All posts tagged 'aviation news' - Page 14

Euro-volcano update


 


                                                                          Photograph courtesy Árni Sæberg, Icelandic Coast Guard


The Eurocontrol press office reports that flights were down by about 500 today (less than 2 percent), compared to 1,500 off on Sunday (roughly 7 percent). Tomorrow's volume could be reduced another 500 flights.

An area of ash in the North Atlantic continues to affect flight paths of jets into North America, making trips longer and costlier.

Read more via AviationNews.Us here.

And via the Australian Broadcasting Corporation here.

Morning Rundown: This week starts off where last week ended

As we start the second full week in May, the biggest stories in aviation carry over from the first week.

Optimism is abundant among the industry, at least when judging by tradeshow turnout. EBAA President Brian Humphries said this year’s EBACE was the highest attended in history, with more people coming through the turnstiles in the first day of the 2010 convention than during the entire 2009 show.

Businesses and organizations filled more than 430 booths, alongside more than 60 aircraft featured in static displays.

Staying with Europe this morning where the skies are somewhat the same, bothersome. Rehashing the ash – volcanic ash – Monday again saw airport closures in Spain and elsewhere. Heathrow Airport reported passenger traffic down nearly 21 percent in April compared to the prior year, largely due to the eruption. Cargo traffic at the hub, however, was up 7.8 percent last month in metric tonnage.

In domestic airport news, Million Air celebrated the ‘soft opening’ of its facility at San Bernardino International Airport (SBD). An official grand opening will take place this summer.

From the desk of unfortunate irony this morning: As the media reports on the environmental and ecological damage suffered in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of a massive BP oilrig spill, the footprint of journalists in the area may be causing its own negative repercussions on regional wildlife.

Audubon Magazine reports that press helicopters have been flying illegally over Breton National Wildlife Refuge, a coastal bird sanctuary, causing disturbances. As oil has washed ashore, the facility has closed, creating a rough situation for those who care for the birds and other species.  

From the Audubon blog post linked above:

“We’ve done all this work to try and protect those islands with booms,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokesperson Chuck Underwood. “But in the end, folks flying in low and landing just to get their photographs has been disturbing the birds. In some cases, there has even been nest abandonment.”    

Morning Rundown: Casual Friday

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With EBACE wrapped up, it looks like a somewhat slow Friday morning in the world of aviation. Attention spans dwindle. Imaginations run to the big cookout or trip to lake this weekend. Before we get to all that, though, we shall throw some news and links your way. 

EBACE kept a positive note throughout, in what was the highest attended since 2007 and the second highest in the event's history. Michael A. Taverna of Aviation Week wraps up coverage by again focusing on business being on an uptick in the first quarter of 2010.

JSSI announced it has enrolled its 1,000th engine on its coverage plan.

England's Prince Henry learned today that he will train to fly Apache helicopters for the British Army. He hopes to return to action in Afghanistan.

For those of you who want more than news on this casual Friday, it is recommended to check out WINGsReality, an Internet-based reality-style series where pilots practice in emergency scenarios, then get judged by a panel. Check out the show, hosted at AtlantaWebFoundry.com, where we also found the video embedded above.

Finally, a good weekend to all. We wish a Happy Mother's Day to the moms in your families. In celebration, here is a link from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum that highlights the history of women in aviation.

 

Tense exchange between ATC and pilot at JFK

A recording posted on LiveATC.net Wednesday evening dictates an American Airlines Boeing 767 pilot telling the tower at JFK airport that he will declare an emergency if he cannot land on a particular runway.

From a New York Post article:

Morning Rundown: more EBACE, more volcano, Gulfstream news and new NOTAM system

The aviation world's spotlight continued to shine on Europe Wednesday, despite the layers of ash in the upper atmosphere.

David Learmount of Flight Global echoed the recurring theme reported most everywhere from EBACE this week -- that recovery in the industry will come at a slow pace. It focuses on comments from Richard Aboulafia, chief analyst of the Teal Group, and says return to robust activity in aircraft sales may not arrive in full until 2012. 

Jeremy Cox of Jetbrokers, Inc., reports directly from EBACE on his blog. He says a lobby bar during the first night was packed with people eager to make deals.

Cox also mentions that the Gulfstream G650 gained the title of world's fastest business jet. Flying at Mach 0.925 on Sunday, it strips the ranking from Cessna's Citation X.

Gulfstream chief Joe Lombardo spoke at EBACE on how European growth has helped solidify the business jet market and, in what has become a secondary theme at the convention, he looked forward to growth in developing nations. A decade ago, there were only 27 Gulfstream aircraft in Asia. That number stands at more than 100 today. 

The other emerging story in Europe was the return of the volcanic ash that shut down air travel throughout the continent last month. This time, though, the effects have been more localized.

Ryanair canceled its flight between Malta and Edinburgh on Wednesday. Airports in Ireland and Scotland reopened this morning as the ash moved west.

While most of the news in aviation took place across the Atlantic, there were a couple developments of interest announced in the U.S.

The FAA announced a digital NOTAM system going live in Atlantic City. The link in the prior sentence includes details on the system. Other airports to join the program in the next round are Washington Dulles, Reagan National, Baltimore-Washington International, Richmond, Norfolk, Denver, Chicago O’Hare and Midway, Memphis, Fairbanks, Alaska and Ft. Wayne, Ind.

In a final note, NASA tested an astronaut escape rocket for its Orion spacecraft in New Mexico this morning. It was a success that "went like clockwork," even as the future-of-space-travel program itself is being restructured. 

 

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