All posts tagged 'Pilots'

Understanding Spins and How to Properly Recover From Them

So, as promised, I did spin training within the last 2 weeks and got my endorsement. October 3rd to be precise, and it was an absolute blast.

Pictured above is my instructor and I in the Decathlon (excuse my chipmunk cheeks, courtesy of my DC headset pushing on them).

I learned a lot more once I actually went through the ground and flight training with him than I had thought I would. So, let's talk about some concepts that can be overlooked but are still important:

1) In the last post about spin training I wrote about PARE; 

Power idle

Ailerons neutral

Rudder full opposite the direction of the turn

Elevator briskly down

That's pretty much the general knowledge that everyone knows, not much else. Well, what about after the spin is broken? Do you just keep holding in those controls? No.

After applying rudder, you hold it in the opposite direction of the turn. This is what breaks the spin itself. Taking away power and ailerons is only to stay away from aggravating the spin, but those steps won't break it. After breaking the spin, meaning you've stop the turn in that direction, neutralize the rudder. If you don't you'll start a spin in the other direction. Because remember, you're still stalled

As you see the plane breaking out of the spin, then apply your elevator down. Most people think you do all 4 steps at once, but there's a precise time to do each one. Applying the elevator down will then break the stall (if you remember basic stall characteristics, this is reducing the angle of attack). Now smoothly apply your power back in to gain altitude (as you lose it very quickly in a spin) and smoothly bring the nose back up just above to horizon to start climbing.

So, to recap:

After inducing a spin you-

Power idle

Ailerons neutral

Rudder full opposite and hold it until the spin breaks

Elevator down as the spin breaks to then break the stall

Neutralize rudder after breaking spin to stop turn in other direction

Smoothly apply power and bring the nose back up to just above the horizon and start a gentle climb.

Remember that in a real situation to stay calm and remember these procedures, don't panic and try to turn the ailerons or yank the nose up. Follow these steps then be smooth in your recovery so you don't stress out the plane too much. Flying with structural damage would be a whole different ballgame. 

2) Entry into a spin. I feel like that needs to be talked about more! What are the signs you're about to enter a spin? Does it immediately start spiraling to the ground?

To help show what it looks like here's the video I took: https://www.instagram.com/p/B3LQjLpgazG/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link 

I hate to include a link to Instagram but it's the easiest way to share a video!

If you watch it, you'll notice it actually takes some work to induce a spin. First, both wings of the plane have to be stalled. In most spin training flights instructors us a cross-control stall to induce this because it's an easy way to bring it the lack of coordination.

So, you bring the nose up and exceed the critical angle of attack. In a demonstration, you're keeping this coordinated until you're about to induce the actual stall. Then you step on rudder in either direction (the direction you want to spin in) and keep it uncoordinated (ball out of center on your turn coordinator) until the plane buffets and a wing drops. Now, after the wing drops the plane does not immediately enter a crazy death-defying spin to the ground. It's actually a somewhat slow process.

Here, you still have time to react. There are 4 phases of a spin: entry, incipient, developed and recovery. Right here you're in the incipient phase. You've already induced a stall and applied too little/too much rudder. Now as the wing falls it has to have 2-3 turns before it's a fully developed spin. These are somewhat slow turns, when you're in the plane these feel slower than the ones when the plane is in stabilized autorotation. This can also be noted in the video.

These are all some concepts that should be noted for spin training and spin avoidance/recovery. Even if you're not going for a CFI certificate, I recommend to everyone taking at least one spin training course. We, as pilots, make errors. We're not perfect, but we can learn how to counteract our mistakes. 

Not to mention, it's super fun. 

While you may not go do spin training this weekend, you should go do something fun. Check out our calendar and see if there's any fun events going on near you, as I know this weekend we'll be having Wings Over Houston with us at Ellington! 

Happy Landings from all of us at Globalair.com,

-Addi

 

10+ Gift Ideas for Pilots and Aviation Enthusiasts

Pilots and aviators get to do what many of us can only dream of; fly. So what do you get the people who have the ability to soar above the clouds on a weekly basis? A gift for a pilot should be practical... but it must also maintain a level of sentimentality. 

Lucky for you, we have compiled a list of gift ideas that are aviator approved! 

 

Pilot Wings Hat - $15.95

If you've ever worn a baseball cap while flying, you'll immediately understand how much of a pain (literally) it can be to wear a headset and fight with the little button on top.  Not with this stylish hat! This company had the factory leave off the button that is traditionally found on the top of a baseball cap! Perfect for a sunny afternoon flying or spending the day with friends in the hangar.

 

Leather Pilot Log - $62

You've got to make every trip count. Track each flight with our pilot log, handmade from top-grain leather. This product includes either a standard (ASA-SP-30) or master (ASA-SP-6) pilot log. 

If the special pilot in your life prefers maintaining a digital logbook, send them to Globalair.com! Ours is free, easy to use, and is fully downloadable as a text file or CSV file. And the best part is the ability to add as many aircraft profiles as you need!

 

Flight Gear HP iPad Kneeboard - $34.95

The Flight Gear HP iPad Kneeboard holds the iPad right where you need it - secure on your leg but easily within reach. An integrated kickstand means you can tilt the iPad towards you, which helps to reduce glare. A simple hook-and-loop rotation mechanism allows for portrait or landscape viewing. 

 

Personalized Bobblehead in Flight Suit - $65

Personalize a bobblehead to look just like your favorite aviator. Simply send in images of the person you want the bobblehead to be crafted after and you will receive a custom look-alike. This bobblehead will come in an Air Force uniform. 

 

Set of 5 Aircraft Posters - $21.99

These patent art prints are printed on acid-free matte paper with high-quality archival inks. The prints are shipped in a durable shipping tube and rolled to ensure they don't crease. Perfect for wall decor in a home, bedroom, or college dorm. 

 

Aviator Engraved Whiskey Set - $69.95

This personalized gift for pilots is a unique way to thank the favorite aviator in your life. Each box is made from American Maplewood with sturdy metal hinges. Inside are two custom whiskey glasses and 9 whiskey stones. Includes personalization of the engraved box and glasses with the name and year for an unforgettable gift. The Maplewood box measures 11.25” x 5.5” x 4”. Each whiskey glass is 4” tall and can hold up to 10 ounces. (Liquor not included).

 

Airplane Propeller Replica 47" - $170+

This personalized wood airplane propeller wall hanging is custom designed with hand-engraved personalization and custom colors.  Wooden airplane propellers are the perfect gift for a retiring pilot, new pilot, or for travel themed weddings.

 

Airplane Keychain - $16.99

This key chain is an awesome gift for a pilot, airman, flight attendant, anyone in the air force or for anyone who loves to travel. It features a 1-inch 20 gauge stainless steel round disc stamped with "Have a safe flight I love you Love, (Name of your choice)” and a 1 3/4 inch x 2-inch antique silver-plated metal airplane charm on a 1-inch key ring. 

 

Red Canoe Cessna Stow Bag - $79.99

The Cessna Stow fits a headset, navigational tools and your pilot operating handbook as easily as your gym gear. It is the perfect gift for the pilot who spends more time on his plane than he does at home.

 

Vintage Instrument Coasters - $21.95

These vintage instrument coasters would look great on any pilot's coffee table. They are made with scratch resistant acrylic and have non-skid rubber feet. Designed to look like vintage aviation instruments and comes in a set of 6.

 

Pilot Humor Mug - $16.85

This is the perfect gift for your aviater pilot to use for pre-flight coffee. It will surely put a smile on their face as they try to remember the correct way to spell 'aviator'. 

 

Principles of Flight Tie - $28

Fly into your next business meeting or night on the town with this silk tie that sports the graphic principles of flight. This tie is the perfect accessory for an aviator, science teacher, or anyone with his head in the clouds. 100% silk; fully lined.

 

Spark Plug Plane Paperweight - $35

Recycled spark plugs, butter knives, and nuts and bolts are welded together into the shape of an airplane, giving this mini-sculpture the power to take off with the conversation as it taxis around your desk, workshop or tool shed. It can be used as a paperweight or a simple desk ornament.

 

Pilot Humor T-Shirt - $20

Show the world how much you love aircraft with this funny t-shirt. Available in multiple sizes and colors.

 

At the end of the day, it doesn't matter how much you spend on the gift. All that matters is celebrating the love you have for that person... and for aviation. Don't stress wondering if the gift is perfect. If it is coming from you, it surely will be!

Do you have a favorite aviation-themed gift that you’ve received or a gift that you were proud to have found for someone else? Let us know in the comments below!

All prices are current at the time of posting. 
 

Got Gas? Tell the World!

When scanning the airports on GlobalAir.com’s Airport Resource Center, you may notice that some FBOs are promoted at both the top and bottom of the website. Why is that? Read on!

Is your FBO taking advantage of websites that promote your services and fuel prices? It should be! Not only is this a (virtually) free medium to let pilots know who you are and where you are, but it lets everyone know your personality and puts a human face on your company. And if you’ve been in the aviation business for a while, you know the value of being known personally.

The great news – you don’t have to dump a lot of your valuable time into self-promotion online to get something out of it. Many of the services available you can spend as little as 5 minutes a MONTH to make work for you! Do remember that the more you put into anything, the more you get out of it – but in the fast-paced online world, having NO presence is a bigger crime than having a minimal presence. Think back 20 years and imagine not being listed in the phone book, and the impact that would have had on your company!

Possibly the easiest thing you can start doing to increase attention for your FBO is to frequently update your fuel prices online. I’ve heard too many times, "My fuel prices rarely change, so why bother?" Simple answer – pilots don’t know that! If they see that it’s been three months since you last updated your prices, they are going to assume that you don’t care enough to inform them long before they assume that the price is unchanged – are you sure you want to give that impression?

Every FBO that sells fuel should have their own page on GlobalAir.com that only they are allowed to update – and freely promote their facility. Make sure that all your information is accurate by going to this link, typing in your identifier code, then clicking on the link to your FBO to view how the world sees it. If there’s a lot of missing information, that’s easily remedied by logging in and adding what is missing.

Many points of interest can be added include which credit cards you accept, if you have courtesy cars or access to rental cars on site, what (if any) ramp fees you have, direct access to your website, and an interactive Google map to your location, and much more. Here is a great example of an FBO taking advantage of many of these free services.

Ok, let’s say you’re been around the block for a while now, and you’re ready to invest in the image of your FBO. Or you’ve taken the time to talk with your fuel provider and fuel card services to discover that they will reimburse you for some advertising you do (you HAVE done that, haven’t you?). Time to step up your presence by adding your logo, some photos of that facility you just upgraded, all the featured services and cards accepted and more – maybe even have your logo on the airport page itself! Here’s an example of an FBO that is going the extra mile to showcase everything they have to offer.

Finally, don’t forget to let all your friends know about your FBO using social media. While you can copy and paste links to your page, many sites like GlobalAir.com make it easy by including quick links to all the popular social media sites – just take a quick look around the page. You can’t get any simpler than this to let the world know where they can find the gas (and more) they are seeking!

Ready to show off your favorite FBO on social media sites? You will find quick links to do so on the bottom of the page!

Sleep Apnea and Flying - A Summary of the Situation

In a recent FAA newsletter, Federal Air Surgeon Dr. Frederick Tilton reported the FAA "will be releasing shortly" a policy requiring that pilots with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or greater, and a neck size of 17 inches or greater, undergo screening for sleep apnea prior to receiving a medical certificate. Tilton’s newsletter commentary adds that, over time, additional pilots would be required to submit to OSA screening, as the agency lowers the BMI threshold.

Here’s a link to the newsletter:

AOPA and EAA reacted to the announced policy with strongly worded letters "demanding" that it be suspended. They argued that the policy addresses a problem that exceeds the Federal Flight Surgeon’s mandate, could add a financial burden to the pilot community, and hasn’t been proven to exist. AOPA Thursday expressed its support for the House’s legislation and added some choice words. AOPA president Mark Baker said, "The policy change is arbitrary and capricious and doesn’t make sense given the data." AOPA says that a review of ten years of general aviation accident data "found no cases in which sleep apnea was a causal or contributing factor."

Less than a week ago, U.S. House of Representatives aviation subcommittee chairman Frank LoBiondo (R-2 NJ) introduced H.R. 3578 – legislation that would compel the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) "to ensure that any new or revised requirement providing for the screening, testing, or treatment of an airman or an air traffic controller for a sleep disorder is adopted pursuant to a rulemaking proceeding, and for other purposes." "We thank Representative LoBiondo and other House lawmakers for recognizing that a policy of this magnitude must be vetted through the established rulemaking process, which has proven to be effective so many times in the past," NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen said. "It is imperative that any new burden on aviators, in this case pilots, be thoroughly analyzed in consultation with stakeholders." LoBiondo’s measure has been referred to the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Where do you stand on this? If you suffer from sleep apnea, does it impact your performance as a pilot?

UPDATE 12-5-13: The NBAA welcomes the House Committee passage of H.R. 3578 here.

UPDATE 12-9-13: Advanced Aircrew Academy has an excellent blog posting regarding obtaining the special issuance of an FAA Medical with sleep apnea here.

UPDATE 12-10-13: The Civil Aviation Medical Association (CAMA), the professional organization for Aviation Medical Examiners who provide medical certification exams to the nation's pilots, has joined the consensus against the FAA's new sleep apnea policy announced last month. More information on the EAA's website here.

UPDATE 12-11-13: Reps. Todd Rokita (R-IN) and Sam Graves (R-MO) introduced a bill in the U.S. House today that seeks to abolish the third-class medical certificate for many pilots who fly recreationally. The General Aviation Pilot Protection Act of 2013, co-sponsored by Reps. Bill Flores (R-TX), Mike Pompeo (R-KS), Collin Peterson (D-MN), and Richard Hanna (R-NY), would require pilots who fly recreationally to hold a valid driver's license in lieu of a third-class medical certificate and operate under specific limitations.

UPDATE 12-13-13: During a Dec. 12 webinar presentation to discuss the agency's controversial new OSA-screening proposal with industry stakeholders, Federal Air Surgeon Dr. Frederick Tilton appeared determined to push ahead with the requirements. "If Congress passes a law [forcing industry consultation], we’ll be compliant with it," Tilton said during the webinar. "Until they do so, we will move forward with this." For more on this new development, plus the NBAA's reaction, she their press release here.

UPDATE 12-20-13: The FAA will delay implementation of its new sleep apnea policy planned for next month in order to gather additional input from the aviation and medical community. For more information, as well as the EAA's reaction, click here.

UPDATE 3-6-14: The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) joined a coalition of aviation groups this week in calling for swift passage of U.S. Senate legislation aimed at bringing transparency to any decision by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to implement mandatory testing of pilots and air traffic controllers for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before receiving a medical certificate.

"As aviation community stakeholders, we are writing to express our support for S.1941, commonsense bipartisan legislation to address the sweeping [FAA] proposal to change the policy on sleep apnea for pilots and air traffic controllers without the benefit of a rulemaking process," reads the March 4 letter to senators. "Further, we wish to express our collective hope that passing this important bill in a timely fashion will be a priority for the U.S. Senate in the coming weeks." Read the coalition's letter in its entirety here.

Red Bull Flies Again!

The Red Bull Air Race World Championship features the world's best race pilots in a pure motor-sport competition that combines speed, precision and skill. Using the fastest, most agile and lightweight racing planes, pilots navigate a low-level aerial track made up of air-filled pylons. Now the race is set to return in February 2014 with a full seven-race World Championship taking place in six different countries – in the U.S. they will take place in Dallas/Fort Worth on September 6th and Las Vegas on October 11th, 2014. It’s return was announced at the Putrajaya Maritime Centre in Malaysia on October 8th.

The Red Bull Air Race World Championship comes to Las Vegas in October, 2014.

There have been several improvements, including standard engines and props for all pilots, changes to the pylons for safety, and a few rule changes. A new highlight is the Challengers Cup, giving pilots who qualify experience racing on the tracks.

Reigning champion Paul Bonhomme of Britain won the last two competitions in 2009 and 2010, and he will be seeking a third-straight win in the 2014 competition.

For more information on the Red Bull Air Race World Championship, click here.

UPDATE - Tickets are now available through RedBullAirRace.com, Ticketmaster.com, lvms.com, texasmotorspeedway.com and in person at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway box office (800-644-4444) and Texas Motor Speedway box office (817-215-8500).

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