All posts tagged 'aviation' - Page 9

Aviation is Synonymous with Innovation

The entire world of aviation was born from human innovation. We saw birds take flight and said to ourselves, “Why couldn’t we do that?” Since the beginning of time we have been looking for ways to be better, to move to the future, and to make tomorrow brighter and easier for mankind.

By now most people have heard of Nextgen, the nation-wide plans to move the aviation industry into the future. The Federal Aviation Association and Department of Transportation are pushing for this update to the National Aerospace System that will bring us into a safer and more efficient airspace environment.

The Nextgen mission is very fascinating, but I am interested in the projects that are put together by smaller companies. The innovators of tomorrow are truly the dreamers of today. They come up with amazing ideas, and decide to believe in their ideas with all of their might. Much like Steve Jobs starting the Apple empire in his garage in California, I believe that the future of aviation will be paved with innovations from individuals and small businesses.

I have recently come across a few companies that are doing just that. I am very interested to see where these innovators take their ideas in the future, and I can’t wait to see new realms of progress within the world of aviation.

"MakerPlane is an open source aviation organization which will enable people to build and fly their own safe, high quality, reasonable cost plane using advanced personal manufacturing equipment such as CNC mills and 3D printers.” Imagine being able to design your own aircraft and print the necessary pieces out. The technology this project is creating opens so many doors for the future of homebuilt aircraft.

Malloy Aeronautics has created a prototype for a stable and pretty great looking Hoverbike. They are currently still in the testing phase, but have plans for mass production of the hovercraft if they can secure enough funding for the project. I certainly can see a future where having a personal hovercraft is commonplace.

Terrafugia have created the flying car of tomorrow. Many have already heard of this project, but having an aircraft that is capable of converting into a car is an amazing feat.

I hope that showing you a few of these innovators inspires you to achieve more and create a better future for aviation. Here’s to the next great ideas!

Part 61 and Part 141 Flight Schools – What's The Difference? Should I Care?

Sometimes picking the right flight school can be as confusing as your first time seeing a sectional chart.

Every student pilot knows that where you train is as important as how you train. When I first began searching for a flight school, I quickly learned that the style of training offered by one flight school could be wildly different from another. There can be a huge contrast between having an independent CFI and being part of a flight school with rigid schedules and precise syllabi. I was constantly urged to learn about the instructing styles of multiple schools and instructors before choosing one.

For a number of months I attended a distinguished flight school in Louisville. They were great at training, and despite the fact that I was 12 at the time, they treated me like any other student. I remember attending a group ground school session where I was the youngest student by at least 40 years. I was this young girl trying very hard to fit in with the adults, and to learn advanced concepts of aviation at the same pace they were. In reality I had just started learning algebra a few weeks before.

The flight school was top notch and I gained a great deal of experience there but my training was quickly halted as money and time became an issue. After more searching and talking with other pilots, I was able to find The Institute for Aerospace Education, a high school program that was based at a school less than 30 minutes from my house. A couple years passed from when I had been instructed in Louisville, so I began this program with a new motivation and passion.

At the time I joined the program, it was a Part 61. This week, my great little flight school became certified as Part 141. This is a pretty big deal for a high school program, and further assured me that I have made the right decision for my future in attending this school. For those of you who do not know the difference of Part 61 and Part 141, here is a quick rundown. The number refers to which part of the federal regulations it is authorized under to train pilots.

Part 61

Schools certified under Part 61 are the most common type of flight school. All FAA-approved flight instructors, freelance or otherwise, may train students under Part 61. Typically Part 61 schools have a more relaxed schedule, working with the student’s preferences and availability. They have less accountability and paperwork requirements for the FAA than their Part 141 counterparts. These tend to be better for students who just want their first couple ratings or do not plan to pursue aviation as a career.

Part 141

In order to be a certified Part 141 flight school, the owner must go through a process that involves hours of paperwork and close examination of the actual teaching procedures at the school. All curriculum, training, and operations must be in accordance with the regulations outlined in Part 141 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. There are benefits to going through such a long process to certify the school, as students are able to get their licenses and ratings in fewer hours. This does not make a huge difference for Private Pilots, as they only have 5 hours taken off the standard of 40. However, once you reach the Commercial rating you can get a certification at 60 hours less than any Part 61 peers.

Which is better?

In reality, that depends entirely on you. If you personally learn better with a rigid schedule and lesson plan, then seek out a 141 certified flight school. If you tend to learn better in a more relaxed, casual environment, 61 would be better suited for you. One disadvantage of a Part 141 school is that many students can reach the point of feeling overwhelmed with the fast pace. I have always felt that a Part 61 would be better for a pilot who has never been exposed to aviation before their training, so that they can ease into the material.

I hope this has helped you grasp a better understanding of the different types of flight schools. Good luck on your training, whether it be Part 61 or 141!

Report From the 25th Annual International Women in Aviation Conference

photo by Andrew Zaback—record attendance to hear Eileen Collins speak at the Luncheon on Friday, March 7 at the 25th Annual International Women in Aviation Conference

On the weekend of March 6th 2014, over 4,500 people attended the 25th annual Women in Aviation International conference held at Walt Disney World in Florida. I was fortunate enough to find myself able to attend for my first time this year. Although I was not sure what to expect, I left the conference with unforgettable memories and a true love for Women in Aviation International.

I was determined to get out of my comfort zone and make the most of this experience, so on my first day I made a beeline for the volunteer booth to sign up to help in whichever area they needed me. I was told by the volunteer coordinator that they had over 300 volunteers signed up for the conference. She said that the success of the conference really had so much to do with volunteers, who help with every aspect from registration to article writing for the Daily newsletter. I shared a resort room with fellow aviation writer Sarina Houston, so I was nudged towards volunteering in the press room and had some great learning experiences with the women working there.

On the first day, after attending a New Member breakfast and meeting tons of great people, I was sent to the exhibitor hall for my first volunteer assignment. In celebration of the 25th anniversary, a large time capsule was filled during the conference and will be reopened in 25 years. I was asked to talk to each of the 133 exhibitors individually and pick up their time capsule items. Many were unsure as to what they should put in the capsule, but I assured them that a pamphlet or business card would work. Simply a way to say "I was here." The capsule will be opened at the 2039 conference.

It was invigorating to hear some true aviation legends speak at the conference. On Thursday night attendees were treated to an inspiring speech by SR-71 Blackbird pilot Brian Shul. After flying 212 combat missions as a USAF fighter pilot, Shul was shot down and so badly burned that he was given a very slim chance of survival, and next to no chance at a normal life. After spending 2 months in intensive care and an additional several months in physical therapy, he made a full recovery and was able to return to flying. He presented a stunning collection of rare photos he took after his recovery, during his time as a Blackbird pilot.

Attendees were invited to a special luncheon on Friday featuring a speech by Eileen Collins. Collins is a retired NASA astronaut and has the distinction of being the first female pilot and first female commander of a Space Shuttle. It was unreal to hear her causally talk about her training, and describe in detail what it is like to feel a space shuttle takeoff. She chuckled and told about when she looked out the window and it hit her that "wow, the earth IS round!"

Of the thousands in attendance, a large percentage had come for the job opportunities. Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Delta, JetBlue, Southwest, and United Airlines were all present at the conference, taking resumes and conducting short interviews with applicants. Sharply dressed pilots flocked to their booths and it was fun talking to some of the energetic young job searchers.

I’m in a great spot for attending this conference, because I am graduating high school and beginning the rest of my flight training in a few short months. I tried to make a point of visiting every flight university and hearing about what makes them special, and how they are conducting their training of the next generation of pilots. I lingered at the Bristow Academy and Whirly-Girls booths, envisioning my life as a helicopter pilot. There are so many scholarships and opportunities available for an education in aviation, it is simply a matter of knowing where to look.

After passing by and lusting over an Abingdon watch a few times, I went to some of the education sessions. I learned tips and tricks for publishing my own book, and listened to a panel of female airline pilots. There were dozens of other educational sessions happening, and I only wish there were more of me so I could have attended more of them!

Seeing thousands of people who are passionate about aviation and are enjoying their careers in the field was extremely inspiring. I highly encourage anyone who is serious about aviation to look into attending the next Women in Aviation International conference. I can’t wait to attend next year’s conference myself and reunite with some of the great girls I met last weekend.

When was the last time you went "Downtown"?

How do you know what's going on downtown?

Save for a helicopter, business aviation happens exclusively at the airport, correct? Wrong. Aviation happens at the airport, business happens everywhere. To be effective, a business aviation manager needs to be wherever the company business is conducted. Having the ear of the CEO is great.  But, the average length of tenure of a Fortune 500 CEO is 4.6 years. What happens when there is a new CEO?

No Plane No Gain has great resources and user stories about the value of business aviation.  We need that support, but it is mostly advocacy for business aviation directed to people like the press or local community. But what about within your own company? How is the business aircraft viewed? As an essential business tool or as a royal barge?

A recent client was facing a second round of layoffs. Their sales were down. They operated a business aircraft to access many of their distant operating locations. None of those locations could be easily reached by commercial air. A review of their use of the aircraft revealed that this aircraft was effectively and efficiently being used to manage their operations. But they were acutely aware that if their employees were facing a layoff and saw the senior leadership climbing aboard the corporate jet, that could have a negative impression. The board was concerned and fortunately, I provided them with the report supporting continued use of the business aircraft as the most efficient means of transporting the senior leadership. But still remaining was the optics.

Business aviation needs to be marketed and sold within the companies it serves. One way this can be done is for the aviation manager to be directly involved downtown. That's where the business is. The more successful business aviation departments have that access to the senior leadership through regular contact at the corporate locations. 

In spending time at the corporate headquarters, the aviation manager can be seen as a team member, part of the company. They also have the opportunity to soft-sell the value of the business aircraft to senior leadership, and even their staffers and support employees. The aviation manager can be proactive in anticipating the future air travel needs, and also have more of an impact into the policies and use of the business aircraft. 

I cannot say how many times I have heard this from the department head or Senior VP who has the flight department as part of their responsibilities: "I don't use the aircraft myself, and I really don't understand it. But, the CEO is happy."  Does any aviation manager want their immediate boss not knowing what value they add to the corporation?  CEO's will come and go. Board of Directors get new members with new ideas and opinions. Rather than aviation being politically connected to one CEO, it is far better in the long run to be connected to the corporation's mission and goals.

If you are not there now, start with a review of your corporation's vision and mission statement. Then develop ones for aviation that directly tie into the corporate goals. Run them by your senior leadership and users for inputs. Get this in writing and, along with the rules for use of the aircraft, have it for the CEO or other senior leader signature. Spend time downtown. It may not seem like much at first, but it can pay off for the aviation department, and corporation, in the long run.

 

Why go the Extra Mile?

Sometimes it pays!

Jim Odenwaldt
Elliott Aviation Aircraft Sales Manager

www.elliottaviation.com

In our previous articles we talked about the technical side of our deals; now it is time for a discussion about the power of relationships. Dealer/Brokers thrive on repeat business from our core customer base. We all need new customers to keep our database alive but we must nurture relations with customers who have already used our services. As our client’s needs change, we need to be willing to adjust, stay intelligent and supportive.

I spent my first 16 years in the Aircraft Sales business with a full-service dealership. Our sales team represented a full line of new piston through turboprop products and enjoyed a large protected territory. We had the backing of an MRO division that grew to several OEM Authorized Service Centers. We were stocking dealer and did our own demos, deliveries and often customer training . This offering was ideal for many owners as they had local and complete support as they moved up the product line.

In the late 90’s I met an owner of a cabin-class single who was ready to move up and purchased a new twin turboprop. He would base with us and be a perfect customer… buying airplanes, hangar, fuel and maintenance. My company was happy with the deal and also happy to tell me that I would personally be doing the 200 hrs of transition training that the insurance company had decided to require. It was immediately obvious he was excellent pilot, fun to fly with and the mission was complete in four months.

The next two years went smoothly with his ownership experience and he was ready for the next logical transition to a light jet. He was a new airplane buyer and the OEM we were representing did not have a single pilot jet to offer. I painfully sat on the sideline while he bought a new airplane from the competition. We still had a fuel customer but had lost the sales and MRO business.

Interestingly, it became evident that the new jet service center being 200 miles away was very inconvenient, especially compared to the on-field service that he had become accustomed to with our product. My company was supportive of my idea to provide shuttle service to and from the competition’s facility, as needed. Yes, it was usually a piston airplane but it was a ride and he was very appreciative. This offer of support proved key, since after two years, our OEM had a single-pilot jet to offer and the customer was ready for an upgrade. We participated in the new delivery, got our local facility MRO Factory Authorization for the new jet and sold the trade!

The decision to think outside the box and offer the extra support with this client proved to be very worthwhile. He has provided countless referrals and has personally owned eight airplanes, bought two for his company and had us involved in 13 transactions. Without the decision to offer the support when he went with the completion it would have most likely ended with just the one sale. We have remained loyal to each other and that’s a win-win.

Jim Odenwaldt has extensive flying and technical experience with all Beechcraft products and sales expertise with all models of Hawker/Beech, Citation and Gulfstream. After graduating from Embry-Riddle in 1989, Jim worked as a CFI and maintenance technician. While with American Beechcraft Company, he was responsible for aircraft sales in the mid-Atlantic region. In addition to his ATP, Jim is an A&P and type rated in the Beechcraft Premier.

Elliott Aviation is a second-generation, family-owned business aviation company offering a complete menu of high quality products and services including aircraft sales, avionics service & installations, aircraft maintenance, accessory repair & overhaul, paint and interior, charter and aircraft management. Serving the business aviation industry nationally and internationally, they have facilities in Moline, IL, Des Moines, IA, and Minneapolis, MN. The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), National Air Transportation Association (NATA), and National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA).

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