All posts tagged 'aviation' - Page 12

Learjet 75 Aircraft Set for World Debut at EBACE 2013


MONTREAL, QUEBEC--(Marketwired - May 10, 2013) -

Bombardier Aerospace announced today that just one year after launching the Learjet 70 and Learjet 75 aircraft, it is returning to this year's edition of EBACE with the first production Learjet 75 jet. Alongside the debutante will be three additional class-leading jets.

The Challenger 300, Challenger 605 and Global 6000 aircraft will all be on display from May 21 - May 23, 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland at the 13th European Business Aviation Conference and Exhibition.

"This year's edition of EBACE will once again highlight Bombardier's leadership in the industry," said Steve Ridolfi, President, Bombardier Business Aircraft. "The debut of the Learjet 75 aircraft marks another exciting year of innovation and we look forward to delivering the first aircraft in the fourth quarter of this year."

Growing Support Network to Put Customers First

Bombardier Customer Services team members will be on hand to highlight the continuing growth of its comprehensive support network. Within the past year, the team has converted its Frankfurt parts depot to a full-service hub to accommodate a wider range of parts transactions, opened a business aircraft-focused Regional Support Office in Farnborough, U.K. and continued to drive greater volume and capabilities at its wholly owned Service Centre in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Bombardier Aircraft on Static Display at EBACE 2013

Learjet 75 aircraft: The Learjet 75 jet features the pioneering Bombardier Vision Flight Deck with an interior influenced from its bigger stablemate, the Learjet 85 aircraft. This jet will soar above the traffic with a maximum altitude of 51,000 ft (15,545 m) and is capable of flying more than 2,000nm (3,704km)(i) between Geneva and Cairo non-stop(i).

Challenger 300 aircraft: The dependable Challenger 300 jet offers true transcontinental range and superior long-range cruise speed, with eight-to-10 passengers. Its 3,065nm (5,646km) range connects Geneva with Dubai non-stop and NBAA IFR reserves. Its superior airfield performance allows it to operate out of 5,000 ft (1,524 m) runways with ease(i). The Challenger 300 jet offers the best performance and value in its class, combined with a dispatch reliability that has consistently been above 99.7 per cent, it has exceeded customer expectations since its entry-into-service in 2004.

Challenger 605 aircraft: The revered Challenger 605 jet builds upon the legacy of productivity, quality and reliability of its predecessor, the peerless Challenger 604 jet. Leading its market share segment throughout the world, the Challenger 605 aircraft features one of the widest stand-up cabins of any large category business jet available today and can soar six passengers 4,000 nm (7,408 km) from Geneva to Montreal(i).

Global 6000 aircraft: The Global 6000 jet's large cabin size and levels of comfort, combined with an optional stand-up shower and the Bombardier Vision Flight Deck, offers a perfect blend of high-speed range capability and traveller comfort. Offering the ultimate in technology, this intrepid jet can link Geneva with Tokyo and Geneva with Sao Paulo, non-stop, with eight passengers and three to four crew aboard(i).

Confirmed Media Activities

Monday, May 20, 2013, 11:00 - 12:00
Bombardier Business Aircraft Press Conference
Hall 7 - Bombardier Booth #7011

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 10:00 - 11:00
Bombardier Business Aircraft Press Conference
Hall 7 - Bombardier Booth #7011

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 16:30 - 18:30
Customer Services Cocktail
Hall 7 - Bombardier Booth #7011


About Bombardier
Bombardier is the world's only manufacturer of both planes and trains. Looking far ahead while delivering today, Bombardier is evolving mobility worldwide by answering the call for more efficient, sustainable and enjoyable transportation everywhere. Our vehicles, services and, most of all, our employees are what make us a global leader in transportation.

Bombardier is headquartered in Montreal, Canada. Our shares are traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange (BBD) and we are listed on the Dow Jones Sustainability World and North America Indexes. In the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, we posted revenues of $16.8 billion. News and information are available at bombardier.com or follow us on Twitter @Bombardier.

Notes to editors
Follow @Bombardier_Aero on Twitter to receive the latest news and updates from Bombardier Aerospace.

(i)Under certain operating conditions.

Bombardier, Bombardier Vision, Challenger, Challenger 300, Challenger 604, Challenger 605, Global, Global 6000, Learjet, Learjet 70, Learjet 75, and The Evolution of Mobility are trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries.

To view the photo associated with this press release, please visit the following link: https://media3.marketwire.com/docs/BBD-Learjet75.jpg.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
Annie Cossette Bombardier Business Aircraft
+1-514-855-4388
[email protected]
Virtual press kit: www.bbapress.com
www.bombardier.com

 

Exploring the “Despicablimp”

Ray Robinson, West Coast/International Sales Manager at GlobalAir.com

   One of the many great pleasures of being located directly on the Bowman Field Airport (KLOU) is the fantastic opportunities that we have to see rare things! Spring time in the beautiful state of Kentucky means just one thing; Kentucky Derby time! The entire month of April is devoted to airshows, parties on the river, concerts, marathons, and so much more all in celebration and leading up to the first Saturday in May. This is the big day! During this time, here at Bowman field, we’ve got first row seats to all of the best action in aviation. Not only do we get the opportunity to watch planes come in and take off in preparation for the various ceremonies, but we also get opportunities to meet with and watch stunt flyers as they practice for Thunder Over Louisville, (an annual airshow/fireworks display that kicks off the Derby festival in mid-April.) Sometimes, if we’re lucky we can even catch footage of planes as they swoop in and snag the banners that they promote high above Churchill Downs. All of this is fantastic; however, our favorite parts are the special times when we get to see brand new, different and unique sides of aviation – like the Despicablimp.

   The Despicablimp is traveling across the nation promoting the summer release of “Despicable Me 2”, the animated movie starring the voices of Steve Carell, Al Pacino, Kristen Wiig and Russell Brand. Arguably, the most popular features of the movie are the Minions, which are small, yellow creatures that wear goggles and overalls. These characters are the comic relief that bring comedy to each and every moment they are on the screen. So, what better way to get the word out than with a giant floating minion?

   We spoke with blimp pilot Allan Judd to get an idea of what life with “Stuart,” the Despicablimp, was like. Surprisingly, one word that he never Judd compared his Blimp to was aircraft. “This is much more like piloting a submarine; imagine an upside-down picture with the sky as the ocean, and the land as the surface” he states.

   Judd gave us a simple 101 lesson over how the blimp works. “The helium in the envelope displaces around four tons of air – this makes it buoyant. We simply fill and empty a bladder inside the envelope, called a ballonet; this controls the balloon’s lift and pitch. This can be compared to that last bit of helium that’s added to mylar balloons that you may purchase from flower stores. It is this last bit of helium which will remove all wrinkles from the edges.” For thrust, the 150 ft. long blimp is propelled thru the air by two Lycoming 10-360 engines with additional oil coolers.

   What determines whether or not a blimp will launch? “Whether or not we can successfully bring it back to safe harbor,” says Judd. “If the weather conditions are such that we can’t hook back up to the mooring mast, then we will not be launching.” And the mooring mast is incredibly sturdy – the stakes that hold it are over 3 ft. long and are screwed deep into the ground. When the blimp is secured to it, it can withstand 100 mph winds.” If the pilot and the Mast Headsman (the man that releases and connects the blimp to the mooring mast) determine that the conditions are not good, they don’t fly.

   The Despicablimp crew includes 15 members on site, each of which have different jobs managing the day-to-day aspects of prepping the blimp including, launching and securing it to the mooring mast, and driving the equipment to the next landing spot. Much like a submarine crew, they do everything together while they are on the road. There is also another crew of 15 stationed at the company’s headquarters in Orlando, Florida. This crew handles the behind the scenes work, such as arranging hotel accommodations as well as schedules for the on-site crew.

   I would like to thank Allen Judd and the entire Despicablimp crew for taking some time with us on their busy day. Not only did we learn about the functionality and science behind the scenes, but we were actually invited to sit in the pilot’s seat and given the full tour. Plus we recorded an amazing video of the blimp taking off and circling back – make sure to watch that as well!

Don’t forget to see Despicable Me in a theater near you; due to hit the box office July 3, 2013!

For more information on the Despicablimp:

Despicablimp Command Center - www.despicablimp.com

Despicablimp Twitter feed - twitter.com/Despicablimp

Despicable Me 2 official site - despicableme.com

How Blimps Work - science.howstuffworks.com/transport/flight/modern/blimp.htm

For more photography, visit our Facebook page!: www.facebook.com/GlobalAir

(Additional reporting by Keely Mick)

Jim and Matt

Allen Judd as he teaches Ray a few "Blimp 101 Fundamentals."

Jim and Matt

Meet "Stuart!"



Embraer Executive Jets Delivers First Signature Series™ Phenom 300 to NetJets, Inc.

“The NetJets delivery is a significant milestone in the Phenom 300 program,” said Ernest Edwards, President Embraer Executive Jets. “NetJets’ US$1 billion order came just a year after the aircraft entered service. It was a significant validation that Embraer Executive Jets had delivered to the market an aircraft that meets NetJets increasingly demanding requirements for safety, comfort, economics, performance and reliability. We are especially pleased that we will begin producing the NetJets’ Signature Series™ Phenom 300s on the Melbourne production line in 2014.”

The delivery was part of an order that included 50 firm orders and 75 options, signed in October 2010 creating a partnership that would develop into the NetJets’ Signature Series™ Phenom 300. The pioneer and world leader in private aviation has specified an aircraft that features advanced technologies to ensure maximum safety, reliability and operating efficiency as well as superior cabin comfort, advanced inflight entertainment systems and custom cabin designs. The aircraft will join NetJets’ worldwide fleet of more than 700 light, midsize and large-cabin aircraft.

“We are pleased to partner with Embraer to deliver our customers the NetJets Signature Series™ Phenom 300, an outstanding light-cabin jet designed exclusively for NetJets,” said Jordan B. Hansell, NetJets Chairman and CEO. “The high-performance aircraft is ideally suited to our customers’ needs for safety, reliability, interior comfort and operating efficiency. The addition of the Signature Series™ Phenom 300 will expand the unparalleled offerings and capabilities of the NetJets global fleet.”

NetJets’Signature Series™ Phenom 300 will include the Prodigy Touch Flight Deck, based on the Garmin 3000 platform. The Prodigy Touch flight deck provides enhanced pilot interface and situational awareness. This marks the first-in-service application of this advanced avionics system.

NetJets’ Signature Series™ Phenom 300 also has cabin features that were developed exclusively for NetJets to meet specific operating requirements and their discerning customers’ needs for reliability, range, interior comfort and operating efficiency. The aircraft seats up to seven passengers, features a full refreshment center, custom cabin amenities including a customized galley, advanced inflight entertainment systems, WiFi and a fully enclosed aft lavatory.

Production of the NetJets’ Signature SeriesTM Phenom 300 will be moved to Embraer Executive Jets’ Melbourne, FL assembly and paint facility in 2014. The production line opened in 2011, and, with the development of the nearby customer center, added more than 200 jobs to the community which had been hard hit by the closure of NASA’s shuttle program.

Judged one of the top 15 most influential business aircraft of all time by industry press, the light Phenom 300 is the roomiest in its class. The eight- to 11-seat aircraft has the best climb and field performance for any light jet. It is designed for 15% lower operating costs and offers the most range and speed in its class. The Phenom 300, as with all Embraer Executive Jet aircraft, sets a new standard for light business jets and is the recipient of many international design and innovation awards. It can fly at an altitude of up to 45,000 feet (13,716 meters) and has a range of 1,971 nautical miles (3,650 km), including NBAA IFR fuel reserves, which means the aircraft is capable of flying nonstop from New York to Dallas or Houston to Los Angeles.

About NetJets® Inc. NetJets® Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway® company, is the worldwide leader in private aviation with the largest and most diverse private jet fleet in the world. NetJets began in 1964 as the first aircraft charter and management company in the world. In 1986, NetJets pioneered the concept of fractional aircraft ownership offering individuals and businesses all of the benefits of whole aircraft ownership and more, at a fraction of the cost. Today, NetJets offers a full range of private aviation solutions through its programs in North America and Europe, including NetJets Shares™, NetJets Leases™ and the Marquis Jet Card®, which provides access to NetJets though a 25-hour jet card.

The North America program is managed and operated by NetJets' subsidiary NetJets Aviation, Inc., and the European program is managed and operated by NetJets Transportes Aereos, SA, a Portuguese/EU Air Carrier. In the United States, NetJets also offers aircraft management and on-demand charter services through its subsidiary, Executive Jet Management, Inc. Subject to obtaining relevant regulatory approvals, NetJets will also offer aircraft management and charter services in China through NetJets China Business Aviation Limited, a joint venture between NetJets and a consortium of Chinese investors. The NetJets companies offer worldwide flight operations. More information on NetJets, NetJets Europe, the Marquis Jet Card, and Executive Jet Management is available at netjets.com.

North America
Robert Stangarone - E: rstangarone[.]embraer.com.
Cell: +1 954 260 9939 / T: +1 954 359 3101 / F: +1 954 359 4755

Europe, Middle East and Africa
Hervé Tilloy - E: herve.tilloy[.]embraer.fr.
Cell: +33(0)6 08 64 35 45 / T: +33(0)1 49 38 45 30 / F: +33(0)1 49 38 44 56

China
Mirage Zhong - E: mirage.zhong[.]bjs.embraer.com.
Cell: +86 138 1191 8053 / T: +86 10 6598 9988 / F: +86 10 6598 9986

Asia Pacific
Shorbani Roy - E: shorbani.roy[.]sin.embraer.com.
Cell: +65 9794 2401 / T: +65 6305 9955 / F: +65 6734 8255.

Your First Line of Defense-Your Paint Job

Preventative Maintenance Can Save You in the Long Run
Roy Block of Elliott Aviation, Paint Shop Manager
www.elliottaviation.com


The paint job of your aircraft should be viewed just as you view scheduled maintenance, not for any aesthetic reasons but because not properly maintaining your paint job can lead to corrosion. Corrosion on an aircraft can not only lead to very expensive repairs and long downtimes, it can create major safety risks by compromising the structural integrity of the aircraft if left untreated. For instance, we had a recent incident in which a customer brought in an aircraft for a simple phase inspection. The aircraft, built in 1996, had original factory paint. While it had some visible wear, a visual review of the aircraft only told part of the story. The inspection revealed that the aircraft had major corrosion to structural components that put the aircraft at a major safety risk if left untreated. If the paint job on the aircraft had been replaced at regular intervals, the cost of paint jobs would have been about half the cost of the structural repairs.

A typical paint job can protect an aircraft for about six years for jets and six to eight years for turboprops. The life of the paint job will be affected, however, by several factors like airframe time, hangar conditions, and elements like rain, ice, sand, and salty air. You should also consider factors like rapid changes in temperature and pressure. For instance, if you are taking off in Phoenix and the temperature on the ground is 110, within minutes of takeoff, your aircraft will experience temperatures well below zero and a size difference due to lower barometric pressure in the atmosphere. All of these stresses on the exterior of your aircraft contribute to the life of the paint job.

When getting your aircraft repainted, a proper prep process will ensure maximum adhesion. This all starts with a clean removal of the prior paint job. Removal of the old paint is always a dirty job but it is essential to having a clean surface to allow safe prep of the skin of the aircraft. On aluminum aircraft, aircraft should receive a chemical strip process to reduce the amount of sanding needed to the skin. Any remaining coating is then sanded to bare aluminum.

Once removal of the old coating is completed, Alodine, a conversion coating, is then applied which creates a tough, flexible coating with exceptional corrosion and temperature resistance. Alodine provides great corrosion protection and even protects when scratched. 2024 aluminum treated with Alodine can withstand direct salt spray for 150-600 hours before forming white corrosion while untreated 2024 can only withstand for less than 24 hours. After Alodine is applied, the aircraft is washed and checked for water breaks.

After Alodine is applied, a green Zinc Chromate primer is applied for an extra level of corrosion protection and maximum paint adhesion. Once the primer is completed, the aircraft receives a base coat, is then laid out for stripes and accent colors are added.

Primer and paint should be applied in a climate controlled, downdraft paint facility. This reduces overspray and dirt and allows for maximum paint adhesion for the highest level of protection you can have for your aircraft. You can prolong maximum life out of your aircraft paint job by taking a few key precautions, such as regularly hangaring your aircraft, keeping the exterior clean and free of any debris and touching up any paint imperfections you may encounter as soon as you notice them. Do not to let any signs of wear and tear go unnoticed as it could save you a lot of time and money in the long run. If your aircraft’s paint job is coming up on the 6 year mark, have your paint job inspected by a trusted paint facility.

Roy Block has 19 years of aircraft painting experience, starting with his father’s aircraft painting business in East Central Iowa where he worked for 10 years painting light aircraft. Roy will soon be celebrating his 9th year with Elliott Aviation where he began as a second-shift Paint Technician advancing to Team-Leader, Supervisor and now Paint Shop Manager.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

 

Citation X Captain Pilots For World-Renowned Fractional Operator

   On warm and sunny days here in Louisville, Kentucky, I have made a habit of going out to the field that lies due south of my father’s house. There in the field I feel at home; I lie down in the cool, soft grass, look up at the endless sky as I ponder my life. High above this planet where the vapor turns to gas, there is no such thing as hurt, there is no such thing as pain; there is no war and there is no evil. Up there, life is peaceful, beautiful and every shade of blue. It fascinates me to imagine how simple life could be; all we have to do is take the time to stop and see the world around us. Life has a funny way of twisting and turning in every direction except the one we are expecting; and once we lose our way, we are apt to miss out on something really great. There are always going to be reasons why we never did those things we wanted most, but that is so silly. Live your life, do everything you ever dreamed of doing and don’t look back.

   This time, my story is about a boy who knew from a very young age that he wanted to be a pilot. So much so that he would lie awake at night, letting his imagination carry him away as he slipped into fantasies of flight. The year was 1970, young Jeffrey Newcomb was twelve years of age and constantly on the lookout for anything aviation. Jeff would spend days with his nose in a flying magazine, any that he could find. Specifically, Jeff he recalls reading Air Progress, Private Pilot, Plane and Pilot and Flying. Jeff wasn’t quite sure why this dream had found him, be it spiritual or for the simplicity of freedom; but he supposed it didn’t matter anyway. What mattered was that he knew he was going to be a pilot someday. Unfortunately, bad news was lurking in the shadows for your young Jeff. One night over a family dinner, Jeffrey attempted to first express his passion for aviation to his parents. Needless to say, times were different then and aviation was less than safe according to Jeff’s mother and father. Jeff’s father had served time in the NAVY and although he had not piloted himself, he had a horrible fear of flight and refused to see his son put himself in such “danger.” On top of that, it has been said that the 70s and early 80s were NOT the best time to become a career pilot simply due to the large number of military pilots coming out of the Vietnam war. Ultimately, Jeff’s father had different ideas for his son and promptly began pushing him towards a career in business, sales and marketing.

   When the time came for Jeff to go away for college, he headed off to the University of New Hampshire in order to complete his undergrad degree. In 1979 Jeff graduated from UNH with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration as his father had suggested. Jeff continued forward with in his education and almost immediately ventured off to Antioch New England Graduate School located in Keene, New Hampshire, where he received his master’s degree in counseling Psychology. Still unsure as to what profession he may finally end up pursuing, Jeff went off to George Mason University located in Fairfax, Virginia where he completed a second master’s degree in Clinical Psychology.

   In 1987, Jeff went to work part time with an old country medical doctor out of a private office. For the next five years the medical doctor and Jeff worked together helping each other, help others. Once a week, Jeff would take over this medical office in order to meet with his clients for their routine therapy sessions. Jeffery enjoyed helping people in any way that he could, yet, he began to notice a pattern in his work. Although Jeff met with many different types of patients over the years, he found that he primarily spoke with married couples in couple’s type therapy. Some rekindled their love while others ended harshly in divorce and misfortune. Although these relationships and occurrences all took vital importance in Jeff’s life, none affected him quite as much as the divorce of his own parents. In 1992 Jeff’s parents filed for a divorce and just like that Jeff’s life had changed. He no longer desired a career in psychology; Jeff was ready to do just exactly what his parents had always advised him not to do. Needless to say, in January of 1993, when Jeff was thirty-five years old he began taking flight lessons. Again, people in Jeff’s life discouraged him from aviation. They told him that he was too old, the lessons would cost too much money, he would never be able to make a career out of flying without military background, etc.

Jeff wasn’t listening.

   Luckily, Jeffrey had friends in the business. His old pal Lee and colleague Greg owned and ran a small FBO named Sky Bright out of Laconia, New Hampshire. There in Laconia, Jeffrey Newcomb learned to fly despite every negative thing anyone had ever told him. It took Jeff roughly one year to complete all necessary pilot training and in 1993, he became certified to instruct and began teaching student pilots at Sky Bright. At this point in Jeffrey’s career he needed to begin building his time in multi-engine aircraft so that he could begin a new job as a charter pilot and work his way up in business. Some twenty thousand dollars later, Jeff was successfully checked out to fly the Beechcraft Baron as well as the Cessna 310 and in no time at all he was began his new career as a charter pilot flying the Baron for Sky Bright.

   In the spring of 1995, Jeff jumped on board a new flying opportunity and was off to Orlando, Florida in order to pursue an offer to fly for Comair Airlines. At Comair, Jeffrey flew as first officer for several years before he was transitioned north to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he became the captain on the Brasilia for one year. During these five years Jeff also flew the Canadair Regional Jet as well as the Metroliner. Newcomb absolutely loved this job and intended to stay…until a massive strike broke out in 2001. Just in the nick of time one of the largest international, fractional operator/time shares opened their door in search of a captain to fly their Cessna Citation X aircraft. Jeffrey Newcomb calls it “a spiritual thing” that he was lucky enough to be granted with such an incredible opportunity. In no time at all the cards played out and he was dealt a fantastic hand. Suddenly Jeffrey was on board and working his dream career with only 4500 hours of flight time.

   Today, twelve years later, Jeffrey has 4600+ hours in the Citation X aircraft, he has maintained his career with the same time share company and he says he could not be more thrilled! Jeffery will tell anyone he meets that he absolutely loves serving people; he enjoys making things happen and in turn, seeing people smile. “Airline flying was easy compared to private! However, flying corporate and fractional are so much more rewarding because you (as their pilot)get the opportunity to actually work one on one with your guests” Jeffrey states. “The greatest satisfaction is providing service directly to the people that you fly.” Also, Jeff thoroughly enjoys the variety of his trips. During an average week, Jeff typically flies to several different places. On any given day he may be flying a family to fabulous Bermuda for vacation, then turn around and spend the night in Aspen, Colorado that very same evening. With his current company, Jeff has also become very accustom to transcontinental flights where he may begin a trip in Teterboro, New Jersey, have dinner off the coast of southern California and be prepared for takeoff to Lakeland, Florida first thing the very next morning!

   The moral of this story is to not ever give up trying, on the things you want most out of life. Thirteen year old Jeffrey Newcomb sat at his family’s dinner table and thought very sincerely that all was lost. He thought his dreams of one day becoming a pilot were no more and he certainly would be sentenced to live a life on the ground. I’m here today folks, to tell you the good news of Jeff’s very real success story. On this very day, Jeff is a pilot working for a very successful company and living a very successful life. Against all odds, Jeffrey Newcomb did it. Currently, Jeff is living back home in small town New Hampshire with his adoring wife, Adriana and any spare time that he finds, he designates to students pilots. Jeff is excited to be back and instructing at Sky Bight, where he taught twenty years ago. Flying still excites Jeff to the nth degree. He feels excited to push the starter button on the engine of his Citation X and he still gets butterflies as he prepares for takeoff. Jeff enjoys watching the sun rise above the clouds and he states that he has the best office in the whole world; seeing the stars at night and ground below thrills him now more than ever and he wouldn’t trade for a thing.

Jim and Matt

Note from the Author: Thank you so much for taking the time to stop by and read my article! I cannot even begin to describe how much I’ve learned in just a few short months since I started with this series. You are all such inspiring aviators and pilots, so thanks for reaching out to me with your comments and emails. I hope you enjoyed this article, and keep up the awesome thoughts, comments and on-blog conversations! -As always, please feel free to message me directly with your thoughts at - [email protected]. I’d love to hear from you!

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