Airports - Page 8 Aviation Articles

Jetex Plans Aggressive FBO Expansion This Year

Article by: Chad Trautvetter
Brought to you by: www.ainonline.com

Jetex Flight Support, which provides business aircraft handling services around the world and operates two FBOs in Europe, is pursuing an aggressive growth strategy that could see its FBO holdings triple over the course of this year, the Dubai-based company said at MEBA. According to Jetex president and CEO Adel Mardini, Jetex plans to open FBOs this year at Dubai World Central’s Al Maktoum International Airport (DWC), as well as two new locations in Europe and one in the Far East. At DWC, Mardini said Jetex has signed a memorandum of understanding and is in final negotiations for a long-term lease on a facility, hoping to open this FBO by year-end.

Jetex also has ambitions to expand in the Americas, planning eventually to supply fuel to international operators in domestic airports in Mexico and Colombia, much like it does now in Brazil. In addition, Jetex wants to get a bigger foothold in the U.S. market for international flight planning.

Kentucky Institution For Aerospace Education - Reaches For The Sky


MISSION: to improve student learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and create career pathways in aerospace throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

         Albert Ueltschi, born in 1917 and was raised in Franklin County, Kentucky. Ueltschi attended high school in Franklin County and eventually developed the school’s first ever aeronautical course in 1946.

         Decades later, a man by the name of Tim Smith is teaching an algebra mathematics course in this very same high school. Since algebra is often as mentally straining as rocket science, one might presuppose that this subject does not typically come as natural to the average 15 year old. Mr. Smith recognized a potential problem as he watched his students struggle. With this, he began to generate a brilliant solution!

         Mr. Smith began studying; he was searching for a way to reach out to his adolescent peers. He longed to find a method of teaching that would allow room to engage in fun, yet educational activities; both inside as well as outside of the classroom. According to Mr. Smith, students always ask where they will use what they have learned in school throughout their real lives. Without a reason for learning, these students are likely to approach important topics with a lack of motivation and according to Mr. Smith; this lack of motivation creates poor learning habits in students. “Mathematics and science are tough enough for kids as it is. So why not give them what they are asking for?” says Mr. Smith. The STEM program was developed to reach out to these students, providing hands-on training in aircraft technology with hopes of making difficult school subjects more relevant and fun for students, while quietly boosting state test scores as well. He intends to show his students how subjects such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics are relevant in the world and he intends to teach these skills through aviation. “Why not restore and rebuild old aircraft?” He says. With that, The Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education was developed.

         As Mr. Smith continued with his research he discovered and learned of Albert Ueltschi and his achievements in aviation at Frankfort High School. “During Ueltschi’s time, the aviators were the rockstars!” Mr. Smith exclaims. “Everyone wanted to grow up to become a pilot, and when people looked up to the sky what they saw were heroes. Now, it seems our students don’t look up at all, growing up to become a pilot is not even considered an option.” He states. Educators hope to use the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education hand in hand with the STEM program to change this theory. Aviation is in fact a very attainable goal; especially for high school students who have been offered the opportunity to jump start their careers through programs such as the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education. An event such as “Aviation Day” out of Capital City Airport is just one of many events that this Institution is reaching out to; all with high hopes of inspiring young adults in our community. According to Mr. Smith, the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education simply wants to show young adults how aviation can be a very real opportunity for them. “This is definitely an opportunity that has the potential to change their lives” says Mr. Tim Smith.

         During the first 3 years, the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education maintained their program out of Frankfort High School. Only one other school in the area had caught on so they simply worked together. However as more of Kentucky educators began hearing about and sharing this fantastic opportunity, the program grew immensely. Today, a mere 7 years later the program has expanded to include 15 different high schools throughout the state of Kentucky. They have acquired and built a total of 8 aircraft, 2 of which are airworthy and now in use for student training. Recently the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education was offered a generous donation of land from the Capital City airport of Frankfort (FFT) as well as the Kentucky Department of Aviation for the production of their program’s soon to be hangar. Through the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education high school students are able to examine and experience firsthand what it may feel like to work in multiple fields, while receiving college credit to do it. If a student chooses piloting for example, they are given an opportunity to acquire a private pilot’s license completely free of charge to them. If that is of no interest, other programs are offered including Aeronautical Engineering, Space Systems as well as Operations and Maintenance.

         The Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education is currently in the process of building a hangar for its students to get more involved. Eventually, the program would like to have an entire facility specifically for the education of its students. This is a 501(c)(3) non-profit program, but with the help of generous donations and grants, Mr. Smith says he would eventually like to see this program offering not only a full staff of teachers, but also specially designed classrooms, aircraft and tools. This is a fantastic opportunity for high school students today. Overall there are a total of 60 programs similar to this one throughout the United States. Of that 60, 15 of those programs are based out of the state of Kentucky thanks to this very program. This is a part 61 training course and there are currently over 600 students involved.

For more information please contact: [email protected]
Or call: (502)320-9490

 

Above are photos of a Cessna 195 that the high school students of the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education are currently in the process of rebuilding. All of these parts have been salvaged and will be refurbished entirely. Mr. Smith says the objective for this aircraft (as for many others) is air worthiness and eventually student training.

Kentucky Department Of Aviation Hosts "Aviation Day" 2012


 

- The mission of the Kentucky Department of Aviation is to provide a safe and secure air transportation system that ensures the mobility of people and goods, enhances economic prosperity, and preserves the quality of our environment and communities.

         “Aviation Day” was an absolute sell out this year! On September 22, 2012 the Kentucky Department of Aviation and the Kentucky National Guard hosted a warm and welcome, family oriented “Aviation day” out of Capital City Airport in Frankfort, Kentucky. The idea for this event was originally inspired by the Boone National Guard and the transportation cabinet of Kentucky, specifically the Department of Aviation. These groups came together in hopes of finding an event that might inspire families as well as the youth and teach them about aviation. “We want to get folks interested and involved in aviation” says the assistant director of The Kentucky Department of Aviation; Mr. Scott Shannon.

          This event was entirely free for all to attend and offered free flights for the youngsters ages 8 – 17. $10.00 flights were also offered to any and all grown-ups attending with hopes of flying. All proceeds that were collected went to the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education and these flights were made possible thanks to generous donations as well as a group known as the Young Eagles. There was much to see and do including the many various aircraft that were set up for display. Of these aircraft, the airport provided civilian, private as well as military airplanes and helicopters for viewing and touring. It felt like walking into a wealth of knowledge as blatant as a brick wall; this event had it all! The Civil Air patrol was also on site recruiting volunteers, as well as the National Guard. Even the humane society decided to join in for the fun and contributed with adopt-a-dog programs.

         The very first “Aviation Day” was held in the fall of 2002 and became an annual event until 2008. Now, thanks to all of the aviation fans in our community Aviation Day is back with a bang! Flights were made, and people were absolutely engulfed into the aviation world. The Civil Air Patrol even recruited my father. Capital City Airport will continue with its high hopes for success as they continue to pose fantastic opportunities for students to delve into the wild world of aviation head first. According to Mr. Scott Shannon, children just aren’t given the same opportunities that they once were in the aviation career field. “We want to change that, we want our students to experience flight in real life and we want to encourage them to experience this in a general aviation aircraft while continuing to educate them.” What better way to do that then host an annual aviation day where the doors are always open and the entry is always free?

If this event sounds like something that interests you, get involved! Aviation Day needs people that are hungry for knowledge and inspired by the aviation world!

For more information regarding next year’s event contact Mr. Scott Shannon:

Scott Shannon
Assistant Director,
Capital City Airport Division
90 Airport Road
Frankfort, KY 40601

Telephone: 502.564.0520
FAX: 502.564.0172
Website: cca.ky.gov

History In The Making For Ms. "Memphis Belle"


 
 

“We Used To Call It Luck” - Wayne Tabor

         On a non-stop flight from Brazil to Africa, Wayne Tabor is 21 years old. He is riding on the right side of the Boeing B-17, alert at all times because their carrier is under attack. He is a waist gunner and completely exposed as his squadron is rapidly approaching enemy boarders. He will complete 30 missions in a matter of 72 days averaging out to a rugged 6 missions per day over Nazi occupied Europe. Everything seems to move at the speed of light until you hear a “THUMP,” and then another “THUMP” all at once you realize, “these guys are trying to kill us!” Brace yourself as the enemy aircraft approaches you at 400 mph, too fast to rebut the blow; too fast to shoot down. “But fighting doesn’t solve anything” says Tabor “More than 26,000 lives were lost, 26,000 stories were never told. It’s just not worth it.”

          Tabor’s squadron eventually completed so many missions that they were grounded. Wayne Tabor stepped up and out of that Boeing B-17 and he did not return. That all changed September 24, 2012 when 93 year old Wayne Tabor made his way to Clark County airport and ventured back on to this aircraft after 72 years. “It brought back a lot of really good memories!” he stated with sheer certainty. “Whenever you watch television now-a-days, you see all of these crazy reality shows! THIS he said, while pointing to the B-17; fighting a war in this aircraft is the ultimate reality.”

         Upon meeting the pilot of this novel aircraft I quickly learned of the true value that has been invested here. The Pilot’s name was Mr. Ray Fowler; turns out he is an extremely successful and well rounded pilot. Mr. Fowler has been flying B-17 aircraft for 12 years now and everyday is a new adventure. “It never gets old” he declares. This beautiful four engine aircraft belongs to a 501(c)(3) non-profit flying museum known as The Liberty Foundation. Any funds that are generated immediately go back into this aircraft, simply offsetting the aircraft’s high cost of maintenance. The mere interest of the people is what keeps this aircraft alive and on tour. Thanks to the prevailing interests and generous donations of aviators throughout our country, this historic aircraft is still in flight today. Without the help of others, the Memphis Belle would surely be silenced and permanently placed in a museum.

         The Liberty Foundation’s Memphis Belle is in fact, one of only 13 remaining B-17’s that still fly today, as most of them were lost in European combat during the war. Lucky for us, this particular “Memphis Belle” was built toward the end of the war and never personally experienced any combat. It has however been painted to exactly match the original, historic “Memphis Belle” B-17 that flew countless missions with the 91st bomb group of the mighty 8th Air force; the first B-17 to complete 25 missions. Interestingly enough, The Liberty Foundation’s Memphis Belle happens to be the very same Memphis Belle that was hired for the filming of the Memphis Belle movie in England, 1989.

         The Liberty Foundation’s World War II Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress “Memphis Belle” is taking to the skies over Louisville, Kentucky on its first ever national tour. The Liberty Foundation’s B-17 is now on tour providing visitors with an exciting opportunity to take a step through time and learn more about the men and women who gave so much to protect our country. The Memphis Belle will be on tour for the next few weeks, making flight “missions” possible, without being shot down from the sky (we hope). With each “Mission” curious aviators will be invited to take wing in this historic aircraft where participants will receive a pre-flight safety briefing that contains historical significance of the aircraft as well as a spectacular scenic air tour around the city. During this flight, passengers will be encouraged to move freely about the cabin in order to enjoy the unique opportunity of visiting the various positions of a combat crew.

         Over the next few weeks the B-17 flight experience will also be available in the Indianapolis, Indiana, followed by St. Louis, Missouri, and Memphis, Tennessee. Public flights will begin in the mornings, followed by ground tours in the afternoon; the hours of operation are from 10am to 5pm each day. Your “mission” will take roughly 45 minutes to complete with approximately half an hour in flight. B-17 flights are $410.00 for Liberty Foundation members and $450.00 for all non-members. Passengers can become a Liberty Foundation Member for $40 and will in turn receive the member discount for all family and friends.

This is your invitation to take part in this upcoming weekend’s mission. The Liberty Foundation’s Boeing B-17 Memphis Belle will be in the Louisville, Kentucky area September 29 – 30, 2012 and it will be located at the Clark County air port in Sellersburg, Indiana. Have you gone for a flight in this aircraft previously? Tell us about it in a comment below! We would love to hear your stories!

Clark County Airport (KJVY)
Aircraft Specialists FBO
6005 Propeller Lane
Sellersburg, IN 47172


Call 918-340-0243 and schedule your flight today! To view the full schedule: follow - https://www.libertyfoundation.org/schedule.html

Two Communities Look To Close Airports

Article By: Curt Epstein
Aviation International News

Blue Ash Airport, a part of Cincinnati, Ohio since the 1920s, was slated to close at the end of August following the city’s notification to the FAA, effectively ending a five-year battle between the city and airport users. As recently as last year the city had promised that the airport would continue to operate, albeit in a reconfigured form, but by mid-August crews had begun to remove the tanks in the fuel farm.

“The Cincinnati administration, led by Mayor Mark Mallory, has failed to honor previous commitments to AOPA and the aviation community that Blue Ash Airport would continue to operate as a general aviation airport,” said Bill Dunn, AOPA’s vice president of airport advocacy. With its 3,499-foot runway, the airport was once the busiest nontower facility in Ohio, according to Bill Christian, CEO of services provider Blue Ash Aviation, which plans to relocate to nearby Butler County Airport. Christian said the city of Blue Ash, which owns half the airport, plans to build a park and golf courses on its part of the site.

In another attempted closure, St. Clair, Mo., city authorities are wrapping up the final details requested by the FAA in their four-year process to shutter St. Clair Regional Airport. The city must receive FAA approval to close the airport since the obligations for federal grants used in land acquisition do not expire, and among the requirements specified by the agency was a meeting with interested stakeholders, including tenants and AOPA.

The city asserts the facility has failed to be profitable and is a drain on finances. If the FAA approves the closure, the city hopes eventually to lure retail merchants to the site, but Dunn believes the agency will not approve the closure. “The FAA is required under policy to consider a request to release an airport from federal obligations, but it is not required to grant the request,” he said.

(Image Credit: www.wcpo.com)

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