Airports - Page 11 Aviation Articles

Bowman Field celebrates 90 years

Our offices sit below the control tower at historic Bowman Field (LOU) in Louisville, Ky.

Its historical society cheered 90 years of history at the airport over the weekend. Local news coverage of the event, including video, can be found here.

To read deeper into what once was the busiest GA airport in the country, check out a brief history of the facility here.

Later in the week, we will post a deeper look at the history of amphibious naval aircraft in the area.

Aviation News Rundown: Ocala airport to open ATC tower

Quick-hitting news notes this morning in what should be a busy Friday for us here at GlobalAir.com (will post more about that later if time permits).

The big story coming into the day was the announcement yesterday of a committee to advise the federal Transportation Department in a concerted attempt to strengthen the economy within the aviation industry. Links are posted in the blog entry below this one. Other news tidbits:

- Aviation Week follows up on Chevron’s recent announcement that it will end the branding of its and Texaco fuels at 200 FBOs in 27 states by this fall.  Benet Wilson reports that many FBOs first learned of the move from other fuel providers trying to win them over.

- An ATC tower will open for business at the Ocala (Fla.) International Airport (OCF) on May 17. Controllers will direct traffic with visual observation.

- Russian Helicopters plans to roll out a fifth-generation helicopter for combat that would be invisible to radar and able to attack fighter jets. The company needs a government contract before it can move forward.

Finally, the AP reports that 9-year-old Ruben Van Assouw, survivor of the Airbus crash this week in Libya, may soon return home. His parents and brother are thought to be among the 103 killed. 

Airports and social media

Airlines give customer support and announce promotions on Twitter. Their presence on the micro-blogging social media site has won them great gains, as well as cost them a couple PR black eyes.

Take Southwest for example.

Its airfare promotions and other tidbits announced on the site have resulted in its Twitter account gaining more than 1 million followers. Whenever the company makes an announcement, each one of those followers hear about it directly.  That kind of promotion cannot be bought.

On the other hand, when movie director Kevin Smith ran into a seating snafu with the airline, it created a fair amount of backlash for the company as the spit hit the fan on Twitter.  With the highs, so come the lows.

Social media accelerates both gains and losses for companies who utilize services such as Facebook and Twitter.

InventorSpot.com looked at how social media benefits airports that use it, and how untapped potential in the industry still runs rampant.

It pointed to how Minneapolis-St. Paul International (MSP) offers online discounts that can be accessed via smart phone and presented to an airport retailer or restaurant for a discount.

The site then wonders how AirMall at Pittsburgh International (PIT), home of the highest grossing retail sites at a U.S. airport, would fare if it adopted a similar approach.

Read the complete article and its analysis here, and let us know in the comments how social media has affected your aviation business — or your experiences with aviation businesses — for better or worse.

Cashing in on that $100 hamburger

With the weekend finally here, many recreational pilots will take to the sky with a tiding of good weather in search of that ever-allusive $100 hamburger.

While fuel and rental costs mean that burger likely will cost $200 or more, it’s the thrill of the flight that certainly outweighs the cost of getting to the meal.

Enjoy the journey, not the destination, right?

There are several great sites online to assist in finding where to land for that pancake, burger or whatever meal you desire, many of them featuring user feedback to know what others think of a place. Such tools help eliminate the dread of flying two hours to an unknown spot only to receive poor service.

Of course, right here on our site you can plug your destination into our Airport Resource Center and find a rental car, hotel, $100 hamburger, FBO or any other service you may need after landing. And our Max-Trax software is built to save you money on fuel along your route.

Other great sites for the pilot with the picky palette include Fly2Lunch.com. It features a great search tool, and its only setback is the lack of information at listed airports. (There are no diners listed on the site for FXE, FLL, OSH or even our beloved LOU).  

AdventurePilot.com provides a useful virtual map. Users plug in a home airport and set a nautical-mile radius. Press enter and see dozens, if not hundreds, of surrounding spots to play, eat, and sleep.

Perhaps the most simple and user-interactive $100 hamburger site is Flyingfood.com. Starting with its national map, a navigator can double click to zoom to a particular region, honing in on user-reviewed eateries. The numbers hovering above a location indicate the user rating of a spot.

Perhaps these tools keep you a happy pilot and never a hungry pilot.

If you happen to be flying to Louisville, I strongly recommend a stop at W.W. Cousins for your $100 hamburger. The staff cooks delicious burgers to order and bakes buns and desserts on site. A mile-long topping bar lets you pile on anything under the sun, from sweet pepper relish, jalapenos, Dusseldorf mustard and even fancy ketchup, you will find it all.

And it’s only a mile from Bowman Field. Perfect.

Please let us know about your endeavors to get a $100 (or however much it costs) hamburger in the comments section. And happy flying.

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