All posts tagged 'Single Engine'

How to Counteract an Engine Failure in Flight

First, let me start out by saying that this article is for single engine flying. I'll write another one on multi engine plane engine failures in the future.

I had this talk recently with a fellow CFI I work with on the biggest issues we see in student training. Engine failures aren't taken seriously because they don't happen too often. It's also because in your typical general aviation planes you have a good glide ratio, so rather than being quick people take their time running checklists and securing the plane in simulated engine outs. 

I GUARANTEE you during an ACTUAL engine failure you won't be taking your time, but instead immediately going through how you trained it. Did you train it nonchalantly and running checklist super slow? I hope not. So let's talk about what to do:

The acronym you want to memorize for engine failures is ABC. Kinda comical how simple it is, but it could save your life one day!

A is for airspeed. The VERY SECOND your engine fails, pitch for glide speed. Glide speed is published by the manufacturer to be at the maximum lift/drag ratio to give the pilot the greatest gliding distance available. At this point, you're not gaining any altitude. But giving yourself the most horizontal distance available to find a good spot to land is key.

B is for best place to land. As soon as you start bringing the nose up or down for glide speed and trimming for it, take a look outside and see where you're going to land. If you're struggling to find an airport, glance at your GPS if you have a screen onboard. You might be right on top of an airport without knowing it. If not, then keep looking outside. Anything like a field, road, coastline etc. can be a good spot. Some tips on what to watch out for is if you can help it don't pick a field full of trees, a marshy area, watch out for power lines over the road, and of course the obvious always avoid buildings/structures. 

C is checklist. Yes, now that the plane is secured lets see why we lost that engine! Commit your checklist to memory and do it from memory first and then check yourself on paper after doing one run through. This way you aren't stuck reading one item at a time and wasting time as you're losing altitude. Commit your checklists and run them like a machine: no time is wasted that doesn't need to be.

The same CFI I talked with about this experienced a real engine failure once. He told me "wow, no one prepared me for how absolutely quiet it gets when that engine stops." And I guess that's something I never thought about before. What will it be like when it actually happens? A CFI won't be there next to you with their favorite "you just lost an engine" grin.....no, just you and some dead pistons. He immediately did ABC and once he switched fuel tanks and restarted the plane it refired. Turns out there was a clog in the fuel lines on one tank, and switching to another fixed the issue. He was able to do this from memory and pretty much had no need for the paper checklist, although he still went through after to verify everything was secured as called for. 

He stuck to his training, and it saved his life.

So to end this post I ask, how do you train for an engine failure? Do you think it would save your life the method you're using? Have fun with flight training, but also take it seriously and make sure you learn something valuable each time you go up!



Don't forget our Globalair.com Scholarship is accepting applications through August, we hope to see you apply!

Flight Design Celebrates 25 Years

Special Limited Edition 'Jubilee' Models Offered Worldwide
Article By: www.aero-news.net

While the U.S. Light-Sport Aircraft sector is just eight years old, and the first FAA-accepted aircraft began arriving in 2005, Flight Design GmbH has been involved with aircraft development and manufacturing aircraft for 25 years. To mark this milestone, the company is offering a special “Jubilee” series of their models with unique features and value pricing.

This will be a global celebration of Flight Design’s 25th Anniversary. “It has been an exciting 25 years where we brought interesting new airplanes to markets around the world,” said Flight Design CEO Matthias Betsch. “For this anniversary we have a special model created expressly for our worldwide dealership partners and their customers.”

Flight Design will build the special Jubilee edition in a very limited series of airplanes. The specially constructed airplanes add a personal touch, a unique equipment list, and special pricing. The Jubilee treatment can be applied to any of several models in production, including CTLSi, CTSLi (Supralight) or MCi. To insure quality and desirability, only 25 Jubilee airplane models will be manufactured.

“Each 25th Anniversary Jubilee airplane will have an upper management ‘Godfather’ assigned to personally monitor its build process to ensure our extraordinary level of quality is attained throughout every step and detail of manufacturing,” said Betsch. Jubilee models will have a special inscription plate affixed with signatures of Flight Design’s top managers, the name of that aircraft’s “Godfather” and its sequential number within the series of 25 models built for the celebration.

Flight Design’s 25th Anniversary Jubilee airplanes will have the following standard features: Rotax 912iS engine; Dynon SkyView avionics, dual 10-inch displays (for LSA/EASA 1,320-pound CTLSi and MCi) or dual 7-inch displays for CTLSi at 1,040-pound, or single 10-inch display for CTSLi; Dynon autopilot; 8.33-kHz communications radio with Mode S transponder; Garmin 796/795 GPS; electric stabilator trim; two upgraded Bose A20 Active Noise Reduction (ANR) headsets; input capability for mobile phone and music; special two-tone leather interior, including leather instrument panel and carpeting similar to the interior in Flight Design’s new four-seat C4 mock-up as seen at airshows; and, a special 25th Anniversary theme exterior design painted on aircraft (not decals) with 25th Anniversary commemorative logo. A special series of options is also available at attractive prices. An extended warranty of five years for structural parts and three years for mechanical parts plus a 25th Anniversary leather flight brief case will complete the limited edition airplanes.

“These will be very special airplanes,” said U.S. Sales Manager John Gilmore. “As they are offered around the world, only a small number are available for U.S. buyers. Having one of these Jubilee airplanes with their distinctive exterior paint design and special equipment will make them highly memorable and desirable.”

The program is available effective immediately until the 25th Jubilee airplane is built with delivery occurring from February to June, 2013 at the rate of five airplanes per month.

(File photo provided by Flight Design)
FMI: www.flightdesignusa.com

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