Aviation Technology - Page 21 Aviation Articles

The Cobalt Co50, a piston pusher that will hit 280 mph

Slick design? Check. Huge windows? Check. A turbo-charged piston engine that can scream through the sky? Check and mate.  This plane looks like it can play in the big leagues.

Cobalt Aircraft is unveiling its Co50 280-mph-piston pusher at Oshkosh next month.

Founded by a Georgia Tech aerospace grad, the Co50 project began in 2002.

Featuring a spacey interior and an enormous wrap-around windshield, the designers cleared the drawing board before developing this aircraft.

A 350-hp twin-turbo TSIOF-550-D2B pushes the Co50 to hit 245 KTAS at 8,000 feet, according to the company’s web site.  The site also features interactive tools to check out aircraft specs, such as weights and range.

The company soon will begin flight-testing for certification. Representatives will hold a press conference 10:30 a.m. July 28 at Cobalt’s display at Airventure, booths No. 21 and 22.

Cessna Citation X gets an upgrade for 2011

The Citation X will get a boost starting next year — in the cockpit and in the cabin.

Cessna announced this week that new jets will feature a Honeywell Primus Elite avionics suite, a modification on the current Honeywell Primus 2000 system. 

The Elite suite features LCD display of high-resolution approach charts, XM weather in the U.S. and southern Canada, map capabilities to show geographical and political markers, airspace and airways.

New CMS features in the Cessna jet include touch-screen controls and MP3 inputs.

The new Citation X cabin includes better stereo and an updated Airshow display, including dual Blu-Ray players and an HD display monitor in the forward closet.

UPDATE: The following is from AINOnline.

A Cessna spokesman told AIN the work will be done exclusively by the company’s nine Citation factory service centers. “While we have announced that this feature will be available we are still working on final certification and won’t know the downtime required for installation until 2011. We are looking at a cost of about $585,000,” he said.

ELTs on 121.5 MHz could be banned by FCC

 

The FCC last week issued a report that would ban emergency locator transmitters that operate at 121.5 MHz, in a decision that could affect thousands of GA aircraft.

The abolition of the devices, approved by the FAA, would take place in August.

The FCC said if the 121.5 ELTs were not available, aircraft operators will migrate to 406.0-406.1 MHz ELTs monitored by satellite. The assumptive posture is that satellite monitoring would make the devices more effective in search and rescue.

The AOPA spoke out against the decision yesterday, calling it costly and unnecessary.

“The FCC is making a regulatory change that would impose an extra cost on GA operators, without properly communicating with the industry or understanding the implications of its action,” said Rob Hackman, AOPA Vice President of Regulatory Affairs.  

Sound off below and let us know how this regulatory decision could affect you and whether or not you think it's the right move.

Cirrus rolls out turbo-charged SR22T

The first deliveries of the beefed up Cirrus SR22T take place today at Cirrus headquarters in Minnesota.

Cirrus announced Friday at its annual owners and pilots association meeting that it will ramp up its SR22 with a twin-supercharged model of the SR22 powered by a Teledyne TSIO-550-K engine. The aircraft manufacturer has dubbed the new model the SR22T, saying it complements the SR22 Turbo.

(The SR22T unveiling took place during a weekend that saw GA leaders from the AOPA sit down with representatives of piston-aircraft manufacturers for a four-hour meeting during the Dayton, Ohio convention to discuss concerns about pending conversion of aviation fuel to 94-octane unleaded to replace 100LL.

Those against the fuel-type transition say the changes will lead to thousands of aircraft owners needing conversions to their planes or losing power ratings.)

Other airframe modifications on the latest Cirrus offering include lighter nose landing gear, in addition to dedicated induction inlets and exit air louvers for better cooling.

Cirrus says the SR22T will also feature better and quieter takeoff and climb along with a higher useful load.

Starting price on the aircraft is $475,000.

 

Boeing 787 tests GE next-gen engine (via Flightglobal)

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Boeing today tested a 787 powered by General Electric’s next-generation composite engine.

GEnx-1B64 engines in a four-hour flight.

Flightglobal reports that this is the fifth Boeing 787 aircraft to be tested. Royal Air Maroc will deploy the 787-GEnx platform starting in early 2011.

The composite 787 is expected make its first commercial flight, powered by Rolls Royce Trent 1000 engines, for Japan’s All Nippon Airways by the end of this year.

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