systems for a wide range of aircraft.

* Trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries.

Media Contact
Jennifer Villarreal, GE Aviation
T: +1 616 241 8643 - E: jennifer.villarreal3[.]ge.com.

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