All posts tagged 'pilot' - Page 5

Bombardier Ponders Smaller Learjet 85 Derivative

Article By: Curt Epstein
www.ainonline.com
As progress continues on the construction of the first flight-test Bombardier Learjet 85, the airframer said this week that it sees a niche for a smaller follow-on model of the all-composite midsize jet. “I think there is an opportunity between the 75 and the 85,” Learjet vice president and general manager Ralph Acs told journalists this week during a media event. “Our entire notion all along has been that you can come up with a platform and then you spin that to other things.”  
Bombardier continues construction of the first flight-test Bombardier Learjet 85 and plans to have a full airframe assembled and achieve power on by year-end. (Photo: Curt Epstein)

Bombardier has invested heavily in its composites production facility in Querétaro, Mexico, which supplies 85 percent of the composite content for the new Learjet 85. The fuselage components for the first flight-test airframe, as well as most of those for the complete aircraft structural test (Cast) article, are in the process of being joined at the Bombardier Learjet plant in Wichita. The company plans to have a full airframe assembled and achieve power on by the end of the year. It expects the Learjet 85 to enter service later next year.

When pressed for a possible launch date of a smaller derivative of the Learjet 85–possibly to be dubbed the Learjet 80–Acs deferred, citing Bombardier’s already extensive product development schedule. “The point will come downstream where we can have these other conversations,” he said.

Pilot To Fly Cessna On Fuel From Melted Plastic

Article by Glenn Pew, Contributing Editor, Video Editor
Brought to you by: www.avweb.com

British pilot Jeremy Roswell hopes this November to fly 10,000 miles from Sydney to London in a diesel Cessna 182 burning petroleum fuel processed from waste plastics. The fuel has been developed by Cynar Plc, an Irish company that uses a process called pyrolysis to melt down plastic trash into a petroleum distillate. That product can be separated into various fuels, including a viable aviation fuel, according to the company, which says it has already tested its fuel in cars. Roswell's flight will require more than 1,000 gallons of the fuel to make his flight. And Cynar will require roughly five tons of plastic garbage to make Roswell's fuel. The company says its plastic waste diesel fuel is cleaner than conventional Jet A, its production process is cleaner, still, and it estimates a low cost per gallon in production. That said, it has expressed awareness of some potential limitations.

According to Cynar, its pyrolysis technique, which melts plastics in an anaerobic environment, creates no emissions, and a report published in November 2011 put the cost to produce one gallon of Cyn-Diesel at $1.50. As an aviation fuel, "It'll need testing and trials, but for a diesel engine not going beyond 8,000 feet, it should be fine," Cynar CEO Michael Murray told BusinessGreen.com. Roswell plans to cruise at 5,000 feet, flying roughly 13 hours each day. He will attempt to fit the 10,000-mile trip into a six-day adventure with stops at Darwin, Christmas Island, Sri Lanka, Jordan, and Malta. Roswell told the company his objective is to prove the viability of synthetic fuel made from plastic waste "and by doing so replace the need to use fossil fuels from conventional sources." According to Cynar, there are 26 million tons of plastics feeding U.S. landfills each year, backed by another 15 million tons headed each year to landfills in Europe. Says Murray, "I think [the fuel] can be a viable alternative if the industry adopts diesel-type engines." One plant that already exists in Ireland can process 20 tons of sorted plastics per year, producing 1.5 million gallons of fuel, according to the report titled, "Converting End of Life Plastic into Diesel The Cynar Experience" (PDF).

Split Second Weightlessness; Nobody Panic!

What is a stall? When someone refers to something as “stalling” what do you typically think of?

         A stall is something that I have always thought of as one of those “uh-oh” moments in life. This is one of those oh so special split second decision moments where you suddenly realize that you have done something silly or careless. You immediately go into panic-apology mode and begin rationalizing possible ways to go about eradicating whatever mistake you have just made.

         Somewhere in between my discovery flight and lesson 4, power-off stalls were introduced to me. These are also known as approach to landing stalls; this is due to the location where they are most prevalent and most likely to happen. Now, I am certainly no professional by any stretch of the word, but any time I’m 5,000 feet above ground level and someone tells me they want to “power off” anything, I freak out a little bit. Call me queasy, but this was something new. After several failed attempts to get out of it, I realized that this was just going to be another one of those things in life that I had to do. Upon learning of its utter magnitude throughout my private pilot training and inevitability in the end, during my check ride I decided to give in. Being the colossal fan of Google.com that I am, my first approach was to “Google” this new topic. Thanks to Dictionary.com, this is what I found:

Stall:

  • To stop running as a result of mechanical failure

  • To halt the motion or progress of; bring to a standstill. To cause a motor (or motor vehicle) to accidentally to stop running.

  • To cause (an aircraft) to go into a stall.


  • In the wild world of aviation; a stall refers to “a condition in which an aircraft or airfoil experiences an interruption of airflow resulting in loss of lift and a tendency to drop.”

    “As the wing angle of attack (AOA) increases to or beyond the critical AOA (approximately 16-20°), smooth airflow over the wing is disrupted, resulting in great increase in drag and loss of lift: a stall”


             Great, this is just exactly what my instincts as well as my stomach (which, during the actual stall was floating somewhere in my throat) had told me about this situation.” I thought. In that actual moment, I thought for sure I was going to die. Why in the world would this ever be a good idea? Better question, why in the world is this happening to me prior to completing lesson 4 of my flight training?

             Well let me tell you why. Most aircraft accidents occur either during a takeoff or during a landing. Being aware of the hazards associated with these phases of flight and knowing how to get yourself out of a bad situation can only make your flights safer. Power-off stalls simulate what would happen if ever there was an occurrence where the pilot was flying too slowly during the landing phase of the flight. The primary objective of a stall during training is to enhance safety in the student right away by helping assure inadvertent stall avoidance and/or prompt stall recovery. In order to assure stall avoidance the student pilot is responsible for understanding any and all flight situations where an unintentional stall may occur. Also, it is necessary to grasp the relationship of various factors relative to stall speed (Vs), be able to properly recognize the first indications of a stall as well as the proper recovery technique.

             Other things to be aware of as the pilot in charge include the relevant aerodynamic factors, flight situations, recovery procedures, as well as the hazards of uncoordinated stalling. Select entry altitude allowing recovery above 1,500 feet above ground level. Carefully watch your approach or landing configuration with throttle reduced or set to idle, straight glide with 30o, +10o bank while continuing to maintain attitude (this will induce a full stall.) Promptly recover by decreasing AOA, leveling wings, and adjusting power as necessary to regain normal attitude, retract flaps as well as gear and reestablish a climb. Finally, avoid a secondary stall, excessive airspeed or altitude loss, spins, or flight below 1,500 feet above ground level. As a student pilot performing a power off stall your objective is to familiarize yourself with the conditions that may produce a stall. Develop knowledge and skill in recognizing imminent and full stalls, as well as the well known habit of taking prompt preventive or corrective action. Overall, the objective of a power-off stall is to understand what could happen if controls were improperly used during a turn from the base leg to the final approach or on the final approach.

             In conclusion, I remember my very first power-off stall vividly! It was tremendously terrifying and I thought with sincere certainty that it would be the first and last of my approach to landing stalls. Clearly, my instructor handled the situation better than I had expected and was able to operate the vehicle enough to maneuver us out of that stall. Since then I have learned how to maneuver myself out of these stalls and usually am asked to perform at least one each time I fly. Not to worry, they absolutely have held onto me with full intensity and each power-off stall that I perform leaved me singed with virtually the same streak of fear. My stomach hovers and I panic for a split second in time, for fear that I may not recover. For now, I take it with a grain of salt. I bite my tongue, hold my breath and thrust the yolk forward with all I’ve got; hoping the little airplane and my instructor will have my back. One day I will be asked to perform such a task without Mr. Frames by my side; until then, well wish me luck!

    This is me and this is my story about approach to landing stalls. But I’m curious; do other pilots have similar fears upon performing their very first power-off stalls? Do older, professional pilots even remember their first power-off stall? I would like to ask my viewers, what are your thoughts and insights regarding these terrifying first few hours of flight training?

     

    Lee Bottom $100 Hamburger Tornado Relief Fundraiser Fly-In Announced

    Legendary Lee Bottom Flying Field, Damaged By Tornado, Needs YOUR Help
    Article by: www.aero-news.net
    FMI: www.leebottom.com

    Lee Bottom Flying Field, a near legendary airport favored by grass roots aviators the world over, will hold the $100 Hamburger Tornado Relief Fundraiser Fly-In on September 29th, 2012.

    On March 2nd, 2012, the Indiana airport suffered a direct hit by a Tornado -- and the results weren't pretty. When the winds died, every piece of equipment, and every building, was either damaged or destroyed. Soon thereafter, it was realized the facilities no longer existed to host their well known annual fly-in, The Wood, Fabric, & Tailwheels Fly-In.

    This gave rise to the idea of a much-needed fundraiser.

    Lee Bottom Flying Field isn't just known for its pleasant atmosphere, it also has a reputation for unique marketing. The $100 Hamburger Fundraiser is the latest example of this. "We couldn't just have a fundraiser. It had to be something different; something that people would expect from Lee Bottom; something that they could have fun with while helping us rebuild", said Rich Davidson. "Thanks to the tornado, it also had to be something we could do with minimal facilities and equipment". The $100 Hamburger Tornado Relief Fundraiser Fly-In was born.

    Playing on one of aviation's most well known themes, the fundraiser is really quite simple. Attendance is $100. Once inside, anyone attending is eligible to receive a free hamburger made by the Friends of Lee Bottom. People wishing to contribute who can't be on hand can purchase an entry ticket and the Friends of Lee Bottom will give a burger to a kid in their honor.

    When recently asked about the rebuild, Rich Davidson said, "It's about more than a rebuild. We would like make this an opportunity to build a new facility that would better serve the pilots who enjoy visiting the field."


    (Image Credit: www.leebottom.com)

    Never Run It Dry

    Keeping track of the time/speed/distance equation is only part of fuel management
    By Bill Cox
    www.planeandpilotmag.com



    It was the Christmas holiday, and I was on my way back from the Bahamas to Venice, Fla. Joe Ponte of Piper had graciously loaned me a Cherokee Six 300 in conjunction with a pilot report, and I had elected to take my mom and stepfather on a quick, four-day trek to Freeport and Nassau.

    On the trip back, we made a stop in Fort Lauderdale to clear customs, turn in our survival gear and close our international flight plan, then relaunched for the short hop diagonally across the state to Venice on the Gulf Coast.
    My parents were luxuriating in the back of the big Six as we cruised 6,500 feet above the swamp when the engine suddenly quit cold.

    The immediate silence got everyone's attention, especially mine. I was the number-one son, and mom trusted me implicitly in any airplane. I didn't want to dispel that trust by doing something stupid, though it seemed I already had.

    Of course, I had let one of the Cherokee Six's four tanks run dry, and the engine had shut down in a heartbeat, without a telltale tick of the fuel flow or any other forewarning. As calmly as I could, I turned on the fuel pump, then, feigning a casual motion, reached down and switched to a tank with some fuel in it. I turned to Mom and Bob in the back seat, summoned what I hoped would be a reassuring smile and said, "Sorry about that. It's no big problem. I just ran a tank dry. The engine will pick up in a few seconds."

    I turned back forward, expecting power to return at any moment. I waited and waited. Nothing happened. We were gliding down toward Lake Okeechobee, and I was beginning to wonder if we were about to discover firsthand that the lake was only five feet deep as I had read.

    Finally, after perhaps 20 seconds that seemed more like 20 minutes, I heard some expectant coughs from the Lycoming before it came slowly back online. We continued to Venice, and Mom's only comment after we landed was, "Does that happen often?"

    Fortunately, if you're smart enough to plan ahead, it need never happen even once. I obviously wasn't and didn't, so it did

    Fuel Management
    The AOPA Air Safety Foundation reports that fuel exhaustion or mismanagement are all-too-common causes of accidents, generally fourth behind landing accidents, takeoff incidents and maneuvering flight at low altitude. Fuel exhaustion is exactly what it sounds like—running the tanks dry. Fuel mismanagement relates to landing with fuel still on board but inaccessible because of a system problem, because the pilot didn't know he had it available or simply forgot to change tanks.

    Fuel management isn't really that tough these days, considering that totalizers keep almost perfect track of fuel burned and remaining. Even modern aircraft fuel gauges are more reliable than they used to be. In fact, managing fuel use was never that difficult to begin with, provided you knew how much you had on board, how much you were burning and when you departed. Assuming there were no leaks, the answer was a simple problem in elementary math. The difficulties arise when you don't know all three of the items above. Trouble is, many pilots are convinced they do know how much fuel is in the tanks when, in fact, they have only a vague idea.

    Let's consider fuel capacity. According to the book, I can carry 64 gallons in my Mooney…or can I? I bought my airplane in 1987 and knew it had never been wrecked, so it was reasonable to assume the tanks were not deformed and still in the original shape. Fortunately, I had my Mooney's tanks resealed a few years ago, so I had the perfect opportunity to determine true capacity. Every ounce of fuel had to be drained in order to reseal the tanks, and that meant I was starting from true empty.

    Accordingly, I pushed the airplane out to a level ramp, with no apparent list left or right. It was mid-morning, and the temperature was about 60 degrees F, pretty close to standard, so fuel density wasn't a concern. (Some long-distance flyers, in search of maximum range, have their fuel supercooled and pumped aboard at the last possible minute, then climb quickly to high altitude and burn the top off each tank before the avgas can expand and overflow.)

    When the fuel truck arrived, I asked the fueler to pump the 100LL slowly so there would be less chance of an air bubble. While he pumped, I shook the wing at the tip to help any air escape. Then, I watched carefully to make certain the level came to the exact bottom of the filler neck.

    When the fueler was done, the meter suggested I had taken aboard 33.1 gallons in the left tank and 33.4 gallons in the right, a total of 66.5 gallons, 2.5 more than maximum. According to Mooney, that's all usable, so I could assume that figure for flight planning. I don't. I use the standard 64-gallon capacity instead.

    A deformed tank can be more common than you might imagine, and any deformation will almost always rob you of fuel capacity. After a friend with a Comanche 260 died of a heart attack many years ago, his widow asked me to maintain his airplane for her, taking it out for a walk every two months or so. She swore she'd never sell it, as it had been her late husband's beloved toy. Finally, reality intervened, and she asked me to sell it for her.

    To read the remainder of this article: CLICK HERE

    End of content

    No more pages to load