Aircraft For Sale Aviation Articles

Jetcraft Opens New Office In Hong Kong To Better Serve Growing Market For New and Pre-owned Business Aircraft

 

New business unit Jetcraft Asia to best serve clients by blending industry expertise with regional market knowledge
 
RALEIGH, NC, Feb. 28, 2012 – Jetcraft Corporation, a provider of business aircraft sales, acquisitions, trading and brokerage services, today announced the opening of a new office in Hong Kong, China, under the Jetcraft Asia banner.

“We believe that this is the right time to establish a permanent presence in Asia,” says Chad Anderson, President, Jetcraft Corporation. “While we have been active in the region for years, we have done so without a formal presence. Based on the projected growth of the Asian – and particularly the Chinese – market, we are now directly serving the region. By blending our proven approach to business aircraft sales with a team of Hong Kong-based industry professionals, we believe that Jetcraft Asia will offer buyers and sellers superior market intelligence and an in-depth understanding of regional business and regulatory issues. Speaking for the entire Jetcraft team, we are very excited about this latest step in our company’s growth and evolution,” adds Mr. Anderson.
 
“From our new office in Hong Kong, we will be able to best represent client interests in Asia,” continues Jahid Fazal-Karim, Co-Owner and Board Member, Jetcraft Corporation. “Traditionally, the Asian market has favored new business aircraft. However, we predict a growing market for pre-owned aircraft, particularly in China, within the next five years. Locally-registered aircraft are likely to remain in China since transferring registration in-country is generally simpler than importing and registering aircraft. Given Jetcraft’s commitment to offer comprehensive services in multiple markets with consistent quality, establishing a permanent presence in Asia was the next logical step for us. Jetcraft Asia will leverage regional market knowledge and our proven approach to remarketing aircraft in order to tailor solutions for our clients globally, both within the region and from elsewhere – whether selling into or buying from Asia,” concludes Mr. Fazal-Karim.
 
For more information or to contact the Jetcraft Asia team, please visit
https://jetcraft.com/company/international-operations/

About Jetcraft Corporation
 
Jetcraft Corporation is an international leader in new and pre-owned business aircraft sales, acquisitions and trades. Headquartered in Raleigh, NC, Jetcraft has sales offices/representation in five US cities; Basel and Zurich, Switzerland; Dubai, UAE, Moscow, Russia and Hong Kong, China. The company’s 50-year-plus track record in aircraft transactions has earned it a world class customer base and one of the strongest global networks in the industry. Jetcraft Avionics LLC, a subsidiary of Jetcraft Corporation, provides distribution of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) for aftermarket business and wide body aircraft using Elbit-Kollsman’s state-of-the-art EVS-II and AT-HUD. For more information, please visit
www.jetcraft.com.

Cirrus reports growth despite uncertain economy

Cirrus reports growth despite uncertain economy

By Dan Namowitz of AOPA

Cirrus Aircraft reported increased production during the third quarter in an announcement that differentiated company performance from overall industry statistics showing a slowing rate of decline in aircraft deliveries

During the third quarter, Cirrus completed 68 new aircraft, seven more than during the third quarter of 2010, said Todd Simmons, vice president of sales and marketing. Although only 48 deliveries were reflected in the third-quarter industry report released by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, "an additional 20 aircraft were completed in Duluth, Minn., and are currently in transit to the Civil Aviation Flight University of China (CAFUC) in Luoyang, China," Cirrus said in a news release.

Cirrus cited market-share statistics and strengthening revenue as highlights of the reporting period, pointing to a 37-percent share of the single-engine piston, tricycle-gear, certified aircraft sector versus 32 percent for its closest competitor (which according to GAMA figures appears to be Cessna), and a 77-percent share of the high-performance four-seat airplane market. Average revenue per aircraft increased 20 percent over the 2010 third quarter, Cirrus said.

Cirrus also noted nonfinancial milestones that occurred during the period.

The company delivered its tenth and final Limited Commemorative Edition SR22T, a model developed to recognize the anniversary of the first SR22 delivery in 2001. Another landmark event occurred at AOPA Aviation Summit in Hartford, Conn., in September, when Cirrus delivered its 5,000th SR-Series airplane—a production achievement the company heralded as "an astounding accomplishment in aviation" because it occurred in "just over a decade."

Simmons ventured a cautious outlook for the industry, but also optimistic, "especially when you add in the most generous tax incentives ever for U.S. customers."

"At the same time, we are still facing the challenge of a stubbornly slow recovery in the traditional North American and European general aviation markets, and currency fluctuations and economic uncertainty remain present in so many countries around the world," the company said.

On the research and development front, Cirrus reported steady progress on the Cirrus Vision SF50 personal jet program, noting that "exciting program announcements are just ahead."

Cutter Aviation, Southwest U.S. Dealer for Quest KODIAK, to Deliver First KODIAK in December

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 3, 2011

 

Cutter Aviation, Southwest U.S. Dealer for Quest KODIAK, to Deliver First KODIAK in December
Cutter Aviation Aircraft Sales, the Authorized Dealer for Quest KODIAK in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, S. Nevada and S. California will take delivery of KODIAK, s/n 100-0061 in December

 

PHOENIX, AZ. — Cutter Aviation is happy to announce that it will be accepting and delivering the first Quest KODIAK for the Southwestern U.S. dealer territory from Quest Aircraft Company in December 2011.  Cutter Aviation Aircraft Sales was announced as the Authorized New Aircraft Dealer for Quest KODIAK for the Southwest U.S. in August 2011 at EAA AirVenture by Quest Aircraft Company. Cutter Aviation Aircraft Sales is excited to bring KODIAK s/n 100-0061 to the region and demonstrate the KODIAK’s modern, rugged and powerful STOL capabilities while carrying high useful loads to every runway from modern urban airports to remote backcountry airstrips.

 

Powered by the reliable Pratt & Whitney PT6A-34 turboprop engine, the Quest KODIAK can take off in under 1,000 feet at full gross weight and climb at over 1,300 feet per minute.  Configured for straight cargo or up to 10-seat in a passenger layout, the KODIAK features the latest Garmin G1000 flightdeck and can easily handle unimproved airstrips.  Additionally the KODIAK is configurable for water operations with floats or amphibs without structural upgrades as the airframe was designed for such operations originally.

 

“The Quest KODIAK is truly a perfect aircraft for owners and operators in the Southwest United States” said R.D. Wooten, Regional Quest KODIAK Sales Manager for Cutter Aviation Aircraft Sales. “The vast stretches of sparsely populated and rugged landscape in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and California requires a flexible utility aircraft like the KODIAK to get the job done.”

 

Wooten adds, “Combine it with the challenging terrain and the number of remote ranches, drilling and mining operations, outposts and even communities in the region that are only easily accessible by air and it’s easy to see why the KODIAK fits the needs of our customers in the Southwest.”

 

The Quest KODIAK s/n 100-0061 being delivered in December by Cutter Aircraft Sales will feature premium options such as the larger 29” Tire upgrade package, four additional Timberline passenger seats, air conditioning and the Garmin GDL 69A-XM Data Link with Audio Infotainment package to give it the utmost utility capabilities for customers within the Southwest.

 

Cutter Aviation Aircraft Sales is an Authorized New Aircraft Dealer for Quest Aircraft Company and represents Quest KODIAK in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Southern Nevada (Clark County) and Southern and Central California (following counties: Fresno, Imperial, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Stanislaus, Tulare, Tuolumne, Ventura).  For more information on Cutter Aviation Quest KODIAK Aircraft Sales, please visit: https://www.cutteraircraftsales.com/Quest-KODIAK.

 

About Cutter Aviation

Founded in 1928 by William P. Cutter, Cutter Aviation is a full-service aviation company, offering aircraft fuel/line services, maintenance and avionics solutions, aircraft charter and aircraft sales and management. Cutter Aviation operates from eight major airports in five states within the Southwestern United States including: Arizona (Phoenix-Deer Valley and Phoenix-Sky Harbor), New Mexico (Albuquerque), Colorado (Colorado Springs), California (Carlsbad) and Texas (Dallas-McKinney, El Paso and San Antonio). The company is a member of the Pinnacle Air Network, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the National Air Transportation Association (NATA). Cutter Aviation is the oldest continuously family-owned and operated FBO (Fixed Base Operator) in the United States with over 83 years of serving the General & Business Aviation industry. For more information about Cutter Aviation, please visit www.cutteraviation.com

Last Quarter 2011 Market Condition Report

LAST QUARTER 2011 MARKET CONDITION REPORT

Globalair Article – November 2011 By Jeremy R.C. Cox

In March 2009 I wrote an article for Globalair.com that was Titled: ”The Not So Great Depression”,
you can re-read this by clicking on this link:
https://blog.globalair.com/post/The-Not-So-Great-Depression.aspx

I wrote that piece whilst we were all living under the developing fall-out that was created as a
direct result of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) that was first felt in the late summer of the previous
year, and was later proved to have started a full year before then (2007.)

The purpose of this article is to attempt to track just how far the Used Business Aircraft Market has
managed to pull itself away from the stinging clutches of GFC. I will use a statistical analysis process
that is fuelled by the numbers available to me through my subscription to AMSTAT. I will let you draw
your own conclusion as to where we currently stand overall, however it would be remiss of me if I didn’t
state that I believe that the Used Business Aircraft Market is on-track to achieve a soon to be issued
clean bill of health.

 

IT IS ALL IN THE NUMBERS, I.E. THE ‘PERCENTAGE FOR SALE’

November 2005 – Baseline

10,207 Turbo-Props, 1,127 or 11.04% were available for Sale

5,757 Light Jets, 833 or 14.47% were available for Sale

4,967 Medium Jets, 544 or 10.95% were available for Sale

3,180 Large Jets, 279 or 8.77% were available for Sale

 

November 2007 – Pre GFC Effect

11,121 Turbo-Props, 928 or 8.34% were available for Sale

6,417 Light Jets, 812 or 12.65% were available for Sale

5,757 Medium Jets, 584 or 10.14% were available for Sale

3,728 Large Jets, 267 or 7.16% were available for Sale

 

November 2009 – Within The Depths of GFC

12,049 Turbo-Props, 1,503 or 12.47% were available for Sale

7,285 Light Jets, 1,313 or 18.02% were available for Sale

6,568 Medium Jets, 1,098 or 16.72% were available for Sale

4,233 Large Jets, 597 or 14.10% were available for Sale

 

November 2011 – Emerging From GFC

12,616 Turbo-Props, 1,350 or 10.70% were available for Sale

7,615 Light Jets, 1,198 or 15.73% were available for Sale

6,826 Medium Jets, 924 or 13.54% were available for Sale

4,612 Large Jets, 554 or 12.01% were available for Sale

SUMMARY GRAPH SHOWING HISTORICAL TO CURRENT PERCENTAGE FOR SALE

 

As you can see from the numbers and the associated Graph, the Percentage-for-sale ‘Peak’ came
approximately
in 2009 (Light Jets peaked at 18% Mid 2009, while the rest all peaked in late 2009.)
We are about halfway back
to normal therefore 2012/2013 are looking like they might be ‘rock-solid.’

 

THE TIME IT TAKES TO SELL IN TOUGH TIMES

 

How long does it take to sell an Aircraft? Statistically for the same Groups, one can track the Number of
Days
On Market, i.e. the Average calendar time period in days from Initial Listing For Sale until Deal Closing.
The numbers are as follows:

November 2005 – Baseline

Average Days On Market for all Turbo-Props was 505

Average Days On Market for all Light Jets was 498

Average Days On Market for all Medium Jets was 436

Average Days On Market for all Large Jets was 447

 

November 2007 – Pre GFC Effect

Average Days On Market for all Turbo-Props was 492

Average Days On Market for all Light Jets was 517

Average Days On Market for all Medium Jets was 382

Average Days On Market for all Large Jets was 409

 

November 2009 – Within The Depths of GFC

Average Days On Market for all Turbo-Props was 420

Average Days On Market for all Light Jets was 471

Average Days On Market for all Medium Jets was 357

Average Days On Market for all Large Jets was 376

 

November 2011 – Emerging From GFC

Average Days On Market for all Turbo-Props was 553

Average Days On Market for all Light Jets was 588

Average Days On Market for all Medium Jets was 471

Average Days On Market for all Large Jets was 459

SUMMARY GRAPH SHOWING AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET

 

 

What is really interesting about this graph is the fact that when an Aircraft MUST be sold ASAP, it is
‘Right-Priced’ and sold in less time than normal. The Lowest number of Days occurred immediately after
GFC showed it despicable face to us all.

Now for the Same Aircraft Groups we shall focus on the Average Year of Manufacture for each Group:

 

AGE AFFECTS POPULARITY

November 2005 – Baseline

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Turbo-Props was 1982

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Light Jets was 1983

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Medium Jets was 1985

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Large Jets was 1982

 

November 2007 – Pre GFC Effect

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Turbo-Props was 1984

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Light Jets was 1985

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Medium Jets was 1988

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Large Jets was 1985

 

November 2009 – Within The Depths of GFC

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Turbo-Props was 1987

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Light Jets was 1989

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Medium Jets was 1992

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Large Jets was 1992

 

November 2011 – Emerging From GFC

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Turbo-Props is 1988

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Light Jets is 1990

Average For-Sale Year of Manufacture for all Medium Jets is 1992

AVERAGE AGES OF FOR SALE AIRCRAFT ARE GETTING YOUNGER, AS THE FLEET AGES

 

 

SPECIFIC MODELS

 

The following figures are quite enlightening as to the issue of Age and Obsolescence:

 

Year of Manufacture

1985

1981

1976

1978

1983

1979

 

MU2 Solitare

Merlin IIIB

Learjet 25B

Sabreliner 75A

Challenger 600

Gulfstream II

 

 $1,375,000.00

 $1,795,000.00

 $1,297,500.00

 $2,990,000.00

 $9,000,000.00

 $7,775,000.00

Year of Analysis

MU2 Solitare

Merlin IIIB

Learjet 25B

Sabreliner 75A

Challenger 600

Gulfstream II

Nov-05

 $900,600.

 $ 828,800.

 $645,000.

 $683,000.

 $4,395,000.

 $ 2,912,692.

Nov-06

 $910,727.

 $767,475.

 $715,833.

 $513,333.

 $5,412,857.

 $3,007,333.

Nov-07

 $834,800.

 $883,494.

 $590,000.

 $629,000.

 $5,297,222.

 $2,696,000.

Dec-08

 $891,500.

 $963,132.

 $520,625.

 $825,000.

 $4,626,667.

 $2,171,574.

Nov-09

 $841,128.

 $930,000.

 $648,875.

 $666,666.

 $2,815,594.

 $908,890.

Dec-10

 $824,480.

 $706,600.

 $496,642.

 $499,900.

 $2,163,333.

 $819,928.

Nov-11

 $728,800.

 $717,750.

 $485,500.

 $350,000.

 $1,665,625.

 $826,691.

OBSELETE AIRCRAFT (BASED UPON VALUES)

Year of Manufacture

2002

2005

2003

2000

2001

1999

 

Socata TBM700B

King Air 350

Cessna CJ1

Hawker 800XP

Challenger 604

Gulfstream V

 

 $2,512,390.

 $5,881,474.

 $4,024,000.

 $11,895,000.

 $23,235,000.

 $39,100,000.

Year of Analysis

Socata TBM700B

King Air 350

Cessna CJ1

Hawker 800XP

Challenger 604

Gulfstream V

Nov-05

 $2,071,153.

 $2,651,666.

 $3,554,500.

 $10,208,000.

 $18,500,000.

 $36,573,333.

Nov-06

 $1,905,833.

 $3,658,333.

 $3,374,500.

 $9,768,000.

 $18,700,000.

 $33,950,000.

Nov-07

 $1,850,000.

 $4,211,923.

 $3,610,000.

 $9,158,214.

 $22,315,000.

 $45,000,000.

Dec-08

 $1,859,875.

 $3,633,947.

 $3,552,222.

 $8,918,700.

 $20,675,000.

 $38,683,333.

Nov-09

 $1,685,556.

 $3,594,565.

 $2,944,750.

 $5,852,250.

 $13,140,455.

 $25,185,714.

Dec-10

 $1,634,989.

 $2,941,500.

 $2,641,500.

 $4,610,313.

 $13,289,000.

 $26,247,500.

Nov-11

 $1,587,857.

 $3,034,211.

 $2,299,087.

 $4,080,909.

 $11,356,250.

 $26,400,000.

CURRENT OR NEAR CURRENT PRODUCTION AIRCRAFT

With all that said I believe you can see that the market is progressing and should you be condsidering
the next step please review
Globalair.com - Aircraft Exchange.  Very current with aircraft, tools to use
such as A.Buyer and comparison tool.  If you are thinking it you might want to use Globalair.com.

See you next Month!

Oh...that Airplane Smell!

Some things in life are just quintessentially perfect. You know it instinctively deep-down in your heart without having to ever consciously ask yourself...”do I like this; is this right?” Some experiences like this can be sensed rather than defined, much like spirituality. One item on this list of perfect things for me is that unique scent that all aircraft emit and pervade while either sitting quietly in a hangar, or dancing through the skies.

Even though I often think, tongue-in-cheek of the modified words of Robert Duvall in the 1979 epic Apocalypse Now where he says (and I substitute): “Smell that?..You smell that?..Nothing in the world smells like that...I love the smell of Jet-Fuel in the morning!”; this happens to me every-time that I park my car and get out at the Spirit of St. Louis Airport where my office is.

Coupled with the smell of burnt aviation kerosene, another sensory trigger for me is the noise as well. Unfortunately in this modern age of carbon credit-touting politically correct twits, black-smoke belching-ear splitting jet exhausts have overall been relegated to the past. It is a rare event now when a straight-pipe turbojet flies in and out of my home airport (thankfully we do have several Sabre 60’s that occasionally blast into the skies), but nothing compares to a venerable Stage-Two Gulfstream, or a Viper-powered Hawker, or a Learjet 23. I’m sorry but all three of these birds are music to my ears!

Airshows are about the only places now where you can still joyfully live through and cower under that glorious noise and black smoke. My trigger is tripped when I talk about the type of sonic wave that you get to feel on the inside of your insides. Of course your heart strings are a-twanging and you might have sweaty palms from the adrenaline that is being mainlined directly into your bloodstream so yes you are felling this great noise and spectacle; however I talking about that ribcage thing where you’re largest body cavity, your chest and stomach resonate like a guitar body. That type of cachophany is so great that you experiment to see if the intensity in your guts changes if you open and close your mouth. Without an afterburning jet-pipe available to you, a similar type of resonance can be frequently experienced by bashing on a bass drum that came from a parade band. I guess that gut sounds like those are just instinctual and therefore they race to the core of the many men out there like me.

Jets are all fine and dandy, but real aircraft are constructed from wood, dope and fabric, and the only true path to achieving mental nirvana is in my opinion, the time spent around a flying machine that has a smoke-soot-oil-fire-breathing radial or V12 behemoth bolted to it. Sex doesn’t even start to describe the emotions stirred within by one of these witchy-beauties!

So let’s get back to the premise of this article: ‘that smell thing.’

Most aircraft today are manufactured by the mating of aluminium, steel, copper, plastic, rubber and a touch of leather to complete their creation. Added to these smells is the aroma of hydraulic fluid, engine oil, 100LL or Jet-A. This amalgam of scents produce a heady bouquet that will turn the head of even the most casual observer as they point their eyes and nose towards the emitter of that lovely smell. These smells communicate soul-to-soul as far as I’m concerned.

The true connoisseur however has a demanding nose that won’t get out of bed for this modern- aviation smell as described above. No the only thing to get the died-in-the-wool enthusiast’s Goosebumps raised is the delectable perfume created by the symbiotic relationship created and found in harmony within the structures of a wood and fabric aircraft of the time period between the wars of the 20th century. Forgive me for being rude towards the earlier aircraft of that age, but personally I don’t savour much the smell of castor oil which was predominate in the total-loss oil systems found on many early aero engines.

I have an uncle in England who made a deep impression on me at a young and tender age, one weekend when he and my aunt motored down to our farm in the Westcountry from London in a Porsche. His words were: “Cor I bloody love this car, because it smells just like it would if I was riding inside a lady’s handbag.” Strange words many of you might think, but you know what uncle, I get it!

To make my eyes glaze over just add the following ingredients all mixed together in the shape of a DH82 Tiger-Moth, or DH98 Mosquito:
• Freshly mown grass
• Sitka Spruce
• Mahogany and Birch plywood
• Balsa
• Aerolite resin
• Butyrate doped Mercerized cotton
• Tanned cowskin leather
• Cochineal sozzeled control cables
• Petrol grease
• Mineral hydraulic and engine oils
• High-octane aviation spirit
• Natural India rubber
• Aeroshell 7 grease
• Canvas webbing
• Compass fluid
• Varnish

Oh, that beautiful airplane smell! Who says that machines can never have a soul?

What does your favourite airplane smell like?