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VIP Terminal Extension at Belfast International Airport Granted

by Joe McDermott 9. January 2017 10:36
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Where safety, efficiency and outstanding customer service are the founding principles of the organisation!

7st January 2016, Belfast International Airport/EGAA, Northern Ireland

Barely 18 months after opening their full service FBO at Belfast International Airport, Global Trek Aviation has been granted permission by the airport to extend their FBO facility building by 100%!

Back in mid 2015 GTA may have been a new start up but with a team of highly experienced industry professionals who had worked for such companies as Landmark Aviation, Ocean Sky and RSS across the UK it quickly became a success!

At Belfast International they built a brand new facility which included a very spacious VIP lounge, crew centre, showers and Operations Control Centre next to the GA Ramp. The facility boasts excellent privacy with its own secure entrance and car park well away from the commercial terminal.

On the ramp an impressive GSE display includes two Jet A-1 trucks (43,000 Litre and 17,000 Litre), three diesel tugs, three Houchin 690-C GPU, 2 wide bodied air stairs, Lav truck, potable water truck, as well as their VIP ground transportation fleet.

Global Trek MD David McColm comments “Our facility has been getting busier by the month and we have taken the decision to plan for future growth at an early stage. Doubling the floor space will allow us to provide even greater comfort for our clients, put in additional amenities and expand our Operations Control Centre to keep up with customer demand”

Brian Carlin, Belfast International Airports Director of Commercial Development in welcoming the expansion plans said “Global Trek has shown the depth of their industry experience and commitment by hitting the ground running, delivering a first class experience to their clients and investing in infrastructure, GSE and personnel training from the very start”

Belfast International Airport Managing Director Graham Keddie added “Global Trek Aviation are proving that BFS is the ideal fuel stop location for corporate, ferry and medevac Transatlantic flights as well as a destination airport.

General Manager Gordon Bingham & Flight Supervisor Philip Armstrong from the The Global Trek Aviation team will be present at SDC2017, Booth 1928

Belfast International Airport, N. Ireland, EGAA/BFS

Belfast International Airport, just 11.5 NM north-west of Belfast City, is the ideal located for North Atlantic tech stops. The airport is CAT IIIB and operates 24H with no curfew restrictions. Multiple runways (9100’ +) ensure no congestion slot restrictions and short taxi times. Global Trek Aviation, with two Jet A-1 trucks dedicated to their clients offer both fast turnaround times and excellent competitive fuel prices.

The airport is owned by Airports Worldwide Inc., the same company which owns Stockholm Skavsta, Orlando Sanford International Airport, Daniel Oduber Quirós International Airport, Mariscal Sucre International Airport and Juan Santamaría International Airport.

OCC EGAA Tel: +0044 289 454546 (24H) OCC EGAA Email: BFS@globaltrekaviation.com Media Contact: David@GlobalTrekAviation.com www.GlobalTrekAviation.com

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Airports | Joe McDermott

Dogs in Aviation

by Tori Williams 1. December 2016 20:05
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Piper the Airport Operations Dog. Image via www.airportk9.org

I recently had the opportunity to adopt a puppy from a local animal shelter. My new puppy is a Shiba Inu with a lot of energy. She’s instantly become a big part of my life (mostly because she’s so needy and needs constant supervision until she’s housebroken) and it got me thinking about how dogs can fit into the wide world of aviation.

Most people think of the pain of traveling with animals when they think of bringing animals into aviation. However, there are several ways that dogs have been brought into aviation to do a job or accomplish a mission. I have collected some of the most fascinating examples of these dogs and I would like to share them with you.

Airport Operations Dog

A video went viral a few months back featuring Piper the K-9 Wildlife Management Specialist at Cherry Capital Airport in Michigan. The dog works closely with his Operations Specialist owner who drives him around to chase away any wildlife that is a hazard to airport operations. Wildlife can be a huge problem at airports, and sometimes using flares and traps isn’t enough. He appears to love having such an important job, and getting to run around chasing his natural enemies away must be rewarding as well.

Airport Security Dog

I have encountered airport drug sniffing dogs several times during my travels. These large, serious-looking dogs walk up and down the lines heading towards TSA. They have a mission to find drugs or hazardous materials that passengers may be trying to smuggle past security. They are extremely good at their jobs and help add an extra layer of protection to the airport with their superior sniffers.

Lost and Found Dog

Another viral video sensation, which unfortunately turned out to be staged, featured the adorable beagle named Sherlock who returns lost items to passengers on KLM. The PR stunt was done incredibly well, as the majority of people who saw the video (myself included) were completely convinced that dear Sherlock was a real full-time employee of the airline. Although the story was not 100% true, I could totally see a dog with an excellent sense of smell and memory being able to do that job.

Airport Stress Relief Dogs

As I mentioned in my previous article about stress relief, an even increasing number of airports are having volunteers with stress-relief or emotional support dogs come to greet passengers and hopefully make their days a little better. These furry friends help anxious passengers feel calm and comforted. I believe this is an incredibly valuable service, especially during the holidays when passengers who do not regularly fly are on their way to family and friends.

Additional Note on Taking Your Dog Flying

One of the things I was most excited about when I got my new puppy was being able to take her with me to fly-ins during the summer. Thankfully she does great in car rides so I am hoping this will translate to her first plane ride as well. AOPA has a wonderful article outlining tips for flying in your general aviation plane with your dog. It discusses restraints, food and water, motion sickness, oxygen, hearing, and traveling with your dog outside of the U.S. I highly recommend reading it in its entirety before you take your dog for a plane ride. Being safe and knowledgeable will make the flight all the more fun for you and your dog!

I hope this list has helped you see that integrating dogs into aviation can be beneficial and amazing for airports and the dogs themselves. There are a lot of opportunities for well-trained dogs to make a difference in the world. Aviation is a great field for it!

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Airports

Top 5 Interesting Airport Facts

by Tori Williams 1. November 2016 20:30
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This semester has been one long lesson into all things airport operations related. When I am not at school taking such classes as Airport Operations and Aviation Administration Decision Making, I am at the Lexington airport soaking up knowledge from my airport operations internship. I have never had a semester where I felt I experienced and could apply the material I was learning in such a way as this. I have been extremely blessed with my internship and the amazing professors at Eastern.

In a strange way, my lessons outside of the classroom have lined up perfectly with the lessons in class more times than I can count. For example, we had a lesson about airport wildlife management at school and then during my time at the airport that day we encountered birds, deer, and checked the wildlife traps. My coworkers are very good at turning things we encounter into learning moments, so I have heard countless stories and gotten hands-on experience with a lot of things my classmates are only reading about.

During this awesome semester I have learned a few airport facts that truly surprised me. I gathered my top five to share here.

1. Airports make an enormous percentage of their revenue from parking

I was surprised to find out that of the overall revenue that airports acquire, non-aeronautical revenue accounts for nearly half of the total. This exact number of their non-aeronautical revenue is 44.8%, according to one study. Parking and transportation alone contribute to 41.2% of the total revenue, putting it in a category of its own. This is one of those facts that make sense if you think about it, after all airports almost always charge for parking and thousands of cars come through every day. Several major airports also contract out parking. Companies will bid on a parking contract and whoever wins is in charge of parking at that airport. This seems to be efficient for both the airport and the parking companies.

2.TSA is under a microscope

Nobody particularly enjoys going through TSA, and it often seems ridiculous to have to remove your belt and shoes to not be a threat to national security. However, one fascinating thing I have learned is that TSA often gets tested themselves. The TSA inspector will occasionally send volunteers, usually new airport employees who have not been seen by TSA yet, though the TSA security line with explosives or other prohibited items stashed in their carry-on. In some cases, they will even strap the prohibited substance to the bodies of the volunteers to see if the TSA screener can find it that way. The supervisor on shift is made aware before testing begins so they will be prepared and not let the screener call airport police on the volunteer. Thankfully Lexington has been extremely successful in their testing, but other airports have not been so lucky.

3. Airports send birds to The Smithsonian

Whenever there is a bird strike and the airport cannot discern the species of bird, they must send DNA to The Smithsonian. That can be feathers, a sample of the bird guts, or both, depending on the state of the animal when they are found. The Smithsonian then analyzes the DNA to accurately identify the species of bird, and returns that information to the airport to include in their wildlife strike report.

4. Airport record keeping is insane

One thing I instantly noticed about working in operations is that there are dozens of large, thick binders filled with papers that they are constantly referencing, updating, and archiving. The airport is required to keep certain records for up to two years. That means that even if someone hasn’t worked at the airport in a year and a half, they still have a massive binder dedicated to them with all of their training records. Other binders include the unofficial version of the airport certification manual, dozens of maps of the airfield, badging applications, and many more that I have not yet seen. Someone could easily spend days reading these binders and not see half of the material the airport keeps on hand.

5. Airport expansion is very complicated

Commercial and GA airports alike face a number of challenges when it comes to growth. Many communities do not understand how great aviation can be for their local economy, so they oppose runway expansion projects and even the simplest changes to the airport. I found it particularly interesting using Lexington as a case study, as their airport is surrounded by horse farms owned by some of the biggest names in horse breeding and racing. It would be extremely difficult for them to expand because of the value of the land around them. Airports constantly have to balance growth with community relations, far more than several other industries.

I hope that you have learned at least one interesting fact by reading this article, and I can’t wait to learn more as I become more knowledgeable on airport operations! It is a whole world of intricacies and innovations that I am lucky to be part of!

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Airports | Tori Williams

Are You Working SMARTer?

by Lydia Wiff 1. July 2016 08:00
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There’s an old saying: “Work smarter, not harder.”  I can’t tell you how many times someone has told me that, or I’ve had to tell myself that.  It’s so easy for me to get into the rut of approaching a goal from a disorganized process – it becomes an arduous process that has little to no intrinsic value, seems to drag on forever, and ultimately becomes a discouraging and frustrating process.  Today I’ll cover a common (or is it?) approach to accomplishing goals that has helped me to work SMARTer and not harder.

What Are SMART Goals? – A little history

In the early 19th century, a fellow by the name of Elbert Hubbard, a renowned American philanthropist, observed that many individuals would fail in their endeavors.   He concluded that they failed not because they had little intelligence or where with all, but because they failed to organize their efforts around a goal.  However, it wasn’t until the late 20th century that a new method arrived in the form of SMART goals.

Later, in 1981, we find the first record of the SMART acronym written down in a paper published by George T. Doran, a consultant and former Director of Corporate Planning for Washington Water Power Company entitled “There’s a S.M.A.R.T. Way to Write Management’s Goals and Objectives”. While the SMART acronym words have changed over the years, the overall concept has remained the same – it approaches goals in an organized fashion to maximize one’s efforts.  So, let’s dive into SMART with some definitions and some examples.

S Stands for “Specific”

I like to equate the first step in the SMART process to choosing a topic for that thesis.  You may love airplanes, but you can’t just write on every airplane.  It’s hard to write an exhaustive paper with such a subject that folks can read in its entirety before falling asleep.

In the same way, a goal must be very specific.  Too broad and you find yourself getting frustrated because you don’t seem to make much progress – too narrow and you may not be feeling very challenged or accomplished.

A good example of a specific goal is to say: “My goal is to get my Instrument Rating.”  An example of a non-specific goal is: “I want to fly.”  The difference is that a specific goal has a narrow focus, i.e., the Instrument Rating, as opposed to a general want to fly.

So, let’s run with the goal of an Instrument Rating for the rest of our SMART process.

M Stands for “Measurable”

To be measureable, a goal should be shaped in such a way as to measure success or progress.  For instance, when training for an instrument rating, you should be able to measure your success upon completing the hours of training, completing ground school, or taking the written and practical exam (and passing).

Too often we get into a rut where we’re working on some project, but don’t really have a way to measure what we’ve accomplished, or not accomplished.  This could be especially challenging when studying for the Instrument written exam, but perhaps try approaching it by measuring your progress based on what chapters or sections you have studied.  It might help to break the study guide into sections and measure your progress that way.

 

A Stands for “Attainable”

I often feel like this third step should really be somewhere closer to the beginning of the acronym just because it could save you a lot of time and grief.  That being said, it is an important step, regardless of where it is placed.

Having a goal that is attainable in the first place is crucial in your success in accomplishing a goal.  For instance, you really can’t make a goal to get your Instrument Rating if you don’t even have your Private Pilot’s License (PPL) yet.  If you find yourself in that position of needing one thing to make another goal happen, this might be the point to go back to the beginning and further narrow the specificity of your goal.

For instance, “My goal is to get my PPL, so I can get my Instrument Rating.”  Now you have your true starting point, which is getting that PPL.  This narrowed focus allows you to discover the underlying action items for a particular goal, or to realize that one goal is really subset of another goal.

R Stands for “Realistic”

This goal seems to go hand-in-hand with the previous goal, but not always.  This step really seems to fit into the phrase “time and money.”  For instance, you may have the time (it’s attainable), but you may not have the money (it’s not realistic).  I actually experienced this the first year I was at the University of North Dakota (UND). 

I had the time to get my Instrument, and eventually my Commercial Ratings, but I didn’t have the money.  So, while my goal was specific, measureable and attainable, it wasn’t realistic because dollar bills really do make an airplane fly.  If you get to this point and realize your goal isn’t realistic, it’s very important to not get discouraged and give up.  It really means that you need to further narrow your focus into something a little more specific.

Now, I can speak from experience that giving up something as enjoyable and rewarding as flying is not easy.  However, finding an alternate path, maybe a diversion of sorts, is a very smart option.  When I realized this, I chose to switch degree programs from Commercial Aviation to Airport Management.  This switch kept me in the field of aerospace and aviation, and I found that I really enjoy the business side of aviation, but I still get my dose of being an aviation nerd.  I also found out I love being around airports almost as much as being in the airplane.

I haven’t given up flying altogether, but I’ve adjusted my course to include those additional flight ratings down the road when that goal becomes more realistic.

T Stands for “Time-Bound”

Lastly, we come to having our goals being time-bound. 

Let’s start with a bad example of this: “I want to get my Instrument Rating sometime in the future.”  Now, we can see right away this is going to be a problem.  This gets us into the mindset that we’ll finish it sometime, and then sometime comes and we still haven’t made any progress.  This is frustrating, to say the least, and really is a hindrance to accomplishing some very specific goals.  A lack of a deadline actually keeps great people from accomplishing great things!

Now, a good example of a time-bound goal is: “I want to get my Instrument Rating by next June.”  Now, this is good!  You have a rough date and you know what you need to do to accomplish this goal.  You can further break down this goal by planning to take the ground school for 7 weeks in the fall, start your actual flight instruction after that, and then schedule your written exam in early spring, and practical exam by June.  You could further be specific by putting in actual dates and updating your progress as you go in addition to deciding how much time per week (or day) to spend working towards that goal.

The great thing is, you can be very flexible as long as you don’t get into the habit of doing something maybe someday.

Work SMARTer, Not Harder

Overall, I wouldn’t say that the SMART process is a fail-proof method, but it has been very successfully used by individuals, management, and corporations alike.  However, you can’t just plug things in and go.  You need to commit to following a goal through and periodically reevaluating your progress as you go and make changes as needed.

So, do you have a goal that you used the SMART process on that you’d like to share with our readers?  Feel free to comment below with your story and how you used the SMART method.

Happy SMART Planning!

Images courtesy of Google.com.

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Flying | GlobalAir.com | Airports | Lydia Wiff

You Know You're A Minnesota Pilot When...

by Lydia Wiff 1. June 2016 08:00
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Being a huge fan of Minnesota (born and raised, ya sure, you betcha) I’m pretty sure that Minnesota pilots are a special breed.  As summer is just around the corner, I’ll be highlighting some Minnesota-type flying activities that you’re sure to find those Minnesota-inclined pilots heading too when the days get longer and warmer.

Your Saturdays Consist of Coffee, Donuts, & Safety

Let’s face it:  safety should be our #1 focus in aviation.  While we may not all practice what we preach, there’s a long-time tradition of mixing coffee, donuts, and safety all into a fun Saturday tradition in the Twin Cities area.

 

Several years ago, my old boss from Inflight Pilot Training, LLC, started weekly safety seminars at Flying Cloud Municipal Airport (KFCM) located in Eden Prairie, MN.  What started out as a handful of seasoned pilots based on the field with donuts and coffee, this event blossomed into nearly 100 pilots every week attending seminars featuring various safety topics such as weather, medical issues, maintenance, new technology, and much more.  Now, AirTrekNorth, a flight schovol started in Lakeville, MN, carries on the tradition in their KFCM location.

While you may have thousands of hours, or you’re just starting to fly, the FAA Safety Team (FAAST) has turned to a creative way to approach many safety topics affecting pilots today.  They also have the WINGS program which allows you to get credit for the training you complete online with organizations such as AOPA and the FAA through training, such as the Saturday seminars.

After the seminar, you will find pilots milling about for hours talking flying (if the weather is bad), or they inevitably go to their own hangars and get their aircraft ready for a spin in the beautiful Minnesota weather.

You Fly to the North Shore

While Minnesota doesn’t have the ocean to boast of when referring to great scenic flights, we do have the North Shore – a.k.a., the shores of Lake Superior which is one of the largest, freshwater lakes in the country. 

Flying to the North Shore in the summer can be a great way to beat the heat.  Some great destinations include Duluth International Airport. Sky Harbor Airport (near downtown Duluth), Two Harbors, and many more.  Many of these small, North Shore towns boast spectacular views of the lake including great restaurants to grab a bite to eat before heading back to the Twin Cities. 

 

If you’re considering making a weekend out of it with family or friends, head to Duluth International Airport and find a rental car or courtesy car from the local Fixed Base Operator (FBO).  There are several great hotels in downtown Duluth on the shore or further into the city.  There’s an aquarium, museum, and much more to do in town.

Flying north of the Twin Cities to the North Shore gives you a great flight to experience Minnesota and is a great way to get your Minnesota flying friends together for a day – besides, building cross-country time is always a bonus. 

You Go to the WOTN Air Expo Every Single Year

Another great aspect of Minnesota flying is the Wings of the North (WOTN) Air Expo held every year at KFCM.  What started as a non-profit organization in the late ‘90s, designed to preserve and present aviation history, it has blossomed into a Twin Cities aviation fixture.

Their museum is located at KFCM and WOTN hosts the Air Expo every July featuring many aviation organizations in the community with sponsors from Sun Country Airlines, Minnesota Flyer magazine, UTC Aerospace Systems and more.  WOTN also brings in many static displays from public and private collectors from all eras of aviation including World War I (WWI), WWII, and more. 

This great family event is a fun way to connect with those in the community and meet other pilots from the area as they all come flocking to this annual event.   It’s also a great way to support a local non-profit whose mission is to preserve aviation history. 

Overall, Minnesota is really a great place to be a pilot.  With all of the seminars, fly-ins, local airshows, cookouts, and destinations, it can be hard to find the time to actually get it all done!  As a pilot, we’re always looking for new places to go, so start your wish list now for Minnesota and start checking those boxes off.

Remember, you only have so much summer to get it done!  Happy flying!

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Aviation Safety | GlobalAir.com | Airports | Lydia Wiff



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