All posts tagged 'Pilots' - Page 5

WSJ: Two commuter jets did not start second engine prior to takeoff

As we mentioned earlier today, the NTSB is in the process of hearing advice from experts on how to ensure pilots receive proper training and to ensure safety.

On the heels of this comes a report in the Wall Street Journal that two commuter airlines did not start a second engine prior to takeoff.

The pilots avoided emergencies in each case by turning off the runway before accelerating to takeoff speed.

In the wake of the Colgan and Comair crashes, these incidents further prove at the very least that such discussions are crucial to ensure competent pilots are behind the yokes.

At the most, combined with the warning in the earlier release from the panel that experience and integrity could decline, it sends an alarm that more must be done sooner than later to enforce proper training, whether by airline company mandate, FAA mandate or any guideline in between.

Sound off on what you think about the situation in the comments section below.    

Aviation News Rundown: Beware of future airline pilots? and Learn to Fly Day (maybe one can fix the other)

A panel of experts at an aviation safety forum this week issued a scary scenario for the sky in future commercial aviation. They told the NTSB that future pilots at airlines could be, in general, less experienced and ethical amidst an industry in which the workers will be in high demand as airlines begin hiring again.

The Associated Press reports in its coverage of the forum that the hardest hit will be regional airlines, which employ pilots with less experience at lower salaries. Fewer college students and military pilots are looking for work at airlines, as 42,000 pilots will need to be hired over the next 10 years. Flights will still need to be made, and some fear that this could compromise qualifications.

In other news, the FAA says widespread NexGen upgrades will come a little more quickly than initially anticipated. Quoted in the Dallas Morning News, Federal Aviation Administrator Randy Babbitt told the American Association of Airport Executives that the bulk of improvements will have occurred by 2016 rather than the forecasted 2018, as airlines rush to be competitive with advanced gear as the transition snowballs.

The first-ever International Learn to Fly Day (website) appears to have been a smashing success, as 40,000 people attended 450 events nationwide, according to the EAA. Check out coverage of events in Gainesville, Fla., Austin, Minn., and Fitchburg, Mass., where a flying car drew a crowd. 

Perhaps programs like this will help ensure the next generation of pilots are, in fact, experienced and ethical.  

Aviation News Rundown: Tornado chasing UAV, Travolta's dogs killed at airport


Photo courtesy of Jaunted.com, widely distributed on the Web

One of the biggest stories in aviation today is the third nomination of a potential TSA chief from the Obama administration. We run down links to various outlets’ coverage here.

In what has to be one of the coolest technological feats in aviation recently, tornado chasers from the University of Colorado flew an unmanned aircraft into a super-cell thunderstorm. The byproduct of this will hopefully be better research of how life-threatening storms are formed without putting researchers into harm’s way.

Part of the reason folks chase such storms has to be the thrill of it. Yet controlling a UAV through massive downbursts has its own enticements, too.

In a sad piece of aviation news, two dogs owned by actor and pilot John Travolta were killed last week by a service vehicle at Bangor International Airport (BGR). Travolta owns a home off the Maine coast.

In the world of business aviation, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week runs through an intriguing list of news tidbits, noting that NATA and others are not happy with GA having only one representative on the DOT aviation panel. Read that, along with news from Hawker Beechcraft, Korean Aerospace and GE Aviation here.

Boeing patted itself on the back this week for reducing CO2 emissions at U.S. facilities by 31 percent since 2002. The company seeks to add to this number with the deployment of its 787s and 747-8 series.

Finally, our friends at Duncan Aviation look further into the complicated quandary known as WAAS, expanding on why LPV approaches with the system require two FMSs and two GPS receivers. Check it out at this link.  

Cashing in on that $100 hamburger

With the weekend finally here, many recreational pilots will take to the sky with a tiding of good weather in search of that ever-allusive $100 hamburger.

While fuel and rental costs mean that burger likely will cost $200 or more, it’s the thrill of the flight that certainly outweighs the cost of getting to the meal.

Enjoy the journey, not the destination, right?

There are several great sites online to assist in finding where to land for that pancake, burger or whatever meal you desire, many of them featuring user feedback to know what others think of a place. Such tools help eliminate the dread of flying two hours to an unknown spot only to receive poor service.

Of course, right here on our site you can plug your destination into our Airport Resource Center and find a rental car, hotel, $100 hamburger, FBO or any other service you may need after landing. And our Max-Trax software is built to save you money on fuel along your route.

Other great sites for the pilot with the picky palette include Fly2Lunch.com. It features a great search tool, and its only setback is the lack of information at listed airports. (There are no diners listed on the site for FXE, FLL, OSH or even our beloved LOU).  

AdventurePilot.com provides a useful virtual map. Users plug in a home airport and set a nautical-mile radius. Press enter and see dozens, if not hundreds, of surrounding spots to play, eat, and sleep.

Perhaps the most simple and user-interactive $100 hamburger site is Flyingfood.com. Starting with its national map, a navigator can double click to zoom to a particular region, honing in on user-reviewed eateries. The numbers hovering above a location indicate the user rating of a spot.

Perhaps these tools keep you a happy pilot and never a hungry pilot.

If you happen to be flying to Louisville, I strongly recommend a stop at W.W. Cousins for your $100 hamburger. The staff cooks delicious burgers to order and bakes buns and desserts on site. A mile-long topping bar lets you pile on anything under the sun, from sweet pepper relish, jalapenos, Dusseldorf mustard and even fancy ketchup, you will find it all.

And it’s only a mile from Bowman Field. Perfect.

Please let us know about your endeavors to get a $100 (or however much it costs) hamburger in the comments section. And happy flying.

Tense exchange between ATC and pilot at JFK

A recording posted on LiveATC.net Wednesday evening dictates an American Airlines Boeing 767 pilot telling the tower at JFK airport that he will declare an emergency if he cannot land on a particular runway.

From a New York Post article:

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