All posts tagged 'WAAS' - Page 2

The Importance of WAAS/LPV

Don’t Let Less Than Ideal Conditions Ruin Your Approach
John Crabtree of Elliott Aviation, Avionics Manager
www.elliottaviation.com

Sometimes, one experience can change your entire perspective on flying. A few years ago, a Hawker 800 pilot relayed a story to me about WAAS LPV. The pilot had been requesting WAAS/LPV in their aircraft but had been denied his request because the aircraft owner saw it as a high cost with very little value. One business trip from Nashville to St. Louis changed the value seen in LPV.

The aircraft owners were flying in for a very important business meeting and planned to land at Lambert Field but the ILS was down and there was a very low ceiling. This forced the aircraft to divert to an airport many miles away. Meanwhile, the owner witnessed a Cirrus land right after their missed approach.

Because it was an unplanned arrival at a very small FBO, they had to wait for a car to become available and drive nearly an hour out of their way, missing their meeting. Needless to say, the owner was very upset that his mid-sized jet could not get into an airport while he witnessed a small piston aircraft land with ease. The owner scheduled a WAAS LPV system installation the following day.

WAAS (wide area augmentation system) and LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) is a system that uses satellites and ground-based radio systems to enhance GPS signals for the entire flight path of the aircraft, including approaches that can get you down to 200 feet. From an approach standpoint, the FAA’s most recent update (November 15, 2012) shows LPV approaches at 1,519 airports including 1,307 LPV’s to non-ILS airports. This flexibility can get you closer where you want to go.

Other benefits include cutting distances between airports, saving time and fuel because the aircraft does not have to follow routes based on ground based systems alone. It also allows safer flight at low altitudes because older system equipment is often blocked by terrain or elevation changes. Simply put, WAAS will get you to where you want to go faster, safer, and often times with less fuel.

John Crabtree oversees over 30 avionics technicians at Elliott Aviation’s headquarters in Moline, IL. Crabtree has 28 years of avionics experience that started in the US Navy where he was an Avionics Technician. He has worked on avionics systems with Gulfstream, Standard Aero and Hawker Beechcraft Services. As part of John’s current duties, he is leading one of the most successful avionics retrofit programs in history, Elliott Aviation’s industry-leading King Air Garmin G1000 retrofit program.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

Aviation News Rundown: Tornado chasing UAV, Travolta's dogs killed at airport


Photo courtesy of Jaunted.com, widely distributed on the Web

One of the biggest stories in aviation today is the third nomination of a potential TSA chief from the Obama administration. We run down links to various outlets’ coverage here.

In what has to be one of the coolest technological feats in aviation recently, tornado chasers from the University of Colorado flew an unmanned aircraft into a super-cell thunderstorm. The byproduct of this will hopefully be better research of how life-threatening storms are formed without putting researchers into harm’s way.

Part of the reason folks chase such storms has to be the thrill of it. Yet controlling a UAV through massive downbursts has its own enticements, too.

In a sad piece of aviation news, two dogs owned by actor and pilot John Travolta were killed last week by a service vehicle at Bangor International Airport (BGR). Travolta owns a home off the Maine coast.

In the world of business aviation, Benet Wilson of Aviation Week runs through an intriguing list of news tidbits, noting that NATA and others are not happy with GA having only one representative on the DOT aviation panel. Read that, along with news from Hawker Beechcraft, Korean Aerospace and GE Aviation here.

Boeing patted itself on the back this week for reducing CO2 emissions at U.S. facilities by 31 percent since 2002. The company seeks to add to this number with the deployment of its 787s and 747-8 series.

Finally, our friends at Duncan Aviation look further into the complicated quandary known as WAAS, expanding on why LPV approaches with the system require two FMSs and two GPS receivers. Check it out at this link.  

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