All Aviation Articles By keely

Kentucky Department Of Aviation Hosts "Aviation Day" 2012


 

- The mission of the Kentucky Department of Aviation is to provide a safe and secure air transportation system that ensures the mobility of people and goods, enhances economic prosperity, and preserves the quality of our environment and communities.

         “Aviation Day” was an absolute sell out this year! On September 22, 2012 the Kentucky Department of Aviation and the Kentucky National Guard hosted a warm and welcome, family oriented “Aviation day” out of Capital City Airport in Frankfort, Kentucky. The idea for this event was originally inspired by the Boone National Guard and the transportation cabinet of Kentucky, specifically the Department of Aviation. These groups came together in hopes of finding an event that might inspire families as well as the youth and teach them about aviation. “We want to get folks interested and involved in aviation” says the assistant director of The Kentucky Department of Aviation; Mr. Scott Shannon.

          This event was entirely free for all to attend and offered free flights for the youngsters ages 8 – 17. $10.00 flights were also offered to any and all grown-ups attending with hopes of flying. All proceeds that were collected went to the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education and these flights were made possible thanks to generous donations as well as a group known as the Young Eagles. There was much to see and do including the many various aircraft that were set up for display. Of these aircraft, the airport provided civilian, private as well as military airplanes and helicopters for viewing and touring. It felt like walking into a wealth of knowledge as blatant as a brick wall; this event had it all! The Civil Air patrol was also on site recruiting volunteers, as well as the National Guard. Even the humane society decided to join in for the fun and contributed with adopt-a-dog programs.

         The very first “Aviation Day” was held in the fall of 2002 and became an annual event until 2008. Now, thanks to all of the aviation fans in our community Aviation Day is back with a bang! Flights were made, and people were absolutely engulfed into the aviation world. The Civil Air Patrol even recruited my father. Capital City Airport will continue with its high hopes for success as they continue to pose fantastic opportunities for students to delve into the wild world of aviation head first. According to Mr. Scott Shannon, children just aren’t given the same opportunities that they once were in the aviation career field. “We want to change that, we want our students to experience flight in real life and we want to encourage them to experience this in a general aviation aircraft while continuing to educate them.” What better way to do that then host an annual aviation day where the doors are always open and the entry is always free?

If this event sounds like something that interests you, get involved! Aviation Day needs people that are hungry for knowledge and inspired by the aviation world!

For more information regarding next year’s event contact Mr. Scott Shannon:

Scott Shannon
Assistant Director,
Capital City Airport Division
90 Airport Road
Frankfort, KY 40601

Telephone: 502.564.0520
FAX: 502.564.0172
Website: cca.ky.gov

History In The Making For Ms. "Memphis Belle"


 
 

“We Used To Call It Luck” - Wayne Tabor

         On a non-stop flight from Brazil to Africa, Wayne Tabor is 21 years old. He is riding on the right side of the Boeing B-17, alert at all times because their carrier is under attack. He is a waist gunner and completely exposed as his squadron is rapidly approaching enemy boarders. He will complete 30 missions in a matter of 72 days averaging out to a rugged 6 missions per day over Nazi occupied Europe. Everything seems to move at the speed of light until you hear a “THUMP,” and then another “THUMP” all at once you realize, “these guys are trying to kill us!” Brace yourself as the enemy aircraft approaches you at 400 mph, too fast to rebut the blow; too fast to shoot down. “But fighting doesn’t solve anything” says Tabor “More than 26,000 lives were lost, 26,000 stories were never told. It’s just not worth it.”

          Tabor’s squadron eventually completed so many missions that they were grounded. Wayne Tabor stepped up and out of that Boeing B-17 and he did not return. That all changed September 24, 2012 when 93 year old Wayne Tabor made his way to Clark County airport and ventured back on to this aircraft after 72 years. “It brought back a lot of really good memories!” he stated with sheer certainty. “Whenever you watch television now-a-days, you see all of these crazy reality shows! THIS he said, while pointing to the B-17; fighting a war in this aircraft is the ultimate reality.”

         Upon meeting the pilot of this novel aircraft I quickly learned of the true value that has been invested here. The Pilot’s name was Mr. Ray Fowler; turns out he is an extremely successful and well rounded pilot. Mr. Fowler has been flying B-17 aircraft for 12 years now and everyday is a new adventure. “It never gets old” he declares. This beautiful four engine aircraft belongs to a 501(c)(3) non-profit flying museum known as The Liberty Foundation. Any funds that are generated immediately go back into this aircraft, simply offsetting the aircraft’s high cost of maintenance. The mere interest of the people is what keeps this aircraft alive and on tour. Thanks to the prevailing interests and generous donations of aviators throughout our country, this historic aircraft is still in flight today. Without the help of others, the Memphis Belle would surely be silenced and permanently placed in a museum.

         The Liberty Foundation’s Memphis Belle is in fact, one of only 13 remaining B-17’s that still fly today, as most of them were lost in European combat during the war. Lucky for us, this particular “Memphis Belle” was built toward the end of the war and never personally experienced any combat. It has however been painted to exactly match the original, historic “Memphis Belle” B-17 that flew countless missions with the 91st bomb group of the mighty 8th Air force; the first B-17 to complete 25 missions. Interestingly enough, The Liberty Foundation’s Memphis Belle happens to be the very same Memphis Belle that was hired for the filming of the Memphis Belle movie in England, 1989.

         The Liberty Foundation’s World War II Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress “Memphis Belle” is taking to the skies over Louisville, Kentucky on its first ever national tour. The Liberty Foundation’s B-17 is now on tour providing visitors with an exciting opportunity to take a step through time and learn more about the men and women who gave so much to protect our country. The Memphis Belle will be on tour for the next few weeks, making flight “missions” possible, without being shot down from the sky (we hope). With each “Mission” curious aviators will be invited to take wing in this historic aircraft where participants will receive a pre-flight safety briefing that contains historical significance of the aircraft as well as a spectacular scenic air tour around the city. During this flight, passengers will be encouraged to move freely about the cabin in order to enjoy the unique opportunity of visiting the various positions of a combat crew.

         Over the next few weeks the B-17 flight experience will also be available in the Indianapolis, Indiana, followed by St. Louis, Missouri, and Memphis, Tennessee. Public flights will begin in the mornings, followed by ground tours in the afternoon; the hours of operation are from 10am to 5pm each day. Your “mission” will take roughly 45 minutes to complete with approximately half an hour in flight. B-17 flights are $410.00 for Liberty Foundation members and $450.00 for all non-members. Passengers can become a Liberty Foundation Member for $40 and will in turn receive the member discount for all family and friends.

This is your invitation to take part in this upcoming weekend’s mission. The Liberty Foundation’s Boeing B-17 Memphis Belle will be in the Louisville, Kentucky area September 29 – 30, 2012 and it will be located at the Clark County air port in Sellersburg, Indiana. Have you gone for a flight in this aircraft previously? Tell us about it in a comment below! We would love to hear your stories!

Clark County Airport (KJVY)
Aircraft Specialists FBO
6005 Propeller Lane
Sellersburg, IN 47172


Call 918-340-0243 and schedule your flight today! To view the full schedule: follow - https://www.libertyfoundation.org/schedule.html

A Day Well Spent With Kentucky Aviators

         The Kentucky Aviation Association is a non-profit corporation promoting aviation facilities, safety, industry, business, recreation, as well as aerospace education throughout the Commonwealth of the state of Kentucky. This is an annual gathering that provides networking opportunities by bringing together aviation professionals, consultants, elected officials, as well as the leaders and support personnel of the Kentucky Department of Aviation and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The purpose of this conference is to fuse the various interests and talents of individuals and companies, bringing them together for discussions regarding issues and topics important to our local airports throughout Kentucky.

         On Friday September 7, 2012 I attended this convention, which was conveniently located at the Galt House in downtown Louisville this year. This would be my very first aviation conference and needless to say I was more nervous than a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs. No worries though, once I made my way to the registration desk I was well on my way to success. I was welcomed with sincere warmth as I registered and was promptly introduced to the president of the entire organization, Mr. Darrell Watson. Upon meeting this man I was extremely impressed by his unreserved professionalism. This man was immediately accommodating, gregarious and sincere; it was quite an honor to meet him. Upon thanking him for such a pleasant event, I continued into the general area for exhibitors. There were multiple booths set up in this room including companies such as the Kentuckians for Better Transportation (KBT), Loomacres Wildlife Management, Shell Aviation, PDC Consultants (Planning, Design, Construction) and Garver.There was even a booth set up for the aviation school of Eastern Kentucky at EKU.

         The conference agenda was packed with presenters and discussion topics beginning on Wednesday September 5, 2012. My attendance began on the following Friday which allowed me to attend and enjoy three discussions. This particular Friday commenced with a discussion regarding a Wildlife Hazard Management Plan from the United States Department of Agriculture.

Recently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has developed a program that provides Federal leadership and expertise in hopes of resolving wildlife conflicts that may threaten public health and safety, specifically in aviation. Increased air traffic as well as urban sprawl and enhanced noise suppression on aircraft is beginning to have effect concentrated populations of birds and other wildlife residing near our airports. This is causing accidental but potentially dangerous occurrences known as wildlife strikes. For those who do not know, a “strike” occurs when a bird or other animal directly collides with an aircraft. Research shows that this may occur while the aircraft is taking off, landing, or in the air. Wildlife strikes have greatly increased in the past 30 years and these often harmful occurrences are not likely to subside on their own. National Wildlife Research Center scientists have conducted the necessary research and are now providing the Federal Aviation Administration with vital information regarding these bird-to-aircraft strike hazards. This research is primarily focused on making the public aware of wildlife hazards at airports, as well as developing management tools to reduce these hazards, and providing biologists, airport personnel, and FAA officials with information regarding the latest strategies for controlling wildlife hazards.

         This discussion was followed by an important message concerning Aviation Education. Seeing as I am currently partaking in flight training and aspiring to become a pilot, this was exceptionally interesting to me. This discussion was held by the President/CEO of the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education; Dr. Tim Smith.

Dr. Smith states that the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education’s mission is to improve student learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and create career pathways in aerospace throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education, Inc is a non-profit, tax exempt organization devoted to its students’ limitless abilities and talents. The KIAE operates as an aerospace learning laboratory in collaboration with Frankfort HS Aviation Academy and fellow network schools. From this learning, the KIAE provides toolkits and other resources to schools in the network at no charge including flight kits, aircraft maintenance resources, as well as engineering materials. The KIAE's network of 14 high schools are providing students with experiences in aeronautical engineering, flight, aircraft maintenance, and space systems.

         The final discussion was in reference to the Aircraft Owner and Pilots Association and our last speaker of the day was regional manager, Bob Minter.

AOPA is the largest and most influential aviation association in the world. The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to general aviation. Originating in May 1939, AOPA provides member services that range from representation at the federal, state, and local levels to legal services, advice, and other assistance. AOPA has built a service organization that far exceeds any other in the aviation community, hosting a membership base of more than 400,000 pilots and aviation enthusiasts throughout the United States.

         In conclusion, The 2012 Kentucky Aviation Association conference was a wonderful experience. Not only is this an excellent opportunity to meet fellow pilots throughout the community, it is also the time and place to receive various answers for any opinions or questions that you may have. This conference will be held in Bowling Green next year, at the Holiday Inn University Plaza. I hope to attend the 2013 conference and would strongly recommend this event to anyone interested in aviation; reaching all the way out to the farthest corners of the state of Kentucky.

Split Second Weightlessness; Nobody Panic!

What is a stall? When someone refers to something as “stalling” what do you typically think of?

         A stall is something that I have always thought of as one of those “uh-oh” moments in life. This is one of those oh so special split second decision moments where you suddenly realize that you have done something silly or careless. You immediately go into panic-apology mode and begin rationalizing possible ways to go about eradicating whatever mistake you have just made.

         Somewhere in between my discovery flight and lesson 4, power-off stalls were introduced to me. These are also known as approach to landing stalls; this is due to the location where they are most prevalent and most likely to happen. Now, I am certainly no professional by any stretch of the word, but any time I’m 5,000 feet above ground level and someone tells me they want to “power off” anything, I freak out a little bit. Call me queasy, but this was something new. After several failed attempts to get out of it, I realized that this was just going to be another one of those things in life that I had to do. Upon learning of its utter magnitude throughout my private pilot training and inevitability in the end, during my check ride I decided to give in. Being the colossal fan of Google.com that I am, my first approach was to “Google” this new topic. Thanks to Dictionary.com, this is what I found:

Stall:

  • To stop running as a result of mechanical failure

  • To halt the motion or progress of; bring to a standstill. To cause a motor (or motor vehicle) to accidentally to stop running.

  • To cause (an aircraft) to go into a stall.


  • In the wild world of aviation; a stall refers to “a condition in which an aircraft or airfoil experiences an interruption of airflow resulting in loss of lift and a tendency to drop.”

    “As the wing angle of attack (AOA) increases to or beyond the critical AOA (approximately 16-20°), smooth airflow over the wing is disrupted, resulting in great increase in drag and loss of lift: a stall”


             Great, this is just exactly what my instincts as well as my stomach (which, during the actual stall was floating somewhere in my throat) had told me about this situation.” I thought. In that actual moment, I thought for sure I was going to die. Why in the world would this ever be a good idea? Better question, why in the world is this happening to me prior to completing lesson 4 of my flight training?

             Well let me tell you why. Most aircraft accidents occur either during a takeoff or during a landing. Being aware of the hazards associated with these phases of flight and knowing how to get yourself out of a bad situation can only make your flights safer. Power-off stalls simulate what would happen if ever there was an occurrence where the pilot was flying too slowly during the landing phase of the flight. The primary objective of a stall during training is to enhance safety in the student right away by helping assure inadvertent stall avoidance and/or prompt stall recovery. In order to assure stall avoidance the student pilot is responsible for understanding any and all flight situations where an unintentional stall may occur. Also, it is necessary to grasp the relationship of various factors relative to stall speed (Vs), be able to properly recognize the first indications of a stall as well as the proper recovery technique.

             Other things to be aware of as the pilot in charge include the relevant aerodynamic factors, flight situations, recovery procedures, as well as the hazards of uncoordinated stalling. Select entry altitude allowing recovery above 1,500 feet above ground level. Carefully watch your approach or landing configuration with throttle reduced or set to idle, straight glide with 30o, +10o bank while continuing to maintain attitude (this will induce a full stall.) Promptly recover by decreasing AOA, leveling wings, and adjusting power as necessary to regain normal attitude, retract flaps as well as gear and reestablish a climb. Finally, avoid a secondary stall, excessive airspeed or altitude loss, spins, or flight below 1,500 feet above ground level. As a student pilot performing a power off stall your objective is to familiarize yourself with the conditions that may produce a stall. Develop knowledge and skill in recognizing imminent and full stalls, as well as the well known habit of taking prompt preventive or corrective action. Overall, the objective of a power-off stall is to understand what could happen if controls were improperly used during a turn from the base leg to the final approach or on the final approach.

             In conclusion, I remember my very first power-off stall vividly! It was tremendously terrifying and I thought with sincere certainty that it would be the first and last of my approach to landing stalls. Clearly, my instructor handled the situation better than I had expected and was able to operate the vehicle enough to maneuver us out of that stall. Since then I have learned how to maneuver myself out of these stalls and usually am asked to perform at least one each time I fly. Not to worry, they absolutely have held onto me with full intensity and each power-off stall that I perform leaved me singed with virtually the same streak of fear. My stomach hovers and I panic for a split second in time, for fear that I may not recover. For now, I take it with a grain of salt. I bite my tongue, hold my breath and thrust the yolk forward with all I’ve got; hoping the little airplane and my instructor will have my back. One day I will be asked to perform such a task without Mr. Frames by my side; until then, well wish me luck!

    This is me and this is my story about approach to landing stalls. But I’m curious; do other pilots have similar fears upon performing their very first power-off stalls? Do older, professional pilots even remember their first power-off stall? I would like to ask my viewers, what are your thoughts and insights regarding these terrifying first few hours of flight training?

     

    Aviation Heroes Are Superheroes Too

             As I continue right along on my journey to “Pilot-hood” I’d like to discuss and share about two specific war heroes that I’ve learned to appreciate along the way. In my previous article I discussed an inspirational pilot who took me on as a private student and in turn became my very first flight instructor; Mr. Wagers. Sadly I must report, it is no longer this way, Mr. Wagers took another job and is no longer my private instructor. However, he had a plan (as I’m told all pilots should.) Mr. Wagers introduced me to an old friend of his that is also a CFI. His friend’s name is Mr. Frames, who conveniently enough also flies out of Indiana. Needless to say, Mr. Frames is now instructing me. Of course, Mr. Frames has his own style of teaching, his own habits and certainly his own punch lines; He’s a good man though and a great instructor! Throughout my time spent with Mr. Frames he has mentioned several different names of famous pilots that I should be aware of. Mr. Frames is a man very devoted to his job and yes, I have been assigned “homework.” So, on this particular day, I took it upon myself to do a little bit of research and find out just what this old bird was talking about.

             The first pilot that Mr. Frames mentioned was Captain Richard C. Mulloy; obviously I was completely and utterly oblivious. This name meant absolutely nothing to me. However, upon “Googling” his name I was astonished at the outcome, what an awesome person for Mr. Frames to teach me about! Richard C. Mulloy was known by employees and students of the Kentucky Flying Service as "Dick Mulloy," This man learned to fly in Tennessee in 1941, and once he finished his studies he entered the civilian pilot training program. Later he became a pilot instructor in the U.S. Army Primary Flying School, and eventually ended up flying C-46s and C-47s with the Flying Tigers over "The Hump" across the Himalayas in World War II.

             Following the war, Dick returned to Louisville, Kentucky and formed the Kentucky Flying Service, which was located at Bowman Field (KLOU.) He built the organization over the years, operating out of the large hanger where they overhauled, maintained, and sold aircraft. In addition, Dick is generally credited with training more pilots than anyone else in this particular part of the country. In 1987, Dick sold the Kentucky Flying Service, and 1992 he sold Helicopters Inc., completing 47 years of operations at Bowman Field. I thought it ironic that such an influential and heroic man lived out his aviation career as well as his life right here in our very own Louisville, Kentucky.

             Next Mr. Frames told me about a man named Terrence Wilcutt. Born on October 31, 1949, and a native of Louisville, Ky., Wilcutt earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in math from Western Kentucky University in 1974. He then taught high school math for two years before entering the Marine Corps in 1976 and earned his naval aviator wings in 1978. From 1980 until 1983, he was stationed in Kaneohe, Hawaii, and flew F-4 Phantoms during two overseas deployments to Japan, Korea and the Philippines. For the next three years, he served as an F/A-18 fighter weapons and air combat maneuvering instructor while assigned to Squadron VFA-125 at Lemoore Naval Air Station in California. At this time he had more than 6,600 flight hours in more than 30 different aircraft. (Wow!) Wilcutt joined NASA in 1990 as an astronaut candidate and was accepted into the corps in 1991. He logged more than 1,007 hours in space as the pilot on two shuttle missions, STS-68 in 1994 and STS-79 in 1996, and commander of two others, STS-89 in 1998 and STS-106 in 2000.

             Finally, effective as of September 1, 2011, Terrence W. Wilcutt was appointed NASA’s chief of safety and mission assurance.

             Needless to say, a search to find a hero in the aviation world is not a difficult one; you just have to know where to find them. The two men that I have met and worked with in aviation thus far were inspiration enough; however, these two veteran heroes simply blew my mind. Aside from their international achievements, they were both at one point in the very same place that I now find myself. Where there is a will there is a way.

    And again I’ll say “If you can dream it, you can do it.” –Walt Disney

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