All posts tagged 'international flight'

Open House Held for Newly Built Landmark Aviation LFPB Facility

A first look at Landmark LFPB’s new facility, which includes a VIP lounge, bistro, pilot lounge, passenger lobby, flight planning center, prayer room, and two conference rooms. Photos courtesy Landmark Aviation.

(Houston, TX – July 2, 2014) An open house was held on June 26 to highlight the newly constructed 8,500 square-foot Landmark Aviation Aéroport de Paris le Bourget (LFPB) facility. Built on the existing property, the new facility is adjacent to Landmark’s hangar and is located at Avenue de l’Europe 93350 Le Bourget.

"We are very pleased to announce the completion of our new, state-of-the-art facility at Aéroport de Paris le Bourget," Landmark Aviation President and CEO Dan Bucaro stated. "We appreciate the support provided by the airport authority throughout this process, and look forward to not only better serving our existing customers, but to increasing business at Le Bourget."

The new terminal includes a VIP lounge, bistro, pilot lounge, passenger lobby, flight planning center, prayer room, and two conference rooms. The construction project has taken approximately one year. In addition to the terminal building, Landmark will add covered parking to the facility.

"Our new facility is much more spacious and offers additional amenities that will allow us to provide a better experience for our customers," Landmark Aviation’s LFPB General Manager Denis Bourgois said.

About Landmark Aviation
Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Landmark Aviation operates a network of fixed base operations located throughout the U.S., Canada and Western Europe. The Company offers a wide range of services, including FBO, MRO, aircraft management & charter. Landmark is a portfolio company of the Carlyle Group. For more information, visit www.landmarkaviation.com.

Exhibitor record at leading exhibition for the airport industry

inter airport Europe 2013 will open its doors from October 8 – 11, 2013 at the Munich Trade Fair Centre in Germany. For this year’s show, exhibition organizers, Mack Brooks Exhibitions, announce a record number of exhibitors and a record floor space. More than 630 exhibitors from 37 countries will present their innovations at the 19th International Exhibition for Airport Equipment, Technology, Design & Services. The exhibition range covers all areas of airport planning, design and operation. Solutions for aircraft, passenger and cargo handling, security, airport IT, architectural components as well as Ground Support Equipment will be on display.

"A 10% increase in floor space and 4% more exhibitors compared with the previous exhibition reflect the general recovery of the airport industry. While passenger numbers in growth regions such as Asia have continuously increased over the past two years, passenger figures in Europe have remained static for quite a long time. Now the forecasts predict that the economic situation for the European airport industry will pick up again. Furthermore, the worldwide cargo market is currently also showing first signs of recovery", says Nicola Hamann, Show Director inter airport Europe, on behalf of the organizers, Mack Brooks Exhibitions.

Innovations for all areas of the airport

inter airport Europe, the leading exhibition for the international airport industry, is considered an important barometer for the economic situation of the industry branch as well as for technical innovations. Once again, the exhibitors will showcase new and enhanced products and services to improve the handling processes at airports and make airports more secure, more efficient and more environmental-friendly. From energy-efficient baggage handling solutions to high-speed explosives detection systems and environment-friendly de-icing equipment, there will be a wide range of innovations on display. Visitors can look forward to a large number of live demonstrations and expert exchange about the advantages of new and enhanced products.

Four exhibiting companies will receive the inter airport Europe Innovation Award for their technical advancements. During the official Opening and Awards ceremony on Tuesday, 8 October 2013, at 11 a.m., in the entrance area of the exhibition, prizes will be awarded in the four exhibition categories interRAMP (ground support equipment), interTERMINAL (technical terminal installations and services), interDATA (specialized hard and software) and interDESIGN (architecture and furnishings). Award winners have been selected by an international panel of industry experts.

Visitor Information

The exhibition website features extensive information about the exhibition and its exhibitors. The online show planner is a useful tool for visitors to plan their visit to the show. The online show preview includes profiles and product descriptions of hundreds of exhibiting companies. A personalized show preview can be created by choosing the relevant exhibition categories.

Smartphone users are able to access the official app for inter airport Europe 2013 from www.iae2go.com. The up-to-date exhibitor list, the conference program and the Show Daily can be accessed here as well.

Travel, opening hours, entrance tickets

inter airport Europe 2013 will take place at the Munich Trade Fair Centre, occupying halls B5 and B6, directly linked with the spacious outdoor area for the presentation of large-scale exhibits such as de-icers, push-back tractors, snow sweepers and fire fighting vehicles. Entrance to the show will be entrance Ost (East) of Munich Trade Fair Centre.

The venue is easily accessible by air, road and public transport. Shuttle buses will be running from Munich International Airport at regular short intervals throughout the day.

inter airport Europe 2013 will be open from Tuesday, 8 October 2013, to Thursday, 10 October 2013, from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and on Friday, 11 October 2013, from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Entrance tickets are available at a favorable price via the online ticket shop on inter airport Europe website. Price for a day ticket via the online ticket shop is € 37; for a season ticket € 57; the on-site price of a day ticket is € 47; for a season ticket € 67.

Euro-volcano update


 


                                                                          Photograph courtesy Árni Sæberg, Icelandic Coast Guard


The Eurocontrol press office reports that flights were down by about 500 today (less than 2 percent), compared to 1,500 off on Sunday (roughly 7 percent). Tomorrow's volume could be reduced another 500 flights.

An area of ash in the North Atlantic continues to affect flight paths of jets into North America, making trips longer and costlier.

Read more via AviationNews.Us here.

And via the Australian Broadcasting Corporation here.

Why you should always park your Aircraft when Volcanic Ash is in your Path

On April 14th, 2010, both the U.K.’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and its National Air Traffic Services (NATS) and Luftfartstilsynet (Norway’s CAA) made what appears to many as having been a brave but rash decision to close all of its nations airspace (initially Norway closed only its most northern airspace) to all traffic as a result of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano: Eyjafjallokul located in the South-western portion of this small Island Nation.

There appears to be a rising tide of disgruntlement forming amongst the European air-travelling public as well as the employees of the many companies that service this segment, against the sweeping decisions made by both of the CAAs, NATS, Eurocontrol and EASA that a “no-fly” ban to be placed over much of Europe. This ban lasted more than seven days, thus throwing the travel plans of millions into utter chaos, and according to Giovanni Bisignani, the director general and chief executive of IATA “For an industry (Airlines) that lost $9.4bn last year and was forecast to lose a further $2.8bn in 2010, this crisis (the ban) was devastating..."

 

I personally must contest this negative discourse that is gathering momentum over the decision that was made, because when the facts of the very real dangers that exist within the plume of a volcanic ash cloud are systematically reviewed, it becomes obvious that the right decision was made.

In appendix 2 of the FAAs Airmen Information Manual, you will find a specific form titled: Volcanic Activity Report (VAR) which must be completed and sent to the Global Volcanism Program headquarters at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. The AIM further states in section:

7-1-27. PIREPs Relating to Volcanic Ash Activity

a. Volcanic eruptions which send ash into the upper atmosphere occur somewhere around the world several times each year. Flying into a volcanic ash cloud can be extremely dangerous. At least two B747s have lost all power in all four engines after such an encounter. Regardless of the type aircraft, some damage is almost certain to ensue after an encounter with a volcanic ash cloud.

b. While some volcanoes in the U.S. are monitored, many in remote areas are not. These unmonitored volcanoes may erupt without prior warning to the aviation community. A pilot observing a volcanic eruption who has not had previous notification of it may be the only witness to the eruption. Pilots are strongly encouraged to transmit a PIREP regarding volcanic eruptions and any observed volcanic ash clouds.

c. Pilots should submit PIREPs regarding volcanic activity using the Volcanic Activity Reporting (VAR) form as illustrated in Appendix 2. If a VAR form is not immediately available, relay enough information to identify the position and type of volcanic activity.

d. Pilots should verbally transmit the data required in items 1 through 8 of the VAR as soon as possible. The data required in items 9 through 16 of the VAR should be relayed after landing if possible.

The two Boeing 747 incidents cited in the AIM are the four-engine flame-outs that occurred to, first on the night of June 24th, 1982 where British Airways flight number 9 dropped from FL370 down to about 10,000 feet M.S.L. after flying through the volcanic plume from Mount Galunggung in West Java, Indonesia; second on December 15th, 1989 where KLM flight number 867, on its way from FL250 to FL390 fell to an altitude below 11,000 feet after flying through the black plume that was being spewed from the erupting Mount Redoubt near Anchorage, Alaska, here in the U.S.A. Fortunately in both cases, some, if not all of the effected engines were restarted, and both aircraft were able to make emergency landings without injury, at a suitable diversionary airport.

Even though there was no loss of life involved in both of these incidents, considerable damage occurred to both aircraft as a result of their unfortunate forays into volcanic ash clouds. 

Most recently in Europe ash damage has been found in the engines of a World Airways MD-11, a Thomas Cook B757, several of the RAF Typhoon Euro-fighters and a Finnish F-18 Hornet. As engine inspections are stepped-up because normal air operations are returning to the skies of Europe, I would be very surprised if more reported examples of engine damage don’t become prominent in the aviation press.

How does volcanic ash cause damage to an aircraft and its engines? Allow me to explain...

The columns of ash that spew from a volcano, normally settle in the flight levels between FL320 and FL350. If seen in daylight, these extensive clouds of debris vary in colour from light brown to jet-black. The worst aspect of them is that they do not show up on Radar.  Every year there are normally 60 volcanic eruptions around the globe. Usually 10 of these are classified as being “major.” Every eruption poses many unknown ash hazards, and normally more than 100,000,000 tons of ash is thrown into the air from any major eruption. The properties of an ash plume are both abrasive and acidic and normally consist of hard, sharp fragments of glass and rock in varying sizes and having high concentrations of Sulphur Dioxide, which when mixed with water, becomes Sulphuric Acid.

All windows, light lenses and leading edges are severely damaged by the abrasive ash encounter. Pitot/static systems become clogged and when on the ground, braking action and traction is severely affected by the ash-bed that lays on a runway or taxi-way.

The lethal danger associated with volcanic ash is how quickly it will cause a flame-out and in-flight shutdown of a gas turbine engine. All of the compressor and turbine blades are severely eroded, causing immediate loss of power. Bleed and cooling airway holes quickly become blocked and immediately start affecting the normal airflow through the engine. The fuel-air mixture rapidly becomes too rich, and the engines flame-out. Before the engines do rich-cut, the chances are extremely high that enough igneous rock debris has made it through the hot section of the engine to start reforming as a glass coating or build up on many of the interior components. It goes without saying that if the engine does restart at a lower altitude; its serviceability is shot, whereby only an expensive teardown and overhaul will render it back to a serviceable state.

As I said earlier, volcanic ash plumes will not paint on Radar, therefore at night, when all visual cues have become shrouded by darkness, the only technology that will indicate its presence is either a laser or infra-red system. Usually however, it is the olfactory senses provided by the good old fashioned human nose, which will first sense the ash plumes proximity. In virtually all cases of aircraft that have flown through ash clouds, the crews have all reported that they smelled, or even saw smoke in their cockpits.

Now back to the AIM. As you have seen in this article, the existence and tracking of a volcanic plume is extremely difficult to be achieved by most aviation meteorological organizations. These groups rely heavily upon Pilot Reports (PIREPS) and therefore it is critical to air safety that if you encounter ash conditions in-flight, that you report them immediately. If operating in a known area of volcanic activity, make certain that you have read all NOTAMS and PIREPS that are available to you. Plan a reroute around all actual and forecasted ash clouds. Do not climb into ash. Instead reverse course and descend. Remember you are now in an emergency situation. If you encounter ash on the ground upon landing, do not use reverse thrust, and expect your traction and braking action to be minimal at best. If you are in the unusual position of being cleared to take-off on a runway contaminated by volcanic ash, it is imperative that you perform a long, slow and gentle running roll take-off, to not kick-up too much ash from your passage over it.

Do you still feel that it was a bad decision that was made recently over the volcanic ash contaminated skies of Europe? Hopefully your response is not just “no”, but “hell no” instead.

Off-Shore Aircraft Registration

In the maritime world, a ship is said to be "flying a flag of convenience" if it is registered in a foreign country "for purposes of reducing operating costs or avoiding government regulations." The country of registration determines the laws under which the ship is required to operate under and also that which are to be applied in any relevant maritime legal cases that might come about.

In aviation there are a multitude of reasons why you might choose to register your aircraft off-shore under the flag of a foreign country. Some of these include:

Complete Anonymity, i.e. if you suffer from celebrity notoriety; or you are a powerful corporate leader who relies on discreet and untracked movement within the territory of your competitors; or simply for personal reasons requiring anonymity. When your aircraft has been registered off-shore your privacy protection begins. If a journalist, corporate competitor or other interested party seeks the registered owner of your aircraft; their search will end with the contact details of your registered agent or trustee, and not with you.

Sales Tax or other Tax Avoidance, i.e. generally speaking, it is fairly simple for you to avoid a multitude of forms of taxation that are normally associated with the ownership and operation of a private or business aircraft, by registering it off-shore. Neutral Nationality Registration, i.e. this issue has become very prominent since we have moved into the new age of terrorism and unrest. By registering off-shore, you can fly internationally without instant recognition as being from the U.S.A.

Most foreign registries require that the registrant be a citizen of that country. The United States is the same: A U.S. citizen by definition of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 47.2 can be an individual, or partnership where each individual is a U.S. citizen, or a corporation organized under the laws of the United States, state, territory, or possession of the United States of which the president and at least two-thirds of the board of directors are U.S. citizens and 75 percent of the voting interest is owned or controlled by U.S. citizens. A resident alien is considered to be a corporation other than classified as a U.S. citizen, lawfully organized and doing business under the laws of the United States or of any state thereof, if the aircraft is based and used primarily in the United States; or a government entity (federal, state, or local). How then do these off-shore registries allow a foreigner to register with them? This is allowed by the employment of a native 'Trustee' or 'Agent' who acts on-behalf for the foreign ownership entity, under the auspices of a formal 'Trust Agreement.' In all cases there are annual fees that are payable to the agent. The U.S.A. aircraft registration branch is the only authority that I know of, that does not charge any annual registration fees.

Internationally, the most popular off-shore countries of registration are Bermuda, the United States of America, and now the relatively new player: the Isle of Mann. The "M" Registration was first introduced in 2007 by the government of this small island tax-haven which is located in the North Sea between England and Northern Ireland; it is probably better known for its T.T. motorcycle racing history rather than for its aviation industry.

Even though the aircraft eligible for entry onto the "M" or "Manx" registration must all be Type Certificated by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the Isle of Mann has chosen to more closely mimic the Federal Aviation Regulations of the United States rather than the bureaucratic tangles and inconsistencies that are normally found within the rules established by the European Aviation Authorities. Interestingly though, no non-resident islander can register any aircraft that is non-turbine powered and below 12,500 lbs MGTOW, or in the case of Helicopters, a non-twin-turbine powered machine.

Since a convenient loophole in the Value Added Tax (VAT) Regulations was recently exorcised by the European Union from the Danish Ministry of Taxations' rolls, whereby a 'flat-tax' was charged for an aircraft run through their tax-registration system, instead of the normal 25% or so, being charged like everyone else. The Isle of Man registry has quickly taken the lead largely because of its zero tax ratings for both corporations and inheritances, and depending on an aircraft owner's tax domicile, the Manx government provides a pathway for owners to either significantly reduce or even eliminate the VAT charge on their aircraft purchase.

By the beginning of November, 2009 almost 180 business jets and turbo-props had already been enrolled onto the Manx aircraft register. I am certain that this number shall continue climbing at a high rate. How do you or your company handle the Registration of you aircraft? Please click on the link below which states "Reply to this Article", your thoughts and comments would be very much appreciated. Be funny, be inspired, but most importantly of all, please be nice.

Have you had any experience with this topic? If so, Discuss it with us by clicking "Reply"

End of content

No more pages to load