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Trade Show? I Think You Mean Fun Show!

by Lydia Wiff 1. November 2016 10:00
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Growing up, I always remember my dad attending trade shows for the different companies he worked for.  Now, he was an engineer, so I always assumed they were pretty boring (sorry, Dad!).  It didn’t matter if he came home with all the trade show cool swag like pens, pencils, reusable bags, hats, or stress balls (to a kid, those things are like gold).  Several years later, I have learned that trade shows, aviation ones of course, are tons of fun and the opportunities to network and learn are endless!  This post will cover a few that I have had the chance to personally attend as well.

Air Venture

What summer would be complete without a trip to Oshkosh, WI for the Experimental Aviation Association (EAA) Air Venture?  I know, people don’t really think of it as a trade show, but have you really looked around when you’ve been there?

Icon is giving demos of their recreational aircraft (you can fish from it!), Cirrus is writing up orders for their new jet, and general aviation is absolutely thriving during this aviation extravaganza.  Hundreds of companies tote their wares all week in the hope they will meet new customers, see their current customers, and really just get their name out there.  9am-5pm are the show hours, but networking goes on for hours after the show is closed.

Companies like Cirrus, Piper, Pilatus, Kodiak, and many other woo their customers and new clients with cookouts, dinners, and more.  New products get shown over dinner and deals get sealed by the time the dessert menu gets passed around.  Additionally, this “trade show” features class acts from aerobatics pilots, showcases military aircraft from every era of aviation, in addition to the biggest pyrotechnic show you’ll ever see at an airport (actually, it’s probably the only one at an airport). 

I love going to Oshkosh when I have the chance and even if you aren’t working with a company, it’s a great place to network.  Just sitting at lunch one day this summer, I met a pilot who flies for SkyWest – now, tell me that Air Venture isn’t the most fun you’ll ever have at a “trade show”. 

National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

The second trade show I’ve had the opportunity to attend is that of the NBAA Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition (BACE) in Las Vegas in November 2015.  This particular trade show caters to any type of business with a corporate flight department in the United Sates and all over the world. 

I had the opportunity to attend last fall with a group from the University of North Dakota (UND).  Since we were students attending, we got a huge break in the conference fee and by that I mean it was so affordable even for a poor, college student!  All we had to do was take care of meals, flights, and lodging.  I found some fellow students from Purdue University who were members of Women in Corporate Aviation which proved to be a great networking opportunity in and of itself. 

Additionally, there were many universities that had their own booths at BACE including any company you could possibly think of.  I actually sat on one of the shuttle buses with a gentleman from Italy who worked for Pilatus – I told you it was a worldwide affair!  I also had the chance to meet those from other companies at the different booths in addition to after-hours functions.  A fun memory was going to the Las Vegas Executive Airport and looking at all of the static aircraft displays.  Gulfstream had many different aircraft on display, which is one of my favorite business jet manufacturers.

Lastly, NBAA BACE was a great way to faces to names.  I actually got to meet the owners of Globalair.com and those that had given me the blogging scholarship that year.  If I wasn’t so busy with classes, I’d be back this year promoting the scholarship!

Why Trade Shows?

You’re probably sitting there wondering why you should go to trade shows in general.  Besides the FUN aspect of trade shows, it’s important to continue to network even though you might currently be a student, or even if you are well into your career.

Last year, I had a professor that really pushed students to attend NBAA and to network in general.  In fact, many of my professors, including my adviser, always push students to get their names out there.  It doesn’t matter if it’s introducing yourself to a guest lecturer, meeting alumni, or attending trade shows.  I guess what I’m getting at here is that you never know what’s around the corner and growing your professional network only builds your contact list in addition to the possible jobs that could arise from it. 

Plus, going to these events is a great way to catch up with alumi!  I love running into people I know at these events – it makes the event that much more memorable and we get to talk about aviation (I mean, who doesn’t?).


Remember, NBAA BACE is just around the corner!

November 1-3, 2016 – Orlando, FL

Visit the Globalair.com booth – Booth 4936!

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GlobalAir.com | Aircraft For Sale | Lydia Wiff | NBAA | UND

So You Want To Insure Your Plane...

by Lydia Wiff 15. October 2016 10:00
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Imagine yourself here: you’ve finally saved enough to buy that beauty of a Cessna 172. You have got your pre-buy done, the loan paperwork finished and the delivery to your home airport all arranged.  You suddenly remember that you need insurance, but realize you have no clue if aircraft insurance works the same as car insurance.  Today’s post is designed to give readers an idea of how aviation insurance works – you’ll see that aviation insurance is similar to your car, but also very different. Before I give you the low-down on aircraft insurance works, it’s important to get a little history.

A Brief History 

After World War I, we begin to see the emergence of the civil aviation industry which goes hand in hand with the aviation insurance industry.  Post-war brought a surplus of war aircraft which were then either dumped into the market for pennies on the dollar.  An aircraft which had previously cost the government, such as $17,000 for a Curtiss Jenny, was being sold in the open market for as little as $50 – I don’t know about you but I’d buy an airplane right now if a Cessna was that cheap!

Former military pilots all over the country were buying these cheap planes up using them for a variety of civil aviation activities such as barnstorming (trick flying), crop dusting, mail delivery, passenger transport, and more.  As one can imagine, these new civil aviation activities added a whole new risk for insurance companies and often resulted in crashes for a variety of reasons.  Companies were ill-equipped to handle this new risk and many saw a significant loss as a result.

However, one company rose to the occasion, despite an almost certain loss, and Travelers Insurance Company became the first to announce a comprehensive program specifically for air risks in 1919.  Travelers wrote lines of insurance primarily for maintenance, operation, and the use of an aircraft for private and commercial operations.  Several lines were included in the program including: life insurance, accident insurance for owners and pilots, trip accident ticket insurance, Workers’ Compensation insurance, and public liability and property damage insurance.  While Travelers was the first to offer these lines of insurance, it’s important to note that they did not include lines for damage to the actual aircraft (this is referred to as hull coverage). 

Over the next few years, which Travelers anticipated to be a period of profit, the company ceased to exist in 1931 after being in business for 12 years.  Several other companies sprung up during those first years after Travelers made their foray into aviation insurance.  As the aviation insurance industry stabilized, companies that exist still today started to appear such as United Sates Aircraft Insurance Group (USAIG), the Associated Aviation underwriters (AAU), and the Aero Insurance Underwriters (AIU).  With several new companies in the U.S. market and an abundance of accidents during the early years, companies began to look for ways to spread the risk so that losses were not so significant. 

Group Approach, the Law of Large Numbers, & Reinsurance

As many new companies were entering the aviation insurance industry, it was discovered there was a more economical way to do business in addition to spreading the risk.  Individual companies were taking huge losses when a claim was filed because of the damage to aircraft and property as well as the deaths of those involved.

The “Group Approach” was created with the intent not only to spread the risk between many companies but also to spread the profit between those same companies.  The founders of the group approach did considerable research in Europe (a country with a more developed aviation insurance industry) and found that indemnification (making a party whole after a loss) could be handled safely only by employing the group approach.  This new method of the group approach also brought about the synonymous concept of the “Law of Large Numbers” – the risk and profit are spread over a large number of companies which allows for a much more stable aviation insurance industry.

Another approach used to stabilize the insurance industry was the approach of “reinsurance”.  In the early days of insurance, a devastating fire threatened to bankrupt several of the local insurers and it was quickly discovered that insurance companies themselves needed to be insured against such catastrophic losses.  What began as a way to protect insurance companies became the essential element of aviation market supporting major airlines, airports, and even space risks.  Aviation insurance can be similar to auto insurance (premiums, liability, etc.), however there are some key differences that are important to know about. 

Direct Writers, Brokers, Underwriters & Policy Term Length

Recently I bought a new car.  To add it to my insurance, all I did was call up my insurance agent at State Farm® and give the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), make, model, year, and the accident history.  I opted for full coverage since it was a much newer car than I had owned previously and in a matter of minutes I had a binder (temporary insurance policy) ready for me at the office to pick up so that I could use my new car.

State Farm® is a great example of what is known as a Direct Writer.  A direct writer gives a you an aircraft policy option through their company, just like an auto insurance agent.  There is actually only one company that currently issues policies this way –  the Avemco Insurance Company.   This company is actually very popular with private owners of aircraft in general aviation, airports and Fixed-Base Operators (FBOs).  It can be argued that Avemco gives the best deal as they directly write their own polices, which brings me to the concept of insurance brokers.

Insurance brokers (as well as agents) are the middle men between insurance companies and people looking for insurance.  Brokers work for a commission (percentage) of the premium and work with certain companies to find the best policy for their client much like aircraft brokers look for the best buyer for their clients’ aircraft.  When they gather a list of different policies, they take them back to their client for comparison and selection.  Agents are a representative of an insurer and have delegated authority to act on behalf of their company.  Insurance agents, however, are often certified as both an agent and a broker.

An important item for novice plane owners to know is that the policy term is much different than that of auto insurance.  For instance, if you have auto insurance, you are probably set up for auto-renewal.  You pay your bill every month, every 6 months, etc., and your coverage continues along.  However, when it comes to aircraft insurance, a policy must be reviewed every year – this means that Avemco, your agent, or broker will be giving you a call to re-write your policy contract.  While this may be slightly annoying to you, it is actually in your best interest as it allows the company to revisit you and the aircraft and see what has changed in the last year.  The assumption is that risk has changed at some point whether that relate to you as the pilot or the aircraft itself.

Closing Thoughts

Prior to a few months ago, I actually could not have told you the differences between auto and aviation insurance.  Since then I have been taking a class about aviation insurance and learning that it is a lot more complex that I originally thought.  I’m not sure when I’ll be able to insure an aircraft at this point, but just learning about it will only help me to become a more informed consumer.  Hopefully that is the case for my readers as well!

Works Cited

Brandon Wild, Assistant Professor, University of North Dakota, Aviation Insurance, Lecture, Fall 2016.

Wells, A., & Chadbourne, B. (2007). Introduction to aviation insurance and risk management. Malabar, Fla: Krieger.

Images courtesy of Google Images.

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GlobalAir.com | Aircraft For Sale | Lydia Wiff | UND

Top 5 Most Common Mistakes Among Pilot In Training

by GlobalAir.com 27. September 2016 15:06
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I want to first off begin this post by saying that I highly encourage everyone to go see the movie Sully now playing in theaters. In fact, this past weekend I went with the Sooner Aviation Club to see the movie at the Warren Movie Theater in Moore, Oklahoma. Here’s a group picture that we took right before we went and saw the movie.

Now onto more important things. With the semester in full swing and everyone trying to survive there first major exams and essay, I’ve also noticed that a lot of private pilots are taking a major step in their aviation career by soloing for the first time. I will never forget the first time I soloed back of October 13th 2015, and it’s a day that sticks with you for the rest of your life. As these students begin to work on the cross county portion of their private pilot’s license, I want to share my top 5 most common mistakes that students, and even myself, have made and continuously make.

#1- Forgetting the Checklist- By now I’m sure everyone has heard their flight instructor repeat this phrase multiple times “Are you forgetting to do something?” and 99% of the time they are referring to a checklist. Believe me I’ve heard this multiple times when it comes to flying and it’s definitely something that is easy to forget; however, it’s there for a reason and that is for the safety of yourself, your passengers, and the aircraft so if you are constantly forgetting a checklist this is a habit you need to break ASAP especially when it comes to a check ride.

#2- Landing too fast or to slow- When it comes to landing on final it’s all about your airspeed and making sure you are keeping it constant which means you absolutely need to be working the throttle constantly; however, never add too much power or pull it out when you are on final. This can lead to floating down the runway for a long time, or in the case of taking too much power out, you risk the chance of stalling the aircraft. In any case you feel like it’s going to be a bad landing it’s okay to call a go around, in fact it’s the best option. Remember you aren’t forced to land the aircraft on your first try if it looks like it’s going to be an unsafe landing.

#3- not flaring or over flaring- Along with the speed of the aircraft, a lot of people forget to flare the aircraft before hitting the runway which can lead to a hard landing, bouncing down the runway and even possible damage to the aircraft. Believe me if you don’t flare you could possibly damage the front of the aircraft or worse the propeller, so make sure you add that flare once you are over the runway to ensure not damaging the front. Equally as important is not to over flare since it could lead to a tail strike damaging the back of the aircraft and damaging the landing gear. The biggest thing I’ve noted when it comes to flaring is to just add small amounts of back pressure as I get closer to the ground preventing me from damaging the front or the back of the aircraft.

#4- wind corrections- So this is by far the biggest thing I always get harped on, not going to lie. Remember as pilot in command you are responsible for adding any wind correction because at any time a sudden burst of wind can hit your aircraft and possibly cause for you to flip over. It’s also important you add wind correction during takeoff and landing for the exact same reason, you don’t want to end up upside down like this aircraft.

#5- Situational Awareness- When it comes to flying it’s very easy to get fixated on your instrument especially during a maneuver. For example, when I use to do steep turns I would always focus on my turn coordinator to make sure I rolled on the proper heading. Next thing I knew the nose of the airplane was facing down and I was losing 500ft per minute and it took me a while to break that habit. While your instruments are a great resource, guess what? Your eyes are a better resource and you should always be aware of what’s going on around you. For all you know there could be another aircraft in your area, you could have a bird strike, or in my case you could be losing altitude so always be looking out outside to make sure you are aware of your surroundings.

 

By Cameron Morgan

Where Are They Now?

by Lydia Wiff 15. September 2016 08:00
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Ever wondered what happens to students after they graduate?  Ever notice how their news on lives suddenly tapers off in our modern-day world where social media this time of year used to be filled with this class and that class, hockey games, football games, etc.?  Well, this summer I had the chance to catch up with a recent University of North Dakota (UND) graduate, Tony Batson, at the 2016 AirVenture in Oshkosh and learn about how he started at UND and what he’s up to these days.  

That Chicago Kid…

Tony grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, IL and not surprisingly, had exposure to aviation from a young age.  His father was a big part of his interest in aviation as he was told stories about aviation in World War II as a young kid.  Tony was also into model aircraft building as well as Remote Controlled Aircraft (RCA).  His interest for aviation piqued in high school when he had his first Discovery Flight at Chicagoland Aviation and soon he was working for the company as an aircraft detailer and in their office at the Lewis University Airport (KLOT).

Tony began his search for an aviation university in high school and looked at schools such as Purdue University, and others.  One of his managers was actually a UND alumni which greatly factored in his decision as he heard of how professors at UND would go above and beyond for their students. On a “freezing, cold October day”, Tony made the trip to the upper Midwest and the rest was history.

Being at UND…

Like most students, Tony’s first year was a bit of a culture shock – especially coming to the Midwest after living in the suburbs of a major U.S. city.  His roommate, a local to Grand Forks, took him under his wing.  Tony remembers when they first met his roommate offering his cars and spare keys for whenever he needed to use it.

Flying didn’t always come naturally for Tony and sometimes lessons were challenging, but Tony “hit the ground running”.   He wasn’t just involved in flying – he was also involved in different student groups on campus.

There were many groups that focused on aviation at UND, but Tony remembers Alpha Eta Roe as the “one club I really stuck with”.   As soon as he joined, he had a position – he worked his way through different leadership positions and ended up as the President of the aviation fraternity.  He remembers it as a way to network with leaders of other student groups on campus and what a benefit it was.

After UND…

College wasn’t always about Alpha Eta Ro as he remembers advisers and professors alike as being a positive influence on his time at UND.  However, the fraternity proved to be more than just a spare time activity as his work with the president of Piper Aircraft on a recent visit to UND landed him a job as a graduate intern in the Marketing Department.

He enjoys working with Piper Aircraft as it is something new every day.  Some days he could be working on developing checklists, or he’s working with Sales and matching sales leads with regional dealers or making that first contact.  Recently, he’s been working on marketing the new fleet of Piper aircraft being built to replace the aircraft at UND (and doing a great job, by the way).

Some Words for Students…

I often wonder what graduates would say to students at UND, almost at UND, or fellow graduates.  Tony advises prospective students to get involved and get to know people while his advice to current students is to work hard because it’s a great time for pilots right now.  Grads have some special advice that he tries to embody on a day-today basis:  pay it forward and help the people behind you.

Where Are They Going?

After catching up with Tony, I couldn’t help but be excited about his aviation journey which is just beginning.  I also ruminated on how his current job and experiences were because of UND and the groups he was involved in while a student there – UND is truly a great place to be.

Are you a UND alumni?  Feel free to comment with your memories as a student there or any other school you attended!

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GlobalAir.com | Lydia Wiff | Piper | UND

Choosing The Right MRO For Your Pre-Buy Inspections

by GlobalAir.com 10. August 2016 09:02
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By Mike Saathoff – Director of Estimating and Paint and Interior Sales
Elliott Aviation

Whether you are buying or selling an aircraft, a pre-buy can be a hassle; but it shouldn’t be if you secure a solid, non-biased MRO. Just as you would when you buy or sell a house, pre-buy inspections are a must to protect both parties in the transaction. There are a few key items to help make the process smoother. Whether you are the broker, buyer, or the seller, keeping the sale moving forward is important. Paperwork, airworthiness, scheduled items and coming to an agreement are all part of the pre-buy process. Let’s discuss these key items and how to keep all parties in mind.

Choosing a Broker:
Be selective and do your research when choosing an aircraft broker. Do they have integrity? Can you trust them? Will they have your best interest in mind? Find a broker you are comfortable with and one you can trust. Look for someone with experience and knowledge of aircraft sales. This person should be able to see all sides and assists you with the best possible outcome.

Choosing a Maintenance Provider:
Ensure the facility that is performing the pre-buy inspection or any facility that maintains the aircraft has industry longevity, as well as experience in executing pre-buys for the type of aircraft you are purchasing. Make sure the facility has a history of working on the aircraft model. As a buyer or seller, competitive pricing plays a role in your pre-buy inspection. Always keep in mind that cheaper doesn’t always mean you are getting a deal. Make sure the facility you are working with is using solid quality standards to ensure they are keeping the aircraft airworthy but not going to extremes. Either extreme can be very costly to the buyer or seller. Trust in a company to do a thorough inspection in an acceptable downtime is key.

The Pre-Buy Inspection:
Keep the sale moving. To ensure a sale continues to move forward, reviewing logbooks is a meticulous effort. Having all necessary paperwork in order can help the process along and is highly beneficial. Knowing who maintained the aircraft, if the aircraft always stayed on schedule, how many hours the aircraft has flown per year, and has the aircraft sat idle or extended periods of time are all questions a pre-buy inspection addresses, and this helps to ensure airworthiness.

Other items to be completed during a pre-buy are any scheduled maintenance events. Next, the facility needs to determine if there are burn certificates for the interior, if new paint is due, if the aircraft is on a current inspection program; these are all questions that must be answered. If the current warranty allows, a thorough engine review is done both on paperwork and a boroscope. The facility should conduct an external review of the aircraft for any obvious defects, specifically windows and boots. Brake wear checks and fuel tank external leak checks are other items performed.

Most importantly, you want to find a non-biased facility who will ensure the aircraft is properly inspected and repaired in accordance with maintenance standards, but not one looking to “rebuild” the aircraft.

Lastly, it is up to the buyer and seller to come to terms on an agreement of who should pay for what necessary or optional items. A solid, non-bias broker will be highly beneficial in this process and assist with maintaining what would be fair to all parties.

Mike Saathoff has been with Elliott Aviation since July of 1996. He has performed various roles within the company, including Maintenance Team Leader, Assistant Chief Inspector, Maintenance Sales Manager, Director of Maintenance Sales and most recently Senior Director of Sales. Mike Saathoff is currently our Director of Sales Support and Paint & Interior Sales.

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GlobalAir.com | Paint and Interior



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